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July 27, 1923 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

DAILY

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60 1tA

...

e To London

aces, foundry, body and tractor
plants southwest of Detroit. Trip
ends at 5 o'clock in the afternoon.
5:00-Lecture in French by Prof. E.
E. Rovillain in Natural Science au-
ditorium.I
S:00-Concert in Hill auditorium.
OF HIGHR EDUCTION

CISSEL DRAWS PLANS
FOR SYDNEY BRIDGE
(Continued from Page One)
Professor Cissel's plans call for a
parabolic arch bridge, the construction'
of which should cost considerably less
than either of the other two.

2:

The "Proletary" lying at the London dol
e "Proletary," first soviet trade ship to ply between Russian ports
Indon, recently tied up to a London dock with 400 tons of eggs. Dis-
g of the cargo was delayed when extremists among the dock work-
used to unload the vessel. '
AILY OFICIA BULLETIN
licati'on in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members of the
ersity. Copy received in the Office of the Smnmr Session un'il
une 3 FRIDAY, JULY 27, 1'23 N umber 110
i's Educational Club Picnic:
e annual summer picnic will be held Monday night, July 30, (weath-
nitting). Members of the faculty of the School of Education and
vives are invited. Tickets will be on sale Thursday and Friday in
i Hall. meet at' Barbour Gymnasium at 4:30 p. n.
BLANCHE HOWELL.
Ion No. 10, Put-In-Bay, Saturday, Jly 2:
you are interested in the Put-in-Pay Excursion please send your
to, or see the undersigned as soon as conveient, Room G 223,
1 Science Building, phone University 11. Special interurban car
ave Packard and State Streets at 6 a. m., arriving at Detroit at 7:55
The boat to Put-in-Bay will leave from the First Str et Dock, Detroit
m. The cost of the trip, including meals, should not be over $5.00.
J. P. ROWE.
ers:
e will be an important business meeting on Friday, July 27th, at 10
in Room 348. Professor Gram will give an illustrated lecture.

(Continued from Page One)
There is also a mania among thex
young people, ana some of the older
ones as well to 'get a degree'. Stand-x
ardization in this respect, said ther
Senator it extremely undemocratic.f
"Too many men," he said, "get their1
degrees, then seal up their think tanksc
forever after."
The question of "what is education"
was next discussed by Mr. Ferris. "It
is not .the amount of ground which
we cover, or the number of courses
we 'take', which decides whether or
not weare getting an education. E-
ucation is determined by what' a stu-
dent does. A single subject which
has been pursued in such a way that
the student has learned to-stand on
his own feet and use his mind in get-
ting and solving of its problems, pro-
vides a more real "'education than aI
whole college course in which one
has merely endeavored to appropriate
the thoughts of other men or tried to
become a thinker without thinking
about anything which seemed to re-
quire thought." Senator Ferris said
that we should teach .a few things so
that they will stick. The average high
school student hasn't learned to think
when he comes to enter college, be-
cause Mtis, mind is scattered all over
creation.
America Needs Education
In discussing the relation between
education of today and our great na-
tional problems, he stated that, Amer-
ica cannot hope to solve the great
problems of Democracy and World
brotherhood untilhshe' has learned to
really educate her young men and
women, rather than merely send them
to college to gain a smattering of
knowledge here and there, which 'is
forgotten the moment they receive
theirdegrees. Education has also a
big part to play in the salvation of
the American home, which is now in
danger of becoming disintegrated.
In conclusion, Senator' Ferris said,
"If we can enlighten, vitalize and en-
rich. the coming generation with the
highest ideals through our system of
education, some 'day the great Ameri-
can dreams will come true."
Senator Ferris was the guest of
Phi Delta Kappa, national honorary
educational fraternity, and was pres-
ent at their initiation banquet earlier
in the evening, at which he was the
principle speaker.

"The late growth of the Sydney
harbor traffic and the railroad busi-
ness which now has to go around by
the mainland has necessitated con-
struction of this bridge," said Profes-
sor Cissel. "Any type of bridge here
will involve a cost of from 25 to 30
millions of dollars."
When completed the bridge will car-
ry four lines of railroads, two main'
road ways, one motor roadway and one
foot roadway, and will be one of the
biggest engineering projects of this
dap.
Patronize Daily advertisers.--Adv.

- - - - _

Tennis

Racket Bar g ins

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WE ARE OFFERING
ANY RACKET IN THE STORE
-AT 25 per cent DISCOUNT-
"S UNIV E R S I T'Y
BOOKSTORES

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LAST SUMMER CONCERT
GIN NEXT WEDNESDAY
The final concert of the Summer ses-
sion will be given next Wednesday
evening by the Choral Union, a mixed
chorus of 75 voices. There will be a
miscellaneous program the princip-
al choral number of which is Choral
Fahtasia from Lohengrin, arranged
from Wagner's opera by Percy Fletch-
er. There will also be a group of
songs by the ladies of the chorus,
The Ann Arbor music lovers, and
especially the concert goers of last
winter, will be glad to know that one
of the soloists in the concert will be
William Wheeler, Ph.B., head of the
vocal department , of the University
School of Music, 'and director of the
First Methodist church choir. This,

CAMPING TOURING AND
',OU-TING SUPPL.iESl

concert will give Mr. Wheeler his first
appearance of the season. He will be
heard with the chorus in the Wagner
number, and he will also sing a group
of Russian songs. Miss Emily Mut-
ter who is p: >bably Michigan's best
child violinist will appear on the pro-
gram in a gr::u p of interesting num-
bers. Miss Muit ter and her teacher,
Anthony J. Whit'mire, will play a vio-
lin duet obigalto to numwers given by
teh women o tie chorus. The cher
soloists are Grace Johnson-Konold,
soprano, and R..Winfield Adams, bar-
itone, who will sing in the Lohengrip
number.
The Sumien Choral Union is under
the direction (f George Oscar Bowen,
head of the .u1Aic school music de-
partment of the University School of
Miusic, who ext'nds a cordial invita-
tion to the public for this final con-
cert of a most successful series.

We can furnish most of your needs which will
add comfort and also make your vacation
a real pleasure
A FEW OF THE MANY ITEMS'
Knickers and Breeches for ladies and men $2.25 up. Sweaters, Knit
Coats, Golf Hose, Puttees,
and White Duck Trousers
Palm-Beach, Linen and Khaki Trouser, Sport Suits, Hats,
Caps, etc.
o. D. Khaki, and/Poplin Army Shirts are neat and - comfort-
able for warm weather wear. Also iongee Dress and Sport
Shirts. ,
Rain Coats, Cravanettes, Ponchos, Rubber Boots.

1.

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/

E. R. ROBINSON, Pres.,
Summer Session Enginjeers.

IAT THE THEATERS

[AT'S GOING ON
I RIDAY
ome Problems in Secondary
1 Administration." Mr. B. F.
principal of the Nicholas -Seun
ichool, Chicago.
ecture, "Books and Manu-
s of the Fifteenth Century."
rated). Librarian W. W.
SATURDAY
a.-Excursion No. 10. Put-In.
fake Erie, under the direction
f. J. P. Rowe, of the Univer-.
t Montana. Return to Ann
about 11 p. m.
sJ-NOTICES
session students desiring to

u rse the Union Building this summer
must obtain card at'desk. Adi-
rectory of all students has been com-
piled.
JIONDAY
5:00-"The Developnient and Signific-
ance of Public Schools," by Prof. C.
0. Davis, in Natural Science audi-
torium.
8:00-Recital in Sarah Caswey1 Angell

Screen-Today

in
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Majestic- Theodore Kosloff
"Children of Jazz."
Orpheum - Anna Little
"Chained Lightni g."

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Tents

All kinds, in khaki or white, Wall Tents,
Pup Tents, Children's Play, Mosquito, and
Auto-Touro Tents
Diamond Edge U. S. Army .Axes
with carrier ..............
New Reg. Navy $j25
Hammocks...................

OF4
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hh R
r ' Y.. I

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hall by class in Shakespearean Wuerth- Harry Carry in "The
reading. "Kick-Back."
TUESDAY
50Q-7A Pictorial Survey of Qorean
Civilization," by Prof. W. Carl Ruf- Stage-This Week
us. The lecture will be illustrated.
9:00-Medical 'lecture in Natural Sol-
ence auditorium.
Garrick (Detroit) - The Bon-
WEDNESDAY stelle company in "The Gold
1 :0-ExcursIon No. 11 to the Ford Diggers."
pint at: River Rouge; blast furn-1

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I

0. D. Wool Army Blankets, Auto Robes
and Steamer Rugs
Gold Medal Camp Furniture
For-Cottage, porch, lawn, or touring. Folding cots $3.25 'Stools,
Chairs, Tables, Stoves, Grub Steaks, Folding Baskets, Canteens,
Duffel Bags, Auto Covers, Luggage Racks and Coverings, in fact
everything for Camping.

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udents pply Store
1111' SOUT H U NIVE RSITY AVENUE

Surplus Supplies Store, 213 N. 4thAve.
"It pays to walk a felvs blocks"

L,

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Dales Every Saturday Even'g

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11

BEST FLOOR IN TOWN

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TICKETS AT DOOR

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