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July 24, 1923 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1923-07-24

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U, 4 P

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TH-ER

ElIy SHOWERS
TODAY

Sir ianF

Iati

DAY AND
SEI

XIV. No. 27

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 24, 1923

Y PRICE

HENCH OCCUPIEDS
PREPARING REPLYE
OGLI NOT

S. A. T. C. Bulletin
Case Brings Back
Memories Of War
On the wall in the corridor of Uni-
versity hall hangs a bulletin case
bearing the printed inscription Stu-
d'ent Army Training Corps"
To those few students in profes-
sional schools who may have been
here in 1918, the little bulletin board
will recall the days when the stu-
dent body became an "army" over-
night and took its military orders
from the bulletin board in University
hall, just as it received the academic

PRNIST TO, GIE
RECITAL TOMORRO6W

MNllAg SCENE OF
POLTCLFIGHTl

Philippine Leader
Rakes, Genr. Wood

SHAKESPEARE El
ENDURE FORE'
'SAY'S ENGLISH
PROF. BOAS, 'BRITISH S
CUONSIDERS POET WOI
GREATEST WRITEF

Graduate of
Take

School of Music
Part in Faculty
Concert

Will

Wood-Quezon
Enibroglic
and

Trouble Stirs Political
Beti een Democrats
(; llectiw-fiss

'ARE
ESS

STA TES UNIVILLING-
T4 ACCEPT ANY
REVISION

ARTIST GIVEN OVATION BY
AIUMNI CV UB OF CHICAGO
Andre'w Comstock Haigh, pianist,
will give a program tomorrow{ eve-
ning in Hill auditorium at 8 o'clock.
Af-TFnch in "-rn fln r h

ANSWER TO LONDON BY
END OF WEEK PROBABLE
Premier Cancels Al'Enigagements and
Postpones Other Work to
Write Note
London, July 23.-(By A.P.)-
The secrfey agreed upon by the
Br'itish and French governments
concerning the reparations doeu-
menit forwarded to the Allies is
being closly maintained and it is
expected that another ten days
will elapse before any reply is re-
ceived from the French govern-
ncent, ogling to the delay in, the
meeting 9f Preir Poincaire
Premier Thunis to consult over
the Bri sh draft note to Ger-
many.
Paris, July 23.-(By A.P.)--Premier
Poineare who gave the British repar-
,ton documents received from London
late last week a careful reading Satur-
day, began a serious study of the
proposed reply to Germany. He went
over the document with several advis-
ers with a view to presenting the
whole situation to the cabinet tomor-
row.
Exchanges of views between Paris
and Brussels are going on actively
meanwhile. The reply to London pro-
bably will be made before the end of,
the week.
Poineare at Work
Premier Poincare, who is anxious to'
comply with the desire of the British
cabinet to obtain a prompt reply, can-'
celed an engagement to go to Rheims
today and put off all his other work
so as to concentrate upon ther repara-
tion question.
He has constructed an air-tight
compartment ar'ound the documents
received from London and it seems'
unlikely that anything regarding them
will leak , out until Prime Minister
Baldwin is in possession of the French
and Belgian replies.
Embassy Optimistic
The only indication of the trend of
the negotiations is the easier feel-.
ing in evidence around the foreign of-
fice. The optimism showi there, how-
ever, is regarded in political circles
generally as offset by the premier's]
speech at Villers-Cotterets yesterday,
in which he was considered to have
made plain France's unwillingness to
accept a revision of, the reparation
commission's estimates of Germany's
capacity for payment.

dictum in the class room. sir. naigh was a studentn ere in the
This relic of the "Army of Ann Ar- University School of Music, and he
bor" is the sole reminder on the cam- has lone work of merit in the world
pus of the days when students went of music, according to\ authorities
to, classes in uniform and everybody here-
washed dishes for fis board.C.
The bulletin board will undoubted- Chicago, July 23.- Andrew Coin-
ly be re-painted and used by some stock taigh, American pianist and
campus organization or University de- graduate of the University of Michi-
partment in the future butat present gan School of Music, was given a big
it remains a silent reminder of the ovation here today following a pro-
days when the University was a mil- gram given before the University of
iary camp. Michigan club.y
____y__mp._Haigh will mnake his debijt in New
Tork in a few weeks.

i,

MiKH11AN IKHA6U5 05
SMASH, 4 RECORDS IN'
DETROIT_ TRACK MEET
Four records were smashed and
another was equalled by University of
Michigan athletes competing in the
Michigan track and field meet in De-
troit Saturday afternoon. DeHart
Hubbard, dusky star on last year's
Varsity track team took first honors.
in the meet with three record-break-
ing firsts in the running broad jump,
220 yard high hurdles, and the hop
skip and jump, while Van Orden, stel-
lar weight man on the Conference
championship squad last season came
through with a first I- the shot put.
Edward Higgins, another member of
the 1923 Michigan track team took
first in the 100 yard dash and equalled
the meet record of 10 1-5 seconds.
Hubbard lowered the former time in
the hurdles event by 1 1-5 seconds,
bettered the broad jump mark by 8
3-4 inches when he'leaped 22 feet, 8
inches, and the old hop, skip and jump
record by 3 feet, 9 inches when he
went 43 feet, 11 inches in the event.
Van Orden esttablished a new record
when he put the shot 41 eet, 2 inches,
22 inches better than the former mark.
Brooker, one of the two best pole-
vaulters in the Conference last seas-
on and one of the most reliable point
getters of the Wolverine squad was
forced to content himself with a see-
ond in his favorite event when
Elmer Reich, competing unattached,
covered the bar at 12 feet, 10 inches.
Brooker also took a third in the dis-
cus throw, while Curtis Later, another
Maize and Blue representative, took
second in the high jump

SPOTtIGHT PROGRAM
By Nathan, Davis
"Release", a one act play by Ed-
ward S. Smith, is the lastest feature
to be added to the summer Spotlight
entertainment Thursday night in Hill
aditorium, At was announced yes-
terday, that this dramatic work will
be given with practically the same
cast that was used when it was pre-
sented last spring at the Mimes thea-
tre.
C. D. Livingstone, '25, and Edward
,Parnell, '25, will play the leads in
"Release". Both men were in the
cast last spring and made an enviable
record in their interpretation of
Smith's gangster characters.
Another act that has been added
to Ithe program and that should help
make this Spotlight performance ec-
lipse all previous ones, is the Wilson
and Weinman Musical Novelty act.
These two men will give a specialty
entitled "Cornets," in which cornet
duos by the principals will be the
chief numbers.

ILILIO GOVERNOR BLAMES
NATIVES FOR CONTROVERSY
Manila, July 23-(By A.P.)-The
split between Gov. General Leonard
Wood and Manuel Quezon, which re-
sulted in the resignation of all lead-
ing officials of the Philippine govern-
ment, has developed into - 1meal po-
litical partison embroglio with the
Democrats supporting Gov. Wood and
the Collectivista 'opposing him, ac-
cording to political leader here to-
day.
Democrats Oppose Mission.
The Democrata leaders today adopt-
ed -resolutions opposing the joining
of the parliamentary mission, which
is to leave for Washington, D. C.,
within the next two weeks to lay
the facts of t e Filipino controversy
before President Harding. Instead,
the Democrata: leaders favored a plan
whereby the regularly elected com-
missioners would be given full power
to lay the full facts before President
Harding.
Gov. Montinoa of Ilolio, in a state-
ment here today, places the entire
responsibility of the poltidal crisis
on Quezon and Manuel Roxas, speak-
er of the house of representatives. He
cites instances, he asserts, when these
men encroached on the prerogatives
of the governor general.t'a1
No Appointments Made
-Gov. Wood stated here today that
no offer of cabinet positions has been
made to members of the Democrata
party, and so far no Collectivista
members have been willing to accept
such positions. In the meantime, he
said, the under secretaries are carry-
ing forward the business of the Phil-
ippine government.'
WENLEY WILL Discuss
a19122 BITIISH ELECTION
"British Eletions of 1922" will be
the subject of Prof. Robert M. Wen-
ley's lecture tomorrow afternoon at.
5 o'clock. These elections, it is held,
are notable. (1) for the eclipse of
Lloyd George, (2) for the disappear-
ance of the Irish from the house of
commons, (3) for the consolidation of
the labor group, (4) for the appear-
ance of the first prime minister born
in one of the great overseas domin-
ions, and (5) for the disintegration
of the two great parties and the ap-
pearance of blocs.
Professor Wenley will deal with the
social, economic and political reas-
ons underlying these changes, giving
special attention to the labor group.
Professor Wenley's theory is that Eng-
land must understand American pol-
itics better and 'Americans must un-
derstand Englisl4 politics better or the
two countries can never understand
each other thoroughly.
Mexican Commission Begins Work
Mexico City, July 23-(By A.P.)-
Charles B. Warren of the American
Commission which is dealing with the
Mexican Commission' in- an effort to
solve points at issue between the
United States and Mexico said today
that the conference still was.confront-
ed with an important unsolved point,
while the necessity also existed of ar-
ranging an agreement upon the lat-
est but ninor .issues subsequent to
the solution of the main issue.

Warns Against Influences
Against Our Appreciath
English Dramatist
i,
By Robert J. Ramsa
Before one of the largest
appreciative audiences that
ed Natural. Science auditoril
fessor Frederick S. Boas, ins
Enlglish language and liter
' the London county council,
England, discussed the pi
Manuel L. Quezon "Shakespeare Today" last nig
Despite the protests of Manuel L. answer to the eternal questi
Quezon, resigned president of the whether Shakespe re would
Philippine senate, the war department clared in thne words of Colerid
has backed the stand of dov.ten. years have tried his plays, a
Leonard Wood in the incident which they have criticized them, t
has brought about the resignation of exist.
practically all the native officials.d Professor Boas is one of t
distinguished English scholar
subject of literature being
ber of the council of the R
ciety of literature. He is at
the University of Chicago,
brought here through the e
ILSTART TOthe English department. HI
last night was an uncomp
Drawings Made for University Annual defense of the great Elizabet
Summer Net Singles Meet; matist against the forces w
Doubles Followed tending today to filch the po
. 'has always held a's the pee
MERRIAM, DAVIS, DREYFUSS AND English writers. The speake:
ZOOK ARE -SEDED PLAYERS with the statement that it w
First round ysignificant this year that bc
Firt oun. play in the. University, land and America were cel
Summer session tennis tournament the tercentenary of the publi
will start today and continue through- the first folio of his works, a
out the week, according to an an- went on to show what influe
nouncement made yesterday by 14al at work today to modify th
Gessner, manager of the meet. tional reverence and admira
Four men, selected as the four best Shakespeare.
players in the entry list, were seeded Position Secure
in the drawing made last. night, to "There are several mover
provide more interest in the tourney the literary criticism of the
and-to ttempt to have the best, possi- which seem to militate aga
ble matches in the semi-final round. traditional view of Shakesl
Those seeded wered Milton Dreyfuss, the greatest dramatist," the
Charles Merriam, Howell Zook land asserted, "but when all is
Nathan Davis- done, his position remains sec
There will be no specific time for Jonson said 'he was not of
the first round matches to be played but for all time'." Howev(
except that matches must be played Boas went on to show that la
off by Saturday, or the player unable 'win, as collossal a figure in
to meet his opponent will be compell- field as Shakespeare was in
ed to default. Telephone numbers are lared that up until he wa
given below, so the players may com- years old, poetry ' gave hi
municate with each other more ,as- pleasure, but after that time,
ily. not read Shakespeare. "Dat
Doubles entries are being drawn at sents one type of individual,'
Moe's sporting goods store. Drawings sor Boas said, "he'is of a
will be made as soon as a reasonable scientist temperament that d
number of entries are received. analyze all truth and turns fi
-First round drawings in the singles liness-and beauty. This tyge
follow: idual has had a profound e'ft
'Dreyfus 751-W vs:.'Havenrack 100 our appreciation of the grea
W. tist."
_an 1U- s .Cun z-. a

WILL NOT Y IE]
CRITICS' ATTP

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New York, July 23-(By A.P.)
-Lack 'of political stability and
confidence. the nations should'
have in each other is bringing
the situation between France
andEngland niearer a crisis thhn I
ever before George N. - Reynglds
chairman of the Continenal and |
Commercial bank of Chicago de-
clared today on his arrival from 1
Europe in the Leviathan. He was
a delegate to the iaternationa\ |
Chamber of Comierce meeting -
at Rome. '
"Political stability and confi-
dence especially essential to any
successful relations is lacking,
and until England and France
obtain it they cannot hope to C
settle difficulties with Germany,"
he said. ' -

Girs' Club Meets%
Clarence Kingsley, high school in-
spector for the state of Massachusetts
spoke on "The Newer Teaching of Civ-
ics" before the members of the Girls',
Educational club meeting at Betsy
Barbour house last aight
Plans were made for the Club's ev-
ening picnic which will be held next
Monday. Tickets will be sold in Tap-
pen hall during the latter part of the
week.
Parliament Balks Limitation Move
London, July 23-(By A.P.)-J.
Ramsay MylcDonald, leader of the op-
position in the House of Commons
moved a resolution today in favor of
convening an international conference
to discuss the limitation of arma-
ments but the house resisted such
proposal 286-169.

LEONARiD TKErBU
EASILY FROM TENL
Yankee Stadium, New York, July 23.
-(By A.P.)-Bennie Leonard success-
fully defended his lightweight crown
here tonight by taking every round
with the exception of the first, in a
scheduled 15 round bout with Lew
Tendler, Philadelphia challenger, be-
fore a crowd of 65,000 fight fans.
Tendler, although he stood the 15
round; grind, and was still standing
that he has displayed since he be-
at the end, showed the worst form
came a serious contender for the light-
weight title. He was groggy in the
15th but the champion was unable to
land a knockout.
VITAMINES 'SUBJECT
"Yitamines in Modern Nutrition,"
will be the subject of Prof. Howard B.
Lewis this evening at 8 o'clock in Na-
tural Science auditorium.
Professor Lewis, who is the profes-
sor of physiological chemistry, has
been interested in this subject for
some time, and will endeavor to show
the need for the correct amount of
vitamines in food diets.

Tang 1211-W vs. Sun 2925-J.
Merriam 131 vs., Jerome 374.
Newman 1579-W vs'.OM'elia 3104.
Oppenheim 100-W vs. Van Antwerp
2545-M.
Mao 1837-R vs. Zook 713-W;
Davis 913-M vs. Gessner 732.
Brainerd 777-M vs. Wilkoff 732.
SCOTT' TO SPEAK ON
MARK_ TWAN:TODAY
Prof. Harold P, Scott, of the rhetor-
ic department will speak at 4 o'clqck
this afternoon in the Natural -Science
'auditorium on "Mark Twain and his'
Humor." a

Shakespeare's -Consero;
Tfe Anglor-Catholic mov
England, which aside from
ious character has for it
tie study of the Middle a
other influence which is dec
favorable to Shakespeare,
er went on. "Dante is tE
the Middle Ages with its
upon the spiritual, as Shal
the poet of the Rennaissanc
"Today there is an enthu
vival of interest in Dante.
olypse of the unseen world
appeal today than Shakesp<
orama of life from its be
its end. Shakespeare is to
human, his- interest is in
ial.
(Continued on Page T

R

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1 I--m

See the

UNION

SUMMER

SPOTLIGH'

o11

a

44 "

HURSDAY, JULY 26,

HILL AUDITORIUM, 8 P. M.,

TICKE'

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