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June 18, 1923 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-06-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Point in 1876, he served in the Indian er at the exerc
Wars, was chief ordinance officer en the degree
during the Boxer Rebellion, later a Interpretation,
member of the war council, and chief 'In mm
ordinance officer in the Worid War,
and is the inventor pof the disappear- . ; 33

of Ch

in

ing-gun carriage which has proved it- j
self in coast defense.
The degree, doctor of laws was also
conferred upon Judge Benjamin Na-
than Cordozo of the New York court
of appeals, and an author of reputation
in the field of legal science. He is
widely recognized as one of Ameri
ca's leading scohalrs and authorities
on jurisprudence.
Dr. John Franklin Jameson, di-
rector of the department of histori-
cal research of the Carnegie Institu-
tion in Washington and Managing ed-
itor of the American Historical Re-
view was another recipient of the de-
gree, doctor of laws. He is noted as
a h-lstorian of distinction, being a
correspondent fellow of the Britishh
Academy and the Royal Academy of
Belgium, and past-President of the
American Historical association.
Dr. Wilbur Lucius Cross, professor
of British literature and dean of the
griaduate school of Yale university l
was made a doctor of limane letters
by ,the University. His works have
been a distinct contribution to the
history of the English novel and his
able direction of the' Yale review has
given it an international reputation
as an organ of force, and originality.
The Reverend Doctor Harry Emer-
son Fosdick, special preacher in the
First Presbyterian church of New
York City and professor of practical
theology in the Union Theological
seminary, and KCommencement speak-

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H. A. MILLS, Commercial Agent, An Arbor, Michigan.

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Second-
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.. i

ISOICK SPEAKS
AT CRADUATIONi
(Continued from Page One)'
ed, "that we modern democrats,
scorn to truckle to an autocrat,
kle to the majority with all the
quiousn'ess of a courtier before
Jng. We continually bowl before
two great soverigns of the demo-
Ic state, The General Average and
Majority Vote."
lthough it is' doubtless true that
best way yet discovered to run
overnment is by election of ser-
is by popular suffrage, the speak-.
oubted the wisdom of majorities in°
_-3ons calling for spiritual insight.
e, he declared, the majorities
e almost certain to be wrong. The
es of the populace in music and
atue were cited as examples.
Scores Lawless
r. Fosdick then flayed the people
refused to live up to the level
ur social ipstitutions. Downright,
rant lawlessness, living way be-
the average, is appallingly xram-
t in America, he declared.'
rust at present we are having an
alling wave of lawlessness with
rence to the Volstead act," he
. "I do not see how a good Amer-
can take any less stand than
First, that he hates the liquor traf-
and all the damnation that it
igs on human life.
Second, that he' recognizes the
it of the state to put down, the
or traffic if a majority will, as it
tId put down a contagious disease.,
Third, that if he doesn't like the
sent law he is perfectly at liberty
agitate for its rephrasing and
,ndment to make it more reason-
e and enforceable.
Fourth, that in the meantime he
. keep the law."
'Live Above Law Requirements".
he speaker then told of the inad-I
acy of -pleading. with the gradu-
to be law-abiding. . He scored
se who are willng to let the law of
land alone be their standard: He
ught out the fact that the Com-
iwealth, having educated the men
women here today, expected them
ive far above the average.E
r. Fosdick applied the fact thatl
al institutions level up our worst
level down our best to organized
iness, the organized church, edu-
on, and international relation-
Ds.
Of conure" the s.nnaker said _in

soberly and in fear of God.' But this
also is true: all humanity is divided
into three parts: those who are below
the level, those who live at the level,
and those who are above the level.
And the best hope of democracy in
America* lies in having universities'
like this turn out generations of young
men and women who live above the
average and ahead of the tiime."
BURTON'TELLS OF
(Continued from Page One)
big issues which arose while they
were in office.
After bringing 'out the realities of
public service the speaker declared
'that the service could not be con-
demned because of imperfections, but
because it was an expression, though
imperfect, of great fundamental as-
pirations, it must be estimated in the
light of these aspirations, in doing
whichthe speaker touchedyupon the
theories underlying the duty to offer,
public service. The underlying theory,
it was declared, was the desire to
keep alive American democracy.
Asks Attitude
President Burton then inquired in-
The speaker then criticized the sel-
fish policies of those who are con-
tent to allow, others to. enter public
service in order that they, who were
more fitted, could gain greater pecun-
iary returns meanwhile. Among those
things which keep men from service,
it was declared, was the lack of will-
ingness to assert individual convic-
tions.
That the public must face squarely
the problem of nmobilizing her re-
sources of intelligence and leader-'
ship for public service was brought
out by the speaker. The suggestion
for meeting this 'proNem which was,
made was a realization that there.
exists a necdessity for high grade serv-,
ice, just - as during the recent war
that realization existed.
High Calibre Men Needed
The speaker then urged that a
means must be found whereby men
of high calibre will choose public.
service as a career. He brought out
that at. present 'a career of public
service to many men of discrimina-
tion and judgment seemed at best
precarious and instinctively repell-
ing. To remedy this condition he
suggested reasonably adequate sal-
aries, some certitude of advancement

-today both in state and national af-
fairs many questions are seriously
confused by politics in the bad sense.
Some issues at least are not settled
on their merits. Many fundamental
proposals become hopelessly involved
or inextricably intertwined with -the
political fortunes of groups or par-
ties. Often the real struggle is fought
out purely and simply to determine
who is in control of the situation."
President Burton then declared
there was need to re-define the place
of the individual citizen, declaring
that worth of the single person, one
of the fundamentals of our democra-
cy, has almost been forgotten.
Challenge toy Graduates
Closely connected with this the
President declared was the wave of
lawlessness which must be curbed.
Whether personal liberty is para-
mount is a ,problem to be 'solved, it
was said.
The speaker then briiefly touched
on the attitude of the country on
war and declared that this problem
of civilization, perhaps always to be
present, was one which the country
should not be afraid of. The' peace
loving country, which is peace loving
not because of f'ear .but_ because of
confidence in its resources, was nam-
ed as the most desired.
In concluding President Burton ask-
ed the graduates to 'keep the problems
of the country in mind even though
they were to be busydwith their- own
means of livlihood during the im-
mediate, future. His final remarks
amounted to a challenge to the grad-
uates to do something to preserve the
heritage which was theirs in the
country, government and institution.
HONORARY EGREES GIVEN
AT GRADUATION EXERCISES
(Continued from Page One)
his leadership of the American medi-
cal world.
Mr. Victor Fremont Lawson, edi-
tor and publisher of the Chicago
Daily News since 1876, was made a
docor of laws. Under his control the
Daily News has attained a command-
ing place in American journalism by
the range and accuracy of its foreign
domestic news and by its enlightened
support of decent politics.
General William Crozier, Major
General retired, of the United States
Army, a graduate of Ann Arbor high
school,. was also made a doctor of
engineering. Graduated -"from West
IL

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g, "minorities are not right just and a likelihood of genuine rewards
for unusual achievement.
se they are minorities. Some
ities are intolerable nuisances.I Another problem which must be
g a minority and becoming a solved, according to the speaker, was
onformist requires ixitellectual the divorcing the running of the gov-!
nination. If a man lacks it he ernment from the "schemes and in-
tter joing the majority. He I trigues of political parties or of
ier there. Joining a minority cliques, or individual politicians."
being married: it is not to be "Especially we must treat issues
d into 'unadvisedly or lightly; as issues," declared President Bur-
verently, discreetly, advisedly, I ton. "It is perfectly apparent that

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