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June 26, 1923 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-06-26

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:43 1.:

DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

.. . n.

No. 4

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JUNE 26, 1923

PRICE

500.

ARE

REGISTERED

As

SESSION

UPE

ASINSULIN' FND,
PHILANTROPHIST DONATES MON-
EY FOR STUDY OF NEW
DIABETES CURE
WILL OPEN NEW FIELD
OF MEDICINE HERE
Cabot Enthusiastic Over Gift; Says
Possibilities Wide for Great
Work
Announcement of a gift to the Uni-
versity of $10,000 by John D. Rocke-
feller, Jr., for the study of the proper-
ties of insulin,,a new drug said to be
a.cure for diabetes, was made recently
from the office of the President.
Authorities in the Medical school
are enthusiastic dver the gift which
will finance experiments and treat-
ments with one of the most'recent dis-
coveries in the field of medicine.
Cabot Pleasedk
Dean Hugh jabot, of the Medical
school, in commenting upon' the gift,
said: "We are just at the beginning
of the development of insulin, and the
git by Mr. Rockefeller is very ap-
propriate at this time." Dean Cabot
explained that although the full pos-
sibilities of the new drug are not
*known it has been a success in many
cases.
Diabetes, he continued, is common
in the United States, especially among
young children and is a characteristic
disease of prosperous countries. Un-
til recently it has geen a difficult
malady to combat because it was be-
lieved that diet was the only prac-
tical method of treatment.
Newburgh 4o Take Charge
The diets prescribed - excluded the
element qf sugar and other energy-
giving properties wpich kept the pa-
tient in a constantly weakened condi-
tion. Within the last year Prof. Louis
H. Newburgh, of the Medical school,
formulated a diet which includes fat,
and gives the necessary aid to the
health and vigor of the patient. Pro-
fessor Newburgh will have charge of
the Rockefeller fund in the Univer-
siity. .
PLANCOMPLETION OF
TWOIIDNSBy FLL
Two new buildings will be available
or partially ready for use by next fall
and three other structures will be
well on their way to completion ac-
cording to 'i statement issued by the
building and grounds department yes-
terday. The engineering laboratories
and shops will be ready for occu-
pancy and a section of the new mod-
" el high school will probably be used
for rhetoric classes. The physics
building, the new literary building
and the first unit of the law club are
all under way atthe present time. ,
Nearly all of the structural work
on the physics building is complet-
ed and the outer 'facing and interior
work are being worked upon at the
present time. It fs expected that it
will be ready for use by the time
school opens in the fall of 1924. Con-
crete beams and flooring have been
completed for four floors on the new
Literary building and the skeleton of

the western part of the building will
be completed within the next two
months.
A small army of men have been
busy for the past two weeks excavat-
ing for the new Law club which is to
extend for two blocks along South
University avenue from State street
to Haven ayenue. All the former
structures on the north side of the
block nearest State street have been
razed while a law suit is temporarily
preventing work on the block just
west of Martha Cook dormitory. Ex-
cavations have been made on the for-
mer site of the Acacia house and are
being extended to South' University
avenue,1

Heads Uniuersity
Summer Session

GIFT ASSURES'
I COMPLET ION 0OF
READI.NG ROOM
WIDOW OF EDWARD WALDO PEN-
DLETON, '72, GIVES FUNDS TO
FINISH UNIT OF UNION
ROOM TO BE MEMORIAL
TO DECEASED ALUMNUS

Frayer Urges Liberalism As
Great Need Of World Today

"What the «yorld needs today more
than anything else is liberalism," said
Prof. W. A. Frayer of the history de-
partment yesterday in the opening lec-
ture of the summer school course.
"Thy crying need is for liberal lead
ers in diplomacy, in politics, and in
education. And," he added, "I take
a liberal to be a man with a brain
capable of expansion without crack
ing."
And let it not be thought that the
SUMMER TOURS'
BEGIN T'HURSDAY

Was Loyal Alumnus, Prominent
Educational and Civic
Interests

in

Dean Edward H. Kraus
Dean Edward H. Kraus, head of the
University Summer Session and re-
cently appointed .dean of the College
o Pharmacy.
EDITORIAL -
SUMMER WORK AND PLEASURE
Eiergetically challenging the swelt-
ering summer heat to down their am-
bition, several thousand young men
and women have enrblled ii the Uni-
versity's thirtieth annual Summer
Session. In opening its opportunities,
to such a large number of people,
Michigan extends her influence to those
outside the regularly enrolled student
body, hoping to further its purpose as
a leader in academic affairs.
Aside from providing intellectual
training for its students, it is the aim
of the Summer Session to acquaint.
them with the industrial developments
which have taken place in the close
proximity of Ann Arbor and the beau-
tiful natural formations which are
easily accessible. At* once providing
the training which is always charact-
erize a successful vacation, the eight
weeks course which has just begun
will, we hope, be worthy of a lasting
place in the memories of those who
have seen fit to spend a major part of
the summer studying here.
IN APPRECIATION
With the announcement of a dona-
tion to complete the reading room on
the second floor' of the Union, but one
unit of the building still lacks warrant
of completion. Putting sufficient
money at the disposal of the building
fund to finish and equip the room
which is to be dedcated as a memorial
to Ralph( Waldo Pendelton, '72, prom-
inent educator and philanthropist, the
donor has given the student. body a
place which will afford quiet and re-
laxation during the course of each
busy school day.
After several years of intermittent
campaigning to finish the reding room
the necessry amount has been given
by- a single individual who appreiated
the value of the Union and its under-
takings. The swimming pool still re-
mainsunfinished whle hundreds of
students would give anything for an
opportunity to swim in it. Although
there age many loyal friends among
our alumni, few seem .to fully appre-
ciate the good which substantial gifts
similar to that of the Pendleton Mem-
orial Library mean to the University.
"RADICAL" EDUACTORS
Are the positions of educators in
American universities who hold liber-
al, progressive, and so called "radical"
ideas in jeopardy? Recent events seem
to indicate that they ae sitting on
three-legged chairs as far as their' po-
sitions are concerned.
Traditional conservatism, in the form
of the Amherst Board ,of Trustees, has
once again interferred in education
and President Alexander Meiklejohn
of Amherst Colege finds himself out
of a job. The closing words of Dr.
Meiklejobn's farewell address are
significant.
"America is trying to be a democ-
racy and America doesn't know how
(Continued one Page Two)

A gift of funds, from ,Mrs. Cather-
ine B. Pendleton, .widow of Edward
Waldo Pendleton, '72, which are to
be used in the completion of the dec-
orating and furnishing of the Union
reading room, has been announced by
Homer Heath, general'm'anager of the
Union.
Will be Library
The gift was announced several
weeksago" in a letter from Mrs. Pen-
' dleton to President-emeritus Harry
B. Hutchins' in which Mrs. Pendleton
requested him to act as her repre-
sentative. Provision is made in .the
gift that it shall be designated as the
Edward Waldo Pendleton Memorial
library.
Mr. Pendleton, to whose memory
the room will be dedicated, was prom-
inent as an educator, a lawyer and a
civic administrator in Detroit. He was
a frequent conrtibutor to the Univer-
sity fund for the American Schools
at Rome and Athens and was closely
identified with alumni movements in-
cluding the Alumni Association. and
the building fund for Memorial Hall.
He later showed a keen interest, in
the building of the Union.
In the later years of his life he
served in high executive positions
with several Detroit manufacturing
firms. He died in Ann Arbor July 9,
1922.
Pool Remains Unfinished
The reading room of the Union and
the swimming pool have remained as,
two unfinished units in the Union
since its completion. The gift by Mrs.
Pendleton, raises again the question
of finishing of the swimming tank.
Nearly half of the necessary funds
have been contributed by alumni and
others interested. At present there is
no mens' swimming tank in the Uni-
versity.
NOT WAVE DUE TO.4
M ODERTE TODAY1
Chicago, June 25-(By A.P.)-The
hot wavb which has held the middle
west In the grip of a 90 degrees tem-
perature for eight days will moder-
ate tomorrow, the weather forecaster
announced here today.
Heat records in Chicago were brok-
en today when the temperature reach-
ed the 96 degrees. Several more
deaths and scores of prostrations
were reported.
League Men Challenge Harding
New York, June 25-(By A.P.)-
The League of Nations non-partisan
association sent a telegram to Pres-
ident Harding challenging his state-r
ment at St. Louis that the "League
of Nations is dead as slavery."
I TRYOUTS WANTED FOR I
I SUMMER DAILY STAFF I

New

Students Will Be Given Outing
by Local Business Men's
Club

CAMPUS AND CITY WILL
BE VISITED BY NEWCOMERS
Students new to Ann Arbor and the
University will have an oppotunity
of becoming acquainted with the city,
its boulevard and river drives, and
several campus buildings, Thursday
afternoon, June 28, at 2:30 P. M.,
when the first excursion of the sum-
mer session takes place. This first
tour was arranged not only to give
the students new to the community
an automobile trip through the out-
standing attractions of the city and
its environs, but to indicate in some
measure the cordial welcome Ann
Arbor extends to its student residents.
Cars for the hour's drive through the
residence sections, the two boule-
vards,,Barton Hills Couitry Club, and;
the 'Huron River shore road, are to
be furnished by the local Exchange
Club.
To Visit Union
Following t10e automobile outing,
the party will be conducted through
the main University library, by mem-
bers of the library staff. A visit to
the Michigan Union will then be sup-
ervised by Carlton Wells, director oXf
excursions, wpo will have generalp
charge of Thursday afternoon's pro-E
gram.1
It is expected that approximately
one hundred students will avail them-
selves of this first excursion, includ-
ing for the most part comparative
newcomers to the University.
Must Make Reservations
In order to assure adequate auto-r
mobile facilities it will be necessaryl
for the students planning to take the,
trip to leaves their names in the sum-
mer session office, room 8, Univer-]
sity hall, by Wednesday evening, June
27. Later excursions will require,
similar advance notice to the Direc-
tor.

world is not going rapidly towards
liberalism he continued. Present in-
dications of course seem to show that
we are heading towards conserva-
tism but the opposite is true. In Eng-
land the situation is peculiar: for the
first time in the history of parliament
we find his Majesty's opposition in
parliament, the radical party, and al-
though the present government is con-
servative, the constitution is of such
a natnire that It can be changed at
will. It will not be long. before the
extreme left of the house is in power.
In Germany, he said, the govern-
ment is liberal and will be liberal. It
is folly to think that monarchy will
ever return in Germany, for though
the present government must change.,
it is sincere, and the people are sin-
cere in their desire for a liberal gov-
ernment. Regarding Fiance Profes-
(Continued on Page Three)
32[IT STUDENTSj
GET ALLA' RAE
Ann Arbor High School Graduates are
highest in Number of Those
Honored
SENIOR AND JUNIOR CLASSES
LEAD WITH 9 ALL "A"'S EACH
Thirty-two students in the Literary
college made perfect grades during
the last semester of 1923, according
to an annnouncement made by Regis-
trar Hall yesterday afternoon, the
jumior and senior classes each con-
tributing nine, the sophomores eight
and the freshmen six. Former Ann
Arbor high school -students again out-
numbered the all-"A" students from
other preparatory schools, nine of the
perfect students being alumni of the
Ann Arbor institution.
Those receiving a grade of "A" in
all of their su'bjects for the past se-
mester are as follows. Seniors: Co-
sette Burchfield, Nona Donhorty, Fred-
erick G. Donner, Eugenia Katz, Mar-
garet Kraus, Louise Lamberton, Clar-
ence A. Peterson, Sigmund K. Proc-
tor, Mana Kirkpatrick.
Juniors: Lucille M. Chalmers, Al-
lin B. Cronch, Dorothy D. Dunlap,
Pauline F. Hall, Hjalmer S. Hansen,
Winifred S. Hobbs, James A. Miller,
George M. Ttoost, and Carl L. Whit-
church.
Sophomores: Aughsta Avery, Helena
L. Gustine, Austin Harel, Norman B.
Johnston, George Kingson, Woodward
A. Neithammer, Victor F. Ross, Ruth
M. Carson.
Freshmen: David R. Bishop, Hugh
B. Carnes, Eunice L. Eichorn; Helen
13. Hall, Edwin W. Miller, Clarice Win-
ans.

Figures for enrollment in
mer session last night show
increase of approximately
the figures given out at the
last year. Especially great
increases in the Graduate S
School of Education, the lat
ing an enrollment of 261 as
with 12 in 1922.
Gain 200 Over Last Y
The total from all depar1
date is 2,488 while the figur(
time last' year was but 2,288
ious schools showed the follo
als: Literary, 984; graduate,
ineering and architecture, 41
tion, 261; medicine, 219; 1
public health nursing, 214 an
acy 18.
The figures do not take int
eration those enrolled in the
School, in the second sessic
summer engineering camp,
logical station, and those v
'students who are studying in
It also does not include th(
tioners who are working on
of diabetes through' the use o
as provided in the recent R(
gift.
Outlook Good in Coaching
Coach Yost has already en
men ,in the Coaching School a
this department of the Summe
if, but in the second year of
ence, its prominennee in the
competitive athletics is alrea<
wide.
Dean Edward JI. Kraus fel
ent that the enrollment figu
reach 3000 by the close of i
when interviewed last nigh
as much as classes in the enm
college do not begin until th
ing a number of students in
partment have not enrolled
Similarly, many have not yet
ed in the other schools becau
fact that it is so early in the s
Look For 20 Per Cent 4
From present indications,
session will exceed the errol
last year by at least 20 per cE
scope of instruction has bee
ened again this season, offeri
courses which were never be
en during the.summer month
these are a number of gradua
es which are opened to underg
during the Summer session
which they can not gain acce
the regular school year.
PRESIDENT BURTON LEA
FOR SUMMER Va
' r sid en t M a rio n L . B u
Sunday, with his family,
Lake, Minn., where they w
the summer vacation. They
turn in September.

FIGUREB 5HOW
OF 200 OVERI
,3000 TOTAL GER
GRADUATE SCHOOL AND
OF EDUCATION SHOW M
INCREASES
COACHES SCHOOL S
PROMISE OF INCF
Department .Headed by Yos
Second Year Succesi
fully

Shelby Grows In Population
As Champ Fight Draws Near

Special to Tihe Daily
Shelby, Mont., June 15.-Every sun-
rise brings a larger and larger num-
ber of workmen to seek employment
constructing the gigantic arena be-
ing built in this little hamlet for the
Dempsey-Gibbons clash on July 4.
Frame buildings and canvas houses
are beginning to spring up in a man-
ner that causes the old-timers around
here to hark back to the days of
mushroom booms following the min-
ing developments. Some of these
buildings will be used as hotels, while
lunchrooms and more detailed dining
rooms will be installed in others. The
promoters are doing everything in
order that the July 4 battle will be
unequaled.
The managers of both Dempsey and
Gibbons claim that interference from
either state, local, or national au-
thorities is impossible for there is
nothing about the scene of the fight as
yet that would occasion suspicion.
From what can be seen around here,
the stories'circulated throughout the
country concerning the obvious law-
lessness prevalent in Shebly, were .the

work of somebody who probably was
not able to take the short end of a
good thing. The Montana clergy, al-,
most to a man, have assured the pro-
moters that if order prevails up to the
fight, there will be no organized op-
position from the church.
Both the principals were well on
their ways in the long and tedious
training grind, the champion at Great
Falls, and the challenger on the site
of the encounter. Dempsey's crevj of
sparring partners claim that for abil-
ity to "sock" and travel at top speed
for at least 10 rounds, the cham-
pion's equal has never been seen,
and that Jack is better now than ev-
er before, the Toledo seige. includ-
ed.
Eddie Kane, Manager of Tommy
Gibbons, is giving nothing away in
regard to his man, but there will be
no secret training for Tommy has
already started work in public, with
as able a staff of human punching
bags as ever graced a challenger's
table. Bud Gorman is noted for his
ability to make a man work, and Bud
can assimilate an exceedingly great
amount of punishment.

Tryouts for the editorial and
I business staffs of the summer
j Daily are wanted. Students de-
siring to do any work of this-
kind are requested to consult
with the managing editor be-
tween 7 and 8 o'clock any night
this week at the publication of-
fices in the Press Building.
The Daily affords practical
training in newspaper work both
,in the editorial and business de-
partments.

C
'
.
'
I
i.
f
a,
I
I
I
,
i

HEA
DI

All students in the Univ<
summer sesson will be all
th privileges of the Univi
Health Service located a
corner of Washtenaw and
land avenue which will be
from 8 to 12 o'clock on i
days, 8 to 12 o'clock on S
days, and from 11 to 12 o
. on Sundays throughout the
sion. Free medicinal serv
given to all students who ca
take advantage of it.
Physicians are available
times and can be securE
calling the Health Service it
ary, University 186-M.

LTH SERVICE (
UIRING SUMMER

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