100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 20, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-

u -in . r r

LitW

i.j

DAY AND

V

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 20, 1922

'RIKE

PEACE

PLAN

EXCHANGE CLUB TO
I CELEBRATE TODAY

:CK,

'ION OF
GANIZE

4

Today will be a gala day for the
Ann Arbor Exchange club, the occa-
sion being the observance of charter
presentation day of the local chapter.
Visiting Exchangeites to the number,
of 200 from Southern Michigan and
Ohio will be present, for whom ac-
commodations have been made at the
Michigan Union.
Members of Exchange clubs in the
University have {been' extended an
invitation to attend the ceremonies
(Continued on Page Four)
THEATER GROWTH,
Effinger Tells of Development oi
Scenery from Sixteenth
Century
STREET PERFORMANCES USED
TO ADVERTISE MEDICINE

FA
EFFORTS Sl
5 ETTLEMI
TO BED
ALL POINTS BUT
RIGHTS NOV
UPOl
PROBLEM IS P
STUMBLING E

Carriers
Not

Promise to
Guilty of Br

E CLEMENTS MEMORIAL LIBIARY BUILDING, THE EXTERIOR OF WHICH IS NOW COMPLETED TO-
GETHER WITH THE ROUGH WORK OF THE INTERIOR. THIS STRUCTURE WILL HOUSE THE
RARE COLLECTION OF ORIGINAL SOURCES OF MERICAN HISTORY AMASSED BY REGENT WIL-
LIAM CLEMENTS, '85.

CLEMENTS LIBRARY IS
,NEARING COMPLETION

Shakespearean Company To Present
Repertoire Under Campus Trees

ed." HE
r witt
tonight

.c

Presi-
rnoon,
t the
o set-

EXTERIOR COMPLETED; OTHER
DETAILS PROGRESSING
FAVORABLY
(By W. Bernard Butler)
With the exterior of the Clements

pours library completed and the interior
d decino work suggesting the final arrange-
was no
cannot ment of the plans, questions are con-
ion men stantly forthcoming as to further de-
endently tails. about the structure and the col-
fection of books it is to house.
rd from I n s .,
not be Italian Renaissance i design, the
ale the building covers a plot approximately
t Hard- 80 by 100 feet, rising two stories high
to take above a deep basement. The original
-plans for the facade have been chang-
and op- ed somewhat-.from the broad terrace

the Mich-
arrive in
where they
Ann Arbor
obile club.
heir annu-'
s, .and are
way to De-

I

with a colonade to a narrower ap-
proach to the pillared loggia.
Immediately upon entering the
,bronze doors, similar to those of the
new Detroit public library, one will
confront the main reading and exhi-
bition room finished in wood palen
work. The ceiling wil~l be deeply cof-
fered with lighting of the latest ap-
proved method. This large room is.
about 36 by 90 feet and extends two
stories in height to the roof. On this
same floor 'will also be located the
offices of the professor of American
history together with one for the cus-
todian so placed and fitted with glass1
windows as to command full view of
thXe rooms which house the rare
books for which this collection" is
famous.
On the second floor will be found
administrative offices where collat-
4ng and cataloguing work will be ef-
fected. Offices of the associate pro-
fessor of American history will 'oc-
cupy a part of tlis floor together with
a map room and cases contaiping re,
prints of valeible books kept for stu-

In a theater formed by a burlap
canopy stretched over the campus be-
tween the Library and the Museum,
the Shakespearean Playhouse com-
pany of New York, will give two
Shakespearean and two modern plays
on Aug. 3, 4, and 5. This 'company
is being brought here byethe English
department of the University, and is'
a part of the summer entertainment,
program.
The Shakespearean Playhouse, which
was founded by Frank McEntee in-
1918, is ais association of artists and
experienced actors for the production
not only of Shakespearean drama but
also for the best modern plays. The
press of New York City has com-
:mented enthusiastically on the pur-
pose and ability of this organization,
and newspapers in many cities have
endorsed this praise.
Mr. McEntee was for many years
an actor with the original Ben .Greet
Players, taking part in Ap less than
75 different Shakespearean roles. For
three years he directed the eastern
division of the enlarged Ben Greet
organization and' at the other time he
was associate director with Henry
Jewett of the Copley theater at Boston.,
Mr. McEntee is at present playing
leading roles in his own company
which is the one appearing here un-
der his. directorship.
Miss Elsie Herndon Kearns, one of
the company, was with McEntee in
the original Shakespeare Playhouse
productions of the "Merchant of Ven-
ice" at the Cort theater in New York
City. Miss Kearns headed her own
company on tour in a Shakespearean
repertory and last summer she play-
ed leading roles-with McEntee on tour.
Ealrier this season Miss Kearns has
been playing leading parts on tour
with Walter Hampden's company.
Aside from the individual excellence
WOW EN'S EDUCATIONAL CLUB,
PLANS PICNIC FOR TUESDAY
'Women of the University will be
entertained at a picnic to be given by
the Women's Educational club next
Tuesday evening on, the Island. The
committee in charge of the affair has
arranged to serve a picnic supper,
tickets for which may be obtained from
Kathryn Gunn or Esther Dunham at
Betsy Barbour house for 35 cents
apiece. Further information regard-

of the actors of the Shakespeare Play-
house cast, New Yolk newspapers
claim that the company is a carefully
chosen, well balanced organization
capable of presenting the plays which
comprise its repertory. The plays to
be given here, are "The Taming of the
Shrew," Galsworthy's "Pigeon,"
"Twelfth Night," and Barrie's "The
Admirable Mr. Crichton." These will
be offered at popular prices.
-
WELLS IS SURPRISE O
STATE -LF TOURNEY
Flint, Mich., July 19.--Detroit's"hold
on the low scoring honors in the qual-
ifying play of the Michigan. state
golf championship, which has endured
a number of years was broken at .the
Flint Country club today, when C. S.
Wells,'University of Michigan instruc-
tor and G. M. Guilbert, of Saginaw, a
newcomer in state 'golf circles sur-
prised the 200 entries. They led the
Worden Hunter, Country club, of De-
field with 75, one stroke'better than T.
troit.
Three other players got in with bet-
ter than 80. A. P. Quirk, from Wash-
tenaw, scored 78; while James B.
Standish, Jr., and A. Z. Lee, Jr., Loch-
moor, of Detroit and Detroit Golf club,
-scored 79.
It took 85 or better to make the
grade for a position in the champion-
ship fight of 32 pleayers, the best mass
showing in the history of the event.
Seven players tied at 85 and since
there was room for only three of them
a play off followed, Hugh Vaughn,
Plum Hollow; H., L. Johnson, Country
club of Detroit, and Charles Gibson,
of Muskegon, were the three who sur-
vived the trying ordeal, Vaughn get-
ting in with a par five on the first
hole while the other two won their
positions with three's by the short
second.
Worden Hunter, one of the earlier.
starters, held the lead with his 76 un-
til in mid-afternoon when Gilbert
slipped under the wire one stroke
better than the .Detroiter with 75.
DENBY HAS NARROW ESCAPE
WHEN 'PLANE ENGINE FAILS

(By Katherine E. Styer)
Changes in methods of giving per-
formances in the French theater from
the sixteenth century to the present
day were-discussed in connection with
a brief tracing of the history of "The
Development of, the French Theaer"
by Dean John R. Effinger, of the Lit-
erary college, in Natural Science aud-
itorium yeserday afternoon. The lec-
ture was illustrated with slides made
from the collection of engravings in
the National ibrary in Paris.
A minature reproduction of the me-
dieval theater taken from a picture in
"T.he Passion Play" given in 1574 was
shown. The scenes were all set 'on
the stage at the same time and the
actors sinply changed their positions
to indicate that the scene had shifted.
Street Shows in Vogue
About 1570, street performances
were greatly in vogue, but these grad-
ually resolved themselves into shows
in booths given chiefly for the pur-
pose of attracting the attention of the
passing crowds to the owner's wares,
patent medicines, "positive antidotes
for poison,"' and so forth.
Gradually all scenery was done
away with and the conventional set-
ting was a perfectly bare room with a
door in each of the three walls. A,
chair placed in the center" of the
back of the stage indicated that an
interior rather than an exterior scene
was represented. This type .of set-
ting was used for practically all of,
the plays of Corneille, Racine, and,
Moliere. No effort was made to wear1
appropriate costumes; they were sim-j
ply copied fromi those of the court.
The scant use of scenery at this time
was not' due to'the inability of the
people to produce the desired effectsj
but to their belief that it was im-
uroper; to use it in literary plays.-
Also, due to this attitude toward lit-
erary plays, there was very little ac-
tion; the plays were simply reelted.-
The practice of seating the audi-
ence on the stage slowly gave way to
boxes ,immediately above it, and
then to the present day system. The
announcements that the performance
would begin at "deux heures pre-1
cises" usually meant "4 o'clock, or
thereabouts."1
' "Matinee" Is Misused#
The present misuse of the word
"matinee" for an afternon perform-
ance was explained by Dean Effinger.
Originally the performance of the
day was given in the afternoon and
if an extra show was to be put on it
was given in the morning, "matin"
in French. When the system was
changed and the usual performance
was shown at night, the extra one
was moved along to the afternoon, but
it still retained its original name.
Blake Reaches India
Karachi, British India, July 19.-1
Major Blake, the British round-the-

er's

stat

the senior
stumbling
"There
progress
the shopci

(By Associated
Chicago, ,July 19.--Fe
forts to bring about th
.the country-wide :strike
shop men, was announ
ment issued tonight by
er, chairman of the
railroad labor board.
"As there does not s
probability of reconcili:
al views of the carrier
on the questions at iss
board and none of its
now engaged in any
along that line," the s
One Point Still ;
At the same time the
ed out that virtual ag
beenureachedvbetween
and the strike leaders
five points in dispute
the return to the strike:
iority rights-a questi
originally in dispute
roads and their men.

the labor board has
ferences with the :
but these have had
now at an end."
Since the strike
called question of
has arisen and has
importance.
The carriers cont(
when the men sti
owed to themselves
duty of continuing
the trains for the
freight, passengers
ing this, Mr. Hool
riers endeavored tc
who quit the servicE
they promised effici<
employment and. fa
the strike is over
off from these obli
"They also state,
tinued, "that to g
strikers preference
employed would me
recurrence of strikE
Senioriy
The carriers, he a
to employ men who
strike if they have
breaches of peace a
of property, but ref
seniority over those
ed at work.
"Personally," the
had hoped that som
be reached that we
resumption of wor:

wester
lic re
Railwa

plan-
et for

)m dents' use.E
rt, Provision is made'in the basement
ch for incoming books and storage, asf
on well as for a photostat and dark room}
,r- in which photographic copies of rare
books will be made and preserved for
EL. future generations. Extensive stack
ng rooms are alsp included, where com-
nn plete files of early newspapers which
0- 'form one of the richest phases of the
of collection are to be kept.
n- The building was designed with the
ge fundamental ideas of simplicity and
le usefulness in construction and beau-
ty in architecture. It will be a fit-
be ting housing for the collection of
er original sources of American history
s. which franks among the finest in the

1la

-. _ :.t.

ing the picnic may be obtained from Peking, Jday 19.-gecretary Edwin
Miss Blanche Mann, chairman of the Denby of the American .navy, nar-
executive committee . rowly escaped death here this after-
Following the supper, games will noon in an airplane accident. He
be played on the slope, of. the Huron was flying At a height of 4,000 feet
river. Agnes Campbell, of the Wom- over the Great Wall when the engine
en's physical education department, of the plane broke down. The ma-
will have charge of the sports. Later chine was demolished in landing, but
in the evening an outdoor sing will Mr. Denby was uninjured.

ers."
Feder
Annoui

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan