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August 01, 1923 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-08-01

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ABLY SHOWERS
TODAY

-4I~ itia

i:DIatlj

rH J..~1J-
PRESS

DAY A-ND NIGHT WI
SERVICE

No. 34'

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1, 1923

PRICE FIVE C

RS DECLARlE
N'' S CRlISIS
IFELY PASSED'

"4
New Chapel.WillBe Social And
w_ eligious Center For Studlents

WELLS PLAgES 7TH

E R C.RTAI N T h A T
FROM ENE ONI A
AVE'lRTEI

1iA(LER1
isI

COMfLICATIONS ONLY
'BAR TO .RECOVERY
M"o. Harding And Cabinet llearcued
As Chief Executive Wins Fight
For Life
Presidential Ileadquartrs Pal-.
ace hotel, San Francisco, July
' R.-(By AX.)
Poesident hardlng- has pa.sed
the crisis and is on the road to
recovery, according Ito a state-
ment made late today to the As-
sociated Press by Dr. Charles
Sawyer, \the President's personal
physician. Dr. Sawyer said, "Since
we have our toxin well under con-
trol I am safe in saying that we
have passed the peak-load of
trouble.. I do not wan to be too
emphatic about it, because there
is always danger of complica-
tions but I reel that the crisis is
over and that the President is
well dn the road to recovery.
Presidential Headquarters, Palace
Hotel, San Francisco, July 31.-(By
A.P.)
"Barring complications, Prcident'
Harding has reached the peak of the
crisis," Brig.-General Sawyer, the
President's physician, said late today
after the formal consultation of five
attending physicians." Dr. Sawyer
stated that Mrs. Harding was well de-1
spite the strain.{
Outlook Favorable
Three cabinet members here, 'vere
likewise greatly heartened Secretary
Worl, who, as a physician, has parr
ticipated in all the consultations, said
late in the day that there was had
been nothing desquieting. The Presi-
dent's condition, he added, is either
favorably progressive or ' stationary,
and even the latter is favorable.
Secretary Hoover, who has been
optimistic throughout althought plain-
ly disturbed last njght, said that in-
formation gien him had been very en-
couiaging. Secretary Wallace likewise
was more hopeful.
The fourth member of President
Harding's .official family, Attorney-
General Daugherty was hurrying here
from Seattle and is due to arrive to-
morrow.
Washington Notified
The two cabinet members in Wash-
ington, Secretary Hughes, and Post-
master General Nety, were informed
by long distance telephone of the
change for the better by George E.
Christian, Jr., secretary- to the Pres-
ideit, and similar messages were sent
tq other cabinet officials, Secretary
Mellon and Secretary Davis, who are
in Europe. Messages of hope for the
executive's recovery and of !felicity
from his condition were more numer-
ous today than any ,day since he was
dropped here Sunday.
San Francisco, July 31-(By A.P.)
-,"The President is better."
These four words tell the story of
a light made today by Warren G.
Harding in a room on the top floor
of the Palace Hotel where he lies ill
with bronco-pnuemonia and several
complications. They first were spok-
en early today by Brig-General
(Charles N. Sawyer, chief of tile staff
of physicians attending Mr. Harding,
and hour by hour they were passed
on by word of mouth, by telephone,
telegram, and by radio until tonight
they had reached some of the farther-
most parts of the world.
All other information coming from

the President's room during the day
appear to support this early state-
ment.\ What tonight or tomorrow may,
bring forth one physician said "no
living Dr. knows, for it was recog-
nized that the fight Mr. Harding has
made did not end today. He is ad-
mittedly handicapped in his physical
-nn ;tmia on+ hcn hiheieliedtodayh that

The 'New Cathdiic Students' Chapel
'the new chapel will serve 'as a social as well as religious center for
the Catholic students in the University, with its club and meeting rooms
which are planned for the ground floor of the building. Construction work
on the chapel was begun two weeks ago. It is expected that they work on
the first floor will be completed by the opening of the fall semester.

FINACONCEROT TO,
'B E GIVENTONIGHT
Choral Union Will Present Last Event
of Summer Session Faculty
Concert Series
CHORITS OF, SEVENTY-FIVE
VOICES WILL PARTICIPATE
The Summer Choral Union under
the direction of George Oscar Bowen
will give the last program on the
summer Faculty Concert series this
evening at 8 o'clock.
Faculty Will Assist
The ohorus of 75 voices will be As-
sisted by Johnson Konold, soprano.
William Wheeler, tenor, R. Winfield
Adams, baritone; Emily Mutter, vio-
linist, Anthony J. Whitmire, violin-
played by Emma Fischer-dross, and
Virginia Tice. 'Mrs. Konold, Mrs.
Cross, and Mr. Whitmire are instruc-
tors in the School of Music, and ,Mr-
Wheeler is head of the vocal depart-
ment.
The program will open with a short
number by the Choral Union, and
ending with the chorale from Wag-
ner's Lohengrin, a truely great un-
dertaking, also by the chorus.
There will be a group of selections
Child Violinist on Program
liven by 'Miss Mutter, who is probab-
ly the greatest child-violinist in Mich-
igan. Miss Mutter will also play with
Mr. Whitmire in obligato to a song
by the women of the chorus. Mr.
Wheeler who is making his first ap-
pearance in the summer series will
sing a group of four songs. compos-
ed by Rachmaninoff. In the Lohen-
grin number the Choral Union will be
assisted by the three vocal soloists
of the evening.
The program follows:
'Out of the Stillness'"......Galbraith
The Choral Union
a. Scherzo-Tarantella, op. 16
............ Wieniawski
b. Zizeunerwisen, op. 20.... Sarasate
Miss Mutter
"The Snow". ..... . ............Elgar
The Women's Chorus
Violin obligato by Mis's Mutter
and Mr. Whitmire,
a. Oh Thou Billowy Harvest Field
,b. To the )hil'dren _

FACULTY MEN EDIT
List of iest Texts on Science Com-
piled for Use by School;
Libraries
DEPARTMENTS CONTRIBUTE
WORK; EDITED BY SMEATO1
$elieving that librarians in school
libraries do not devote the proper
amount of attention to science sec-
tions, and that it is a difficult ta-k
for the librarian to choose from 'a
mass of works the best reference text,
the members of the faculties of the
University have undertaken a compil-
ation of a list of science books, a bib-
liography which can be revised and
re-issued from time to time as new
publications appear.
Need for List Urgent
The list will answer a great need
in suggesting the proper books that
should be chosen. Members of the
faculties who have participated in the
inspection of high schools have ob-
served the dearth of books on natural

State AmiaPeur Champion Has Trouble)
In Puttingi Will Defend
Title Today
fHMflPDEN BREAKS RECORD IN.
VICTORY WIiI CARD OF 67
GnSpecial to The Daily
'Grand Rapids, July 31.-Carleton
Wells placed seventh in the state op-
en at the end of 72 holes Tuesday,
being first among the amateur ent-
rants.
Harry Hampden, finishing with a
record breaking 67 for a total of 293
I won first place. Wells' finishing round
was 74. D. E. Quirk and M. Crosby
linished lowest of the University of
Michigan entrants.
Wells still found most of his trouble
on the putting greens. His long,
straight tee shots' assisted in scor-
ing. His irons to the green were fair-
ly accurate. Play for the Michigan
amateur golf championship begins
Wednesday morning.'
REPAIR SADUMFOR
OPENINGGRID GAME
Workmen have started in painting
the Ferry field stadium in preparation
for the crowds who will attend the
home footbal games this year.
Four reserved seat games have been
arranged with Vanderbilt, United
States Marines, Ohio State and Min-
nesota in addition to the annual M.
A. C. and Case titlts and it is ex-
pected that Ann Arbor will 'be host,
to the greatest crowds of people that;
have ever seen the Michigan team in
action.
The gridiron itself is said to be in
excellent condition and everything'
is being prepared for the opening
whistle of the Case game on Oct. 6.
lZOOK IN SEMFFINALS
F owell Zook, '24, won his way into
the semi-final sof the Summer session
tennis tournament yesterday, defeat-
ing Reed of Hillsdale college, in
straight sets, 6-2, 6-3. Zook, who is
the All-campus doubles champion ex-1

Steve Is Star. In
Backward Jumping
Steve Farrell, veteran track coach
who is classed as one of the very best
cinder mentors in the country today.
is winning considerable local repu-
taton as a broad jumper. He has not'
only developed Carl Johnson and De
Hart Hubbard, two of the country's
greatest broad jumpers, but he has
time and time again defeated them at
their own game.
'Steve', though, competes in the
standing jump backward and takes
great pride in outdistancing all com-
ers.
PIONEER CLERKO
U NIVESTYQITS
Miss Lucy Chapin Assistant to Secre-
tary, Retires After 42 Years'
Service
WAS FIRST OFFICE EMPLOYE;
TO RECEIVE LIFE ALLOWANCE
After 42 years of service, as assist-
ant to the Secretary of the University,
Miss Lucy Chapin will retire Satur-
day on allowance for life in recogni-
tion of her continued faithfulness.
During her entire 42 years in the
employ of the University Miss Chapin
has asked for leave of absence only
once. That was in the summer ofE
1914 when she received a leave of
two months in addition to her regu-
lar month's vacation. She plans to
spend some time travelling abroad in
the future.
Miss- Chapin was the Airst clerk em-
ployed in the office of the University.
She entered as assistant to the Sec-
retary but as her work was not heavy
she soon fo'und herself performing
duties for the President, TreasurerY
and Registrar.
She was born in Ann Arbor and
was a desendent of those old pion-
eers who helped found the town and
who became leaders in the civic and
social, life. It was in the parlor oft
her great grandmother, Hanna Gibbs
Clark, that St. Andrews Episcopalx
church was organized and first com-
munion was served from her own sil-
ver tankard.t
During her service Miss Chapin hasc
performed the annual duty. of issu-
ing diplomas. She checks each one,1
sees that the seal of the University
is properly affixed and that the sheep-
skins are correctly rolled and tied.
Altogether' she has handled about 40,-
000 diplomas.
At a picnic 'held at Island Lake
last Saturday by the business force
of the administration offices she was
presented with a vote of thanks by
her co-workers expressing their ap-
preciation of her loyalty and unfail-
ing service.
EXCURSIONISTS ILL
TUR 1FORDAUTOPLANT
Excursion No. 11 of the Summer
session series will leave the Packard
and State streets station at 1 o'clock
this afternoon for "a tour of Ford's
River Rough plant. The party will
first visit the by-product building and
later the coke ovens. The railway
repair shops will next be inspected,
and finally the plant itself will be
toured.

The tour will end at 5 o'clock and
the return trip will be made on the
D. U. R. cars. The party will reach
Ann Arbor at 6:45 o'clock tonight.
Report Americans Slain in Mexico
El Paso, July 31.-Mexican corres-
pondents for newspapers published in
El Paso telegraphed that M. Marion,
an American who managed the Elec-
tric Light and Power company at Or-
izaba, Vera Cruz, Mexico, was stab-
bed to death yesterday by radical
workmen on the streets of the town.
Messages say police, state officials
and the military the hunting the as-
sassins.
Peking Gunboats Fire on Amoy,Port1
Amoy, July 31.-(By A.P.)- Two
gunboats of the Peking government
steamed in the harbor here Monday
afternoon and opened fire on the port.
The guns at the fort returned the

SAN

AN S5PEE[
liN AUMINISTRATIU
AEASED TOIIPEE

FRA NCISCO ADDRESS GI
OUT AS PRESIDENT
LIES ILL

BARS RECOGNITION
OF BOLSHEVIK GOV'T
Would Establish Peace With Central
powers; Hopes for Success In
Mexican Parley
Presidential Headquarters, Palace
Hotel, San Francisco, July 31.-(By
A.P.).
Sec. George B. Christian made pub-
lic tonight an address President Hard-
ing was to have delivered in San Fran-
cisco this evening at the Civic audi-
torium on the accomdplishment of the
administration in the international
field.
He said the view of his administta-
tion on pending international rela-
tionship respecting the United tSates
in the permanent Court of Interna-
tional Justice was the next major
step to be taken.
Bars Russian Recognition
Two pending international ques-
tions were discussed by the chief
ecutive. With respect to one, the
recognition of Russia, he declared, "in-
ternational good faith forbids any sort
of sanction of the Bolshevist policy."
The other question concerns relations
with Mexio and in discussing it Mr.
Harding said he earnestly hoped the
American commission in Mexico.City
would achieve definite and favorable
results."
Having in the past two and a half
years, as he ,said, "strengthened
friendly relationships and done much
to promote the peace of the world,"
the United States, he maintained,
should now do 'its part to bring the
blessings of peace and happiness and
fear of war to the nations of the
world. ."The nation ought no more
need resort to force in the settlement
of their disputes than do men in this
enlightened day. I would be sensible
to duty and violate all the sentiments
of my heart and of my conditions If I
failed to urge American support of the
permanent court of international jus-
tice."
World Court a Step Toward Peace
"I do not know that such a court
will be unfailing in the avoidance of
war, but I know it is a step in the
right direction."
Pressing his view of international
achievement with a declaration that
"When the present national adminis-
tration came into the responsibilities,
world affairs were in a very difficult
posture."
The President said four main tasks
were undertaken, as follows:
First, re-establishment of peace with
the central powers, and the orderly
settlement of those important after-
war problems which directly involved
the United States.
Second, The contention and com-
motion, amid the chaos of conflicting
international interests of the just
rights of the United States and the
legitimate interest .of American cit-
izens.
Third, the creation of an interna-
tional situation so far as United
States might contribute thereto whic
would\ give the best assurance of
peace for the future; and
Fourth, pursuit of traditional Amer.
loan policies of friendly cooperation
with our sister republics of the West-
ern Hemisphere."
Lands Hughes
"Eminent and far reaching achieve-
ments must have their ultimate ap-
praisal by American public opinion,'
the executive added, "but I submit
that we bow in restrained pride and
tribute to the services of a great
secretary of State.
Mr. Harding then proceeded to the

eunciation of international achieve-
mont, taking , up first the negotia-
tions of separate treaties of peace
with the central powers, and, which
followed as a necessity of peace ne-
gotiations by his distinguished prede-
cessor, 'fostered by lofty purpose and
undying controversy, the negotiations
resulting in treaties which establish.
ed peace with those countries on at
equitable basis and at the same time

science in the school libraries, and it
s perienced little difficulty in winning
i ire *....1nitt n e

iq in rPSnnnse to tnis neea tnaz cne

is n1 responseVl llo s U;41a Al
list is published.
The work of publishing and edit-
ing the bulletin was undertaken by
Prof. William G. Smeaton, of the 1
chemistry department. He was aid-
ed by other members of the University
faculty.
The introduntory general list is the
work of Professor Smeaton, the editor
of the pamphlet, the references whichI
come under the heal "Life Sciences"
were prepared as follows Agricul-
ture, Prof. J. B. Pollock and Professor
Smeaton; botany, Prof. J. B. Pollock
and Prof. H. I. Bartlett; forestry,
Prof. L. J. Young, and zoology, Prof.
A. G. Ruthven. The list, of references
which dealt with the "Earth Sciences,"
geography, geology, and mineralogy
were prepared by Prof. C. 0. Sauer,
Prof. W. H. Hobbs, an d Dean E .I1.
Kraus respectively, while the "Physic,
al Sciences," mathematics, astronomy,
physics, and chemistry were treated
respectivelylby Professors W. ,B. Ford,
L. C. Karpinski, R. H. Curtiss, D. L.
Rich, .and W. G. Smeaton.
850 Texts Given
Only about 850 references are giv-
en which are only a few of the pub-
lications that are suited to the needs
of libraries. The list it is believed,
owever, will give pupils an adequate
reference reading list with which they
can supplement their work.
The work is published by the Uni-
versity 'Extension division of the Li-
brary. Copies which are of particular
interest to teachers, can be obtained
in the office of the Summer session or
in the Library.
Suspend Sentence on, Belgian O icer
Brussels, July 31.-Lieut. Met Den
Anxt, who admitted in court that he
had assaulted Herr .Roediger, the Ger-
man charge d'affaires, July 9, was
condemned Monday to four months
in prison, but the court suspended the

ii

from his opponent, who was complete-
ly overwhelmed by the winner's chops.
Remaining matches in the quarter-)
finals will be played this week, Drey-
fuss meeting Sun, Jerome playing
Chung, and Oppenheim mixing it with
Davidson.
Play in the first round of ' the
doubles is now under way.
Park Department
At Work On Trees
Groups of workmen from the city
forestry department are at work
trimming ,all trees and making nec-
essary repair work. This work, ac-
cording to E. A. Gallup, superintend-
ent of parks, is done thoroughly ev-
ery three or four years.
At present a crew is working on the
section south of Packard street, b'e-
tween Hill and Main. Before the
summer is over, they will work' on
the grounds north of the campus and
east of Ferry fiell. If time permits,
(Continued on Page Four)
"MNaking Mountains
,Out of Little Hills"
is done away with by use of
DAILY CLASSIFIED ADS..
As your partner in business,
they canvass the town and.
and MAKE THE SALES thru
your own words without any'
inconvenience to you.

'i

.T Isle .---- .. Rachmaninoff
c. The Isle
d. In the Silent Night
' Mr. Wheeler
Choral Fantasia from "Lohengrin"..
..........Wagner-Fletcher
The Choral Union
Mrs. Konold, Mr. Wheeler, Mr. Adams
Contracts Let for Washtenaw Paving
Contracts were let yesterday for the
paving of Washtenaw avenue, accord-
ing to an announcement of the state
administrative board yesterday. The
stretch of road between Ann Arbor
and Ypsilanti will be paved with con-
crete. On the portion within the city
limits, about a mile in length, the state
will lay a concrete base on condition
that the city undertake to finish it

CALL
JIMMIE
THE AD. TAKER
960

fire.

'''I

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