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July 26, 1923 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-26

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ASSOCIATED
*PRESS
D)AY AN) NIGHT I
SERVICE

No. 29 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 26, 1923 PRICE FIVE

CHI6AN SUMMER
OOL 15 RANKED'
TH INS NUMBER

Remarkable Technique
By Haigh

Shown
In. Piano

Concert

Remarkable technique and the feel-1 ian atmosphere, combining the heavy
ing of a true artist marked the pro- Bach type with the lighter Hungarian
gram of Andrew Comstock Haigh, pi- theme. In this number the artists
anist, last night in Hill, auditorium. masterly technique was greatly in ev-
The popular nature of program and idence. His firmness and power in

'LO UUSUJEEP OUT
BRIDGEIS, WYOMING
TO~5TRAEE

New Secretary Of
Belgain Embassy

BRITISH 'POLITICS
TREND IS TUWARI
ALL ENGLAND INTERESTED
PROSPECT OF LABOR GOV.
ERNMENT
CONSERVATIVES HOLD
SWAY IN PARLIAME]

TUDENTS REGISTERED
UNIYERSITY SUMMER
SESSION

IN

INGREASE OF 250 OVER
ENROLLMENT IN 1922
Columbia First in Total of Students
in Attendance, With 12,62;
California Second
Michigan ranks sixth highest in the
total number of students registered in
23 colleges throughout the tcountry,
according to statistics given out yes-
terday by Dean E. H. Kraus, of the
Summer session.
Columbia appears first on the list
With a registration*or12,625. Califor-
aia, Chicago, Wisconsin and Minne-
sota follow. Michigan's total regis-
ration for this summer is 3,050, an
ncrease of more than 10 per cent
>ver the enrollment of 2.786 last year.
[owa, who was 13th in line last year,
ias reached seventh place this suin-
ner, with a registration of 2;425.
Harvard' and Cornell rank 10th and
L1th respectively.
Past Registritions H'ere
In 1908, Michigan's enrollment was
,085. Forty-seven per cent of these
id not return to the University dur-
ng the following academic session,
and 53 per .cent of the total number
were residents of Michigan. The num-
ber of students not returning t'o school
n the fall steadily increased around
.914 and 1915, during the war period,
)ut in 1918, there was a drop of 10
er cent in the number of students
not returning, due to the war.
In the registration list of 3,050 this
ummer, 948 students or at least 31
er cent hold degrees. Some of these
tudents hold more than one. One
undred forty-one hold degrees, six
old three degrees and tbree students
old four degrees. That makes 1,102
otal number of degrees in the Uni-,
'ersity this summer.
Bishop Lands Students
'The above figures bring out the fact
hat the character of the summer stu-
ent is different from the regular stu-
lent. They are more advanced and
nore serious minded, according to
Abrarian Bishop, who states that the
Abrary is used three times as much
y the summer students as by the reg-
tlar students. In 1921, the Library
irculation was 21 per cent greater
.nd the use of the study halls was 70
er cent greater in the summer than
luring the 'winter.
Pawlowski in New York
Prof. Felix W. Pawlowski, head .of
he aeronautical engineering depart-
nent of the college of engineering has
>een away from the city during the
ast week on business in the East.
M$s returr. from New York City is ex-
ected any time."
"He Walked
a Mile for One"
When a block would have been
sufficient. After canvassing
the town he .stopped at the
Daily office and found the room
he wanted. Moral:
CALL
JIMMIE
THE AD. TAKER
960

the mastery of the artist combined to
make the concert by far the most
pleasing to the audience of any pro-
gram which has been presented dur-
ing the summer by the, School of Mu-
sic faculty. The audience, although
small, was appreciative of the artists'
work.
The program opened with Fantasia
and Fugue in G minor, Bach-Lizt, a
mingling of the German and Hungar-
'BOYS'CAMP MAKES
5264 BY TAIG SAL

Enough Funds Raised to Carry
Work of Fourth Section of
Outing

on

BOYS FROM THIRD SECTION
HELP IN SELLING OF TAGS
Tag day netted the University Fresh
Air camp $264.58 yesterday, and sale
of Indian goods held in conjunction
with the drive for camp funds added
approximately $10 more to the total.
This amount, according to officials of
the drive, will. allow the fourth sec-
tion of the camp to be held as sched-
uled and will no#l necessitate the' cut-
ting down of activities at PattersonI
lake.
A truck load of small youngsters
from the third section of the camp
aided in selling tags' yesterday. Sta-.
tioned on the diagonal and in the
Arcade the representatives from the
camp sold throughout the day. Chief
Joe Donatus, Ottawa Indian, and
"Dad" Lockwood, naturalist, both of
whom are instructors in wood lore
at the site, aided in the campaign fog
During the day Indian souvenirs
made at the camp were sold in the
Arcade.. The camp, which realizes
approximately 25 per cent from the
sale of the goods, made about $10.
Small birch canoes, mats, porcupine
quill boxes and mocasins were among
the Indian goods for sale. These
goods can be secured at any time dur
ing the summerp atLane hall, where
they have been placed on display.
Papers& Concede
Turkish Victory,
Ldndon, July 25-(By A.P>)-The
outstanding tone of all comment in
today's newspapers on the signing of
the near east peace treaty at Laus-
anne yesterday is a frank admission
of Turkey's complete diplomatic vic-
tory over the' allies. The new treaty
nevertheless, is regarded by some
commentators as a good one.
Neal Took Campus Views
Howard K. Neal, of Detroit, who
was burned to death when his plane
crashed last Saturday afternoon, near
Windsor, Ont., was the phbtographer
who took the aerial views of the cam-
pus which are now on sale at the
Michigan Union. Mrs.. Neal piloted
the plane while the pictures were be-
ing taken.
St. Paul's Society to Meet
St. Paul's Young Peoples' society
will hold a meeting at 8 o'clock Fri-
day evening at 420 West Liberty
street. All students and nurses, who
are members of the church are invited
to attend.

executing the softer measures as well
as the heavier Bach chords made a
deep impression upon his hearers.
Sonata Interesting
Beethoven's Sonata, Opus 101, was
interesting with its startling melo-
dies and its haunting theme. Espe-
cially in Vivaca alla Marcia, with its
rapid succession of tarantella runs.
The Chgpin group was really the most
popular on the entire program, with
the exception of Ballad in G minor
which departs from Chopin's usual-
ly pleasing style. The other three
were characteristically tuneful and
full of life. Fantasie Impromptu, Noc-
turne, and Valse all are as interpre-
tative of life through music as Word-
swoirth's works are thorough poetry
-beautiful and appealing but never
deep in thought.
The fourth group is an innovation
in concert arrangement. The second
number of the group, Prelude in B
minor ,one of Mr. Haigh's composi-
tions, was the most enthusiastically
received single number of the entire
program. Just as the first group of
the program was distinguished chief-
ly because of its technique the last
body of selections was modern and
full' of feeling. Temperament and
superb execution of runs and difficult
measures were melted together in
Novelle, Medtner, Prelude in B Min-
or, Haigh, Two Preludes, Rachman-
inoff, and Etude ;Caprice, Dohnanyi.
Prelude in G linor, Rachmaninoff,
was given as an -encore, and ended a
virtually flawless program.
ALEXANERDEAN WILL
LECTURE HERE MONDAL
DIRECTOR OF DRAMA TO DELY-
ER SERIES OF LECTURES ON
PLAY PRODUCTION
Ailexander Dean, dAirector cf the
Little theater in Dallas Tex., will de-
liver a special lecture here next
Monday, it was announced yesterday'
by Dean Edward H. Kraus, of the
Smmer session.
Dean is a Dartmouth college grad-
uate, and while a student at that in-
stitution, took active interest in
dramatics. After taking graduate
work at Harvard he spent five years
on the professional. stage. One year
ago he joined the Dallas theater,
where he has met with a measure of
success. This summer he is teaching
a course in dramatics at Northwest-
ern university.
He will also talk before students
in Prof. -R. D. T. Hollister's class in
play production.
Chase Criminal 30,000 Miles
Cincinnati, July 25-(By A.P.)-A
30,000 mile chase through nearly ev-
ery state of the union by Walter Wil-
kinson, deputy sheriff of Huron coun-
try, Michigan, for an alleged fugitive
Paul Bern, 40, stock salesman, for-
merly of Grand Rapids, ended in Ciii-.
cinnati Tuesday.
Killed by Fast Train
Pittsburgh, July 25-(By A.P.)-
Edward Kunkle was killed and George
Bish injured when their automobile
was hurled by another automobile in
front of the Chicago limited, travel-
ing at high speed, on the Pennsyl-
vania railroad at a crossing near
here.

WATER FROM BIG HORN
RIVER IN THERMOPOLIS
Boonville Under Two to Five Feet of
Water; Trains Stranded;
Wires Down -
Casper, Wyo., July 25-(By A.P.)-
With unofficial estimates of the dam-
age placed at nearly $1,500,000 the re-
gin west and northwest of here ex-
tending as far as Thermopolis, is
struggling to get its head above the
flood waters which deluged -that sec-
tion yesterday.
The damage to the Burlington and
Quincy railroad . between Arxmingto
and Thermopolis a stretch of 80 miles,
is estimated at close to $750,000. Be-
cause wires are down most of the way
between Armingto, 35 miles north-
west of here, and Thermopolis, it is
difficult to ascertain the exact amount
of damage.
No Loss of Life
No loss of life is reported thus far.
The Burlington reports three steel
bridges out west of here and two
smaller bridges besides a large a-
mount of railroad roadbed washed out.
Several bridges on the Northwest-
ern railroad between here and Lan-
ers are reported swept away by high
water. Two Northwestern trains are
marooned near Moneta, a short dis-
tance west of here, with water on
each side of them.
Tourists Detour
All tourist travel is being routed'
via Salt Lake Creek and Buffalo to
the Yellowstone National park. There
are many bridges out west, south-
west, and northwest of here.
Water is rising at Thermopolis, and
many buildings are flooded. Water
from the Big Horn river, late reports
said, was nearly up to the top of the
rails at the Burlington d'epot, one
of the highest points in the city
The entire town of Boonville is re-
ported under two to five feet of wa-
ter.
Harding To Visit
Vancover -- Ship
Making Good Time
On Board the U. S. Henderson with
President Harding, July 25-(By A.
P.)-The Naval transport Henderson
with President Harding and his par-
ty aboard anchored off Canpbell Riv-
er, British Columbia, at ten- o'clock
today. Favored by good weather, the
Henderson was ahead of its schedule.
The Henderson will make a run
down the straights at Georgia and to-
morrow later steam into Vancouver
harbor to allow the President and his'
party to go ashore for a ten hour
stay on Canadian soil.
Working on. Address
The President continued to work
on an address he will deliver pn the
Pacific coast. He is' completing the
San Francisco address which will be
devoted to the destruction of foreign
relations including the World Court
and the accomplishment of the Wash-
ington Arms conference.
The detailed itinerary of the re-
mainder of the trip from the time the
President lands at Vancouver at 11
a. m. Thursday until he arrives in
New York on the'morning of Aug. 28
was made public today and shows a
scheduled week in California begin-
(Continued on Page Four)

Asquith-Gray Branch of
Survivors of Gladstone
Vote With Labor

Count Antoine de Labes in
Count Antoine de Labestia he just
been appointed secretary of the Bel-
gian embassy at Washington to suc-
rCed M. Jean 0e Fontaine.
SEVN CTS ARE
ON SPOUTLIGHT BILL
Annual Summer Performance Spon-
sored by Michigan Union to
be Held Tonight
"RELEASE" AND CIRCUS ACT
FEATURE NUMBERS OF PROGRAM
Seven acts of "big time" vaudeville
that will run all previous perform-
ances a close race, are what the man-
agers of the Summer Spotlight pre-
'dict will be held tonight. From the
light comic ,circus act to the one-
act play "Release," that embodies
"'deep stuff"; all acts are bound to
'please, they further claim
The fact that nothing but a large
spotlight will be used in lighting the
stage, the custom of former years,:
adds much novelty to the performance.
They are arranged in such a way that
they may be either directed upon one
section of the stage or over a vast
area. '
Seven Acts on Program
Five lively acts are scheduled to
be presented before the two culmin-
ating presentations, the one-act play
"Release," and the big circus act.
These preliminary skits have been
declared by those who have charge
of the Spotlight to be superior to any-
thing shown in 1revious years.
"Release," which was received with
such great acclaim during the past
campus dramatic season, will again
be presented and gives promise of be-
ing just as entertaining as before.
The^ performance tonight will be-
gin promptly at 8 o'clock. Tickets
may be secured at any of the 'State
street bookstores or at the auditor-
ium box office before the perform-
ance.
The complete program as announc-
ed follows. Starting off, the old cam-
pus favorites, Tang and Tavares, will
accompany young Miss Jean Seyfried,
who is well 'known to residents of
Ann Arbor. This little Miss will do
a toe dance in which she is exceed-
Prof. F. A. Saunders, who has just
(Continued on Page Four)
Rain Drenches Forest Fires
Muskegon, July 25..-(By A.P.)-
Several fomest fires in this section of
the state were extinguished by a
heavy rainstorm Monday. Prisoners
from the county jail had been fighting
a fire-in the Muskegon county park
on Lake Michigan.

RISING RIVER WATERS CAUSE
HEAVY DAMAGE, PLACED
AT $1,500,000

OF

In one of the most interesting le
tures of the Summer session progra
Prof. Robert M. Wenley, of the ph
osophy department, discussed t2
"British General Eelection of 192
and the gradual trend of British pc
itics to the left side of the house,
the Labor party, yesterday afternoo
He said: "It is a striking thing th
for the first time in the history
English politics that the Labor par
has been raised to the position of h
majesty's opposition in rarlihm'er
This result would," he said, "1
looked on with terror here in th
country. When we speak of labor-
this country, old maids of both sex
turn up their hands in terror and r
away. But in England, the situatic
is different. All are interested in t
'prospect of a labor government, th
do not fear it as we do. The Enj
lish laborer considers all parties a
primarily English. He thinks in tern
of the history of his country, and i
past life. There- is no break betwee
the people and the labor movemen
Personally," Professor Wenley sai
"I would not be surprised to see
labor government formed with Lox
Robert Cecil as prime minister.
"The "great increase of the lab
party is one of the most signflea
things in English history," he sai
"The English government or polit
cal life dates from the first \refor:
bill -of 1832." From that time, t
speaker declared, until the final dl
appearance of Gladstone from Brits
politics in'1884, is an era remarkab
for the great expansion of the i
dustrial revolution, the great growl
of the power of the middle classes,
period characterized by interest
working out the problems of the r
lation of the government to the ind
vidual. From the disappearance
Gladstone on, the great interest h
been the social problem of man's r
ation t6 his fellow. The labor par
hs been increasing steadilyN fro
that time, until now it stands as h
Mjesty's opposition. "There , a'
many parties nbw in the present pa
liament," Prof. Wenley said, "The co'
servatives hold the upper hand, a
in most matters are seconded by t
Lloyd George branch of the liberal
The Asquith-Gray branch of the libe
als, which is a survivcr of the o
Gladstone party usually vote with ti
liberals, or the labor party. The. I
bor party and the Mavericks,. wi
have no opinion and whose opinion.
not worth anything anyway, are ti
radical liberals. At present the go
erhment has a workable majority
65, which in ordinary circumstanc
is sufficient.
Cause is Apparent
"The cause of the great increase
the labor party is apparent," Profe
sor Wenley asserted, "when one co
siders the drift of the population
England 'to the cities. 80 per cent
the people of England live in citU
they are wage earners, and are n
turally liberals. The stronghol'd
conservatism is in the rural distric
In. Glasgow which is the center
Bolshevism in Scotland, 10 out 'of:
repreesntatives are laborites, in t
(Continued on Page Three)

I

The MICHIGAN UNION Presents.Its Annual

SUMMER

SPOTLIGHT

A T

H I L L AU D I T OtR IUM

EIGHT O'CLOCK

Tickets

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