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July 19, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

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GOVERNMENT 010 NOT
RETURN ROASDS O OWERS
SAYS RAIfLY OFFICIAL
DECLARES "HALF-TRUTH WILL
NOT BEAR INVESTIGA.
TION

it
I
C
I
I

tory', wait for 'customers,' and make
no effort to distribute their productst
"People who scoff at advertising the
church and Christianity should re-
nember that four of the greatest men
to whom thefounding of Christianity
was laggely left were reporters or add
vertisers. They wrote the Gospels."
PROF. PETERSON GIVES CAUSES
AND CURES FOR CANCER
(Continued from Page One)
ber of casts each year, make it a so-
cial and public health problem. Since
the formation of the American Society

That chronic irritation is the cause!
of cancer is the prevalent belief among
physicians, according to Dr. Peterson.
Cancer of the lip is irritated by pipe
smoking. in India chewing of the be-
tel-nut causes cancer of the mouth.
Cancer in the intestinal tract may be
caused by hot and cold drinks, old ul-
cers and gallstones. As a preventa-
tive, all forms of chronic irritation
should be avoided.
FASHIONS PREVAIL IN BOOKS
AND CLOTHES SAYS BISHOP
(Continued from Page One) j

I

"Perhaps," Bishop answered, "but not
in our generation."
Fashions change and it is the li-
brarians privilege to view them, all.
"The librarian is no slavish follow-
er of literary style. He finds his
solace in the old-fashioned 'and the
new," says Mr. Bishop.
Federal Judge Nominated
Washington, July 18.-The nomina-
tion of James W. Wilkerson to be
federal judge for the Northern Illi-
nois district, succeeding former Judge
Landis, was confirmed late today by
the senate.

I.

(By Associated Press).
Spokane, Wash., July 18.-Many per-c
sons suppose that the railroads were t
turned back to their owners and man- ft
agers in 1920, but "this is only one of
the half-truths that will not bear in- k
vestigation," declared Charles Dillon,a
assistant to the chairman of the west-a
ern committee on public relations of o
the Association ,f Railway execu- u
tives, in an address before the Cham-e
ber of Commerce here today.
Mr. Dillon also asserted that "noth-
ing could be farther from the truth"
than the impression that the railways
"are trying to break down the unions,
and that they are eager to reduce the
men's wages."
"The truth is we have about all the
goverment in railroads right now that
the business will stand. It is the gov-
ernment which says what the rates
are to be and how much the roads may
be permitted to earn if they can do it;
It is the government which controlls
wages and it controls the conditions -
under which the men shall work. All
the reports are made and the book-
keeping of the railroads is done ac-
cording to the rules of the United
States government through the Inter-
state Commerce commission and upon
forms prescribed by that commission.
There is scarcely any item of manage-
ment not directly under the scrutiny
of the government at Washington or
Chicago.
Face New Order
"We are now facing on entirely new
order, a new labor condition. When
the United tSates Railroad Labor board
made the largest advance in wages
ever recoided, amounting, indeed, to
more than $720,000,000 a year,.the rail-
roads accepted the decision without re-
sistance. The men at that time did
not question the jurisdiction of the
board in making this enormous ad-
vance.
"The railroads promised, last Octo-
ber, to pass on to the public in reduced
rates " any savings in operating ex-
penses resulting from wage cuts.
Rates have been reduced since last
January $400,000,000-$265,000,000, ap-
proximately, more than wages have
been cut, based on the earnings in
1921, or $500,000,000 if we compare
with 1920.
"If total earings do not increase very
materially, the rate reductions and the
recent wage cuts will allow the rail-
roads about 3 1-2 per cent on their
valuation. There is a difference of
about $443,000,000 between this 3 1-2
per cent and the 5 3-4 percent which
the Interstate ommerce commission
says the roads may earn."
1,000,000 Must
Chew For layTo
Pay For Gum Ald
(By Associated Press)>
Omaha, Neb., July 18.-A certain
double-page advertisement costs a
chewing gum manufacturer '$11,000.
Rev. George F. Schmidt of New York
today told the thirtieth international
convention of the Walther League, an
association of young people's societies
of the Evangelical Lutheran Synodi-
cal Conference in an address recom-
mending church advertising. "To re-
gain the mere investment he must
sell 2,200,000 sticks of gum, and a
million people must chw gum for a
day to pay for it," he continued.
"Certainly advertising must pay.
Why, then, should we not do the same
in a dignified way, and advertise the
goods.or the product we have to sell,
salvation and personal peace, the
bread of heaven, the water of lire.

the sweet and blessed balm of
Gilead?
"It may startle some to think of
'selling' salvation, but after all that is
what every preacher and personall
worker does. To sell thekproduct of
your church, as much active work is
needed as to sell the product of any
factory in your community. Too
many churches establish their 'fac-

BARGAIN
COUNTER

F fifty Cents Each

Educational and
Otherwise

Of special interest to Summer School Teachers
and Students. .'. New titles added daily.

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES

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.

Ja,.. [
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- ';'I'
- ,

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I I1 X11.

for the control of Cancer in 1913, ex- audience as much as the authors
x the audcampaigssmtohpasulariaetthe
tensive campaigns to same the themselves." Pharmacy Bulletin Printed
knowledge ofcancer in the same way
as has been done with tuberculosis Periodical publication is the fashiont Officials in the College of Pharmacy
and appendicitis, have been carried of the day. These journpls are about stated yesterday that the bulletin for
on. This has been difficult because, five years ahead of the books print- that college for the year 1922-23 would
unlike tuberculosis, the cause of can- ed for specialists in particular sub- be printed and ready for distribution
cer is not known. ! jects. Will this,! fashion change.? today.
- --.-- ---- --- ---- --- ---- ---

VOICES
By Emanuel G. Frank

f

There's a wondrous thrill of pleasure
When you see the form and face,
Of some loved one in whose presence you rejoice;
But the joy there is in seeing
Can't compare with what takes place,
When you hear the magic music of her voice.
Be it mother, wife or sweetheart,
Be it sister,; daughte) , friend,
As within your waiting vision each appears;
While your heart may leap to see them
What is better in the end,
Than their eager voices sounding in your ears.
But remember as you listen
That these sweet and nameless thrills,
Find an echo and an answer rich and true,
In the hearts of cherished loved ones
Which alone your voice fulfills;
For when all is said, your voice is really you.
So when travel takes you from them
Let them feel how much you care,
Let them know you haven't left them all alone;
Let them feel in fullest measure
You, yourself, are standing there;
Let them hear the voice they cherish through
[the 'phone.

, f

4

MICHIGAN

STATE

TELEPHONE COMPANY

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Kenne dy's _____
All-Star Six
DON'T MISS
New Pavilion THIS ONE

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Four Mies from Y
the River road- Ti

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