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July 19, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-19

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THE WEATHER
GENERALLY FAIR
TODAY

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L, ilt i au

:43Arl

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XIII. No. 28

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JULY 19, 1922

PRICE 107V ]B3 C3

PRICE FIVE C

GOVERNHS ASKIED
Th"SECONO" COAL
RESUMPTION-ORDERI

PRESIDENT CALLS ON 28 STATE
HEADS TO APPROVE HIS
INVITATION
PLEDGES FEDERAL AID
IN EMERGENCY CASES
Groesbeek Among Executives Ap-
pealed to; to Review Situa-
tion in Person
(By Associated Press)
Washington, July 18. - Governors
of 28 coal producing states were call-
ed upon in telegrams sent late today
by President Harding to "second" his
invitation to miners and operators to
resume coal production and to give
them "assurance of maintained order
and the protection of lawful en-
deavor."
The President said he wished to con-
vey to the governors the assurance of
the "trust and full support of the
federal government whenever ancd
wherever, they find agencies of law
and order inadequate to meet the sit-
uation."
He added "our present duty.is to
guarantee security-in all lawful op-
erations-for that production and dis-
tribution demanded by the necessi.
ties of the American people."
Governor Groesbeck of Michigan
was one of the executives addressee
by the President.
Lansing, July 18.-Gov. Alex J
Groesbeck- tonight annouinced her
would go to Saginaw tomorrow to
personally look over the strike situa-
tion, as it relates'to the coal mine
well as the railroad shops. The an-
nouncement was made when the gov-
ernor was informed of President'
Harding's request to governors c
coal producing states, that they joir
him in his invitatIo to operatorF
reopen- their mines with support of'
the law-enforcing agencies of

M. A.C. PLANS TWO
NEW-BUILDINGS
Lansing, July 18.-The state will
undertake the cconstrudjon of two
new buildings on the Michigan Ag-
ricultural college campus, in an ef-
fort to keep the cost of the buildings
within the appropriations set aside
by the legislature, the state admins-
trative board decided today. A home
economics building and a combined
library and administration building,
will be erected.
State engineers estimate that they
can build and equip the two buildings
for approximately $800,000. Excava-
tion work will be started . at once.
TELLSIOF NCIENT.
WATER SUPPLIES
Road Enumerates Four Sources Avail-
.able to People in Olden
Times
AQUEDUCTS STILL STANDING 1
RIVAL MORE MODERN ONES1
"The. romance of history hangs'
about the works of ancient times de-'
signed for delivering water," said W.
C. Hoad, professor of municipal and1
sanitary engineering, in a lecture de-f
livered iip the Natural Science audi-t
torium yesterday afternoon. *
Professor Hoad spoke on "Water
Supply of Ancient Cities." These peo-
ple worked under conditions which1
today would appear insurmountable.

tSTATE AUTHORIZES'
NEW UNIVERSITY
PHYSICSBUILDING
ADMINISTRATION BOARD APPROV.
ES PLAN FOR NEW $450,00 0
STRUCTURE
START CONSTRUCTION
WORK IMMEDIATELY
No Definite Action Taken on Other
Buildings by Conference of
Members
(By Associated Press)
Lansing, July 18.-Following a con-
ference between representatives of the
University of Michigan with Governor
Groesbeck and members of the state
administrative board, the University
was authorized today to proceed with
the construction of foundations for a
new Physics building." It is estimated
the structure will cost about $450,000.
The entire building program of the
University was discussed at the con-
ference, but no other definite action
was taken.
Authorjzation of the construction of
the new Physics building will add an-
other important structure to the East
University avenue side of the campus
and marks another important step.in
the University building program.
,The Physics building will be located
on the campus grounds proper, on
East University avenue, directly op-
posite the site of the new Engineering
building shops.
The site of the building has been
cleared, between the north end of the
present Engineering building and the
Medical building.
Excavations for the new Engineering
buildings directly across the street,
are now in progress.
SURGEON DENIES THAT
CANCER IS CONTAGIOUS-

REGISTRY SHOWS
619 NEW STUDENTS
Advance registration for next fall
by new students has already reached a
total of 619, as compared with 380 at
the same time last year.
All of those admitted thus far are
students whose high ,school credits
have been accepted, and all applying
for admittance to the literary college.
Ann Arbor high school has the larg-
est representation, 93 graduates of that
school being among the accepted 619.
EXCHANGE CLUBS
GATHER TOMORROW
Two Hundred Members of Michigan
and Ohio Clubs to be City's
Guests
WILL CELEBRATE GRANTING
OF LOCAL CLUB'S CHARTER
Ann Arbor will be host tomorrow
to 200 members of the Exchange clubs
of the southeastern part of Michigan,!
who 'will be present to attend the cere-
monies of charter presentation day for
the local Exchange club.
Many of the larger cities of the state
will have representatives here for the
occasion, among them being Detroit,
Jackson, Flint, Battle Creek, Kalam-
azoo,.Grand Rapids, and also a delega-
tion from Toledo, Ohio.
The Michigan Union will be the
headquarters of the visiting delegates
during their stay here, with members of
the local branch of the organization as
guides to show the other members the
University and city./ Golfing privi-
leges have also been extended to the
delegates to Barton Hill Country club'
and the Ann Arbor Golf club.
A banquet for all the visitors will1
be held at 6:30 tomorrow night in the
banquet hall of the Union, reservations;
having been made for 200. J. W. Mc-
Kone, past president of the Jackson.
Exchange club, will act as toastmast-
er for the affair, while the address of
welcome will be delivered by Herbert;
Silvester, president of the Ann Arbor,
chapter, with Floyd Miller of Kalam-
azoo, president of the Michigan Affili-
ated Exchange clubs.
It is expected that a large represent-
ation will be present tomorrow, in
view of the fact that it is said many of,
the members of the organizations will
take advantage o this opportunity to,
inspect the University's building pro-'
gram.
All members of the faculty who are
also members of the Exchange club
irrespective of what city they may
represent, are also invited to attend
the ceremonies.

state.
May Increase Troops at Saginaw
Governor Groesbeck did not indi-
cate whether he planned to offer state
police aid to the mine 'operators; it
was considered probable, however,
that the executive might decide to
place a larger force at Sagihaw,
where diorders have taken place, in-
cident to the railroad strike, in an er
fort to prevent all interference with
railroad or mine operations.

MlNNN1MNWL O STRIKE, ASSURES LABOR CHIEF;
EARLY SETTLEMENT ANTIGIPAT!

4

Washington, July 18. - Replyingtc
a question late today, Attorney-gen-
eral Daugherty said:
"Naturally there is a relationshir
between the railroad and coal situa-
tion, whether inspired or conspired, '
am not saying."
John L. Lewis, president of the
United Mine Workers of America, de-
clared the President's nessage to the
governors "merely a gesture which
will not produce coal in any substai-
tial quantity" and asserted that the.
mine workers' strike would be con-
tinued. Earlier in the day before the
telegrams had been dispatched, Sam-
uel Gompers, president of the Amer-
ican Federation of Labor, predicted
in a statement that President Hard-
ing's invitation to the operators to
resume operations would result in no
appreciable increase in production.
He added that "when a half million
men are agreed is a poor time indeed
for the roll of, guns, the rating of
sabres and the pounding of the mailed
fist."
DOG AFFECTED BY RABIES
4TTACKS FACULTY 1EMBER
Dr. Herbert W. Emerson, head of the
Pasteur institute of the University
Mgedical school, declared yesterday that
what is said to be the first case of
rabies in Ann Arbor was reported to
him Monday afternoon, when a dog af-
fected by rabies attacked and bit a
faculty member and also an employee
of the University hospital Saturday
afternoon. The dog died early Monday
morning.

There were no pumping engines orf
steam plants for forcing the water, and
even pipes made from boring out logs
were then unknown.
Names Four Sources
Professor Hoad ennumerated four
sources of water supply known in an-
cient times. Springs commonly called
fountains were the most usual means
of securing water. But with the growth,
of city life, this source became inade-
quate.
Wells or the art of collecting ground
water by mechanical as well as me-
chanical labor was early developed to
an astounding degree. Among the most
common of these is Joseph's well in
Cairo which reached a depth of 297
feet. , Stereoptican views were shown
of this and many of the other wells
'familiar in Bible and Roman history.
Giant Acqueducts Built
Reservoirs holding as many as four
or five million gallons with channels
of cement rivaling those used today
were built 300 years B. C.
The last developed source of water
supply, was the acqueduct which is
the means of supply of the ancients
best known to us. Many of these old
aqueducts are standing today. The
scenic effect of Pont du Gard, one-of
the highest and most interesting of the
Roman ruins, is conspicuous to the
tourist of Southern France. Professor
Hoad showed slides of this as well as
of the Claudia and Anio Novus aquer
ducts supplying water to Rome at
the period of the Empire's greatest
height.
Tunneling through solid rock was
done in the time of Hezekiah. Outside
of the city of Jerusalem there is a
tablet which was struck at the time
of the completion of the first tunnel
telling of the workmen calling to each
other across the rock separating them.
"The interesting fact about this," Pro-
fessor Hoad pointed out, "is that, as
today, the tunneling was begun from
each end working toward the center."
SCHOOL AMENDMENT DEAD
ISSUE FOR FALL ELECTION
Detroit, July 18/- With the cer-
tainty that the proposed amendment
to the state constitution, requiring all
children of school age to attend the
public schools, will not be submit-
ted to the state's voters at the No-
vember election, interest in the pri-
Mary campaigns now centers in the
three cornered Republican race for
Ulnited States senatoi.
The proposed amendment, known as
the anti-parochial school measure,
was withheld for the election next
spring. This measure was expected to
vie with the senatorial race for in-

COERCION CHARGED
IN SENATE DEBATE
Washington, July 18.-A charge by
Senator Lenroot, Republican, Wis-
consin, that threats to slash rates in
the agricultural schdule had been
used in an effort to keep Republican
senators in line on rates in the cot-
ton schedule of the pending tariff
bill, enliaened senate debate today
on that measure. In this connection
Senator Penroot took to task /some
of his colleagues for what he termed
"blindly joliowing" the finance com-
mittee majority on rates in the bill,
urging that they form "independen
judgment."
After his charge about the threats,
Senator Lenroot offered an amend-
ment to make the rate of knit cotton
under way, 45 per cent instead of
50 and it was approved 28 to 27, with
11 Reuphilcans supporting it. This
was the only case in which the com-
mittee was overturned today.
DICKENSON AND
WHEELER TO GIVE
FACULTY CONCERT
An important change has been made
in the program of the complimentary
faculty concert which will be given
in Hill auditorium tonight at 8
o'clock in that Miss Winifred Dickin-
son, organist, and Mr. William Wheel-
er, tenor, will participate .instead of
the musicians previously announced.
Miss Diekinson is a graduate of'the
School of Music and has appeared
freuently in recital. She is an organ-I
ist of unusual ability and the future
holds bright promises for her. Con-I
cert patrons who heard Mr. Wheeler
a week ago will be delighted at the
opportunity to hear him again.
The 'following program will be
given:
Chaconne, Angelus Du Soir,
Ariel.................Bonnet
Miss Winifred Dickinson
Come Raggio di Sol ........Caldara
Vezzosetto e care ........Falconieri
Amarilli mia Vella ..........Caccini
'Per la gloria ...........Bonconcini
Mr. William Wheeler
The Bells of St. Anne De Beau-
phre ....................Russell
Symphony No. 2 ...............Widor
Pastorale
Finale
Miss Winifred Dickinson
Transformation ..............Manney
My Soul Is Like a Garden Close'
.Class
Smugglers' Song .........Kermochan
The Little Fisherman ........Lane
Stainless Soldier on the Wall
..... Dickinson
Mr. William Wheeler
Mrs. George B. Rhead, Accompanist
Fashions Prevail
In Books, Clothes
Says Librarian

GRAYBOLD.. UNION HEAD, AS
SERTS MEN WILL NOT LEAVE
POSTS
PENNSYLVANIA LINES
MAKE WAGE AGREEMEN
Jewell Will Hold Out for Restoratioi
of Full Seniority Rights to
Striking Shop Men
(By Associated Press)
BULLETIN
Detroit, July 18.-The Pere Mar-
quette road annuled six passenger
trains in Michigan today, due, it
was announced, to the coal strike
and the shopmen's strike.
Chicago, July 18.-With E. S. Gray
bold, president of the maintenance o
way union, asserting that he did no
expect his men to leave their work
conferences looking toward .4 peace
ful settlement of the shop men's striki
continued today.
Announcement by the Pennsylvani
railroad that a mutually satisfactor
wage agreement had been reached wit]
its shop men was considered by som
railroad and union leaders to have ha
a clarifying effest on the entire sit
uation, in as much as the Pennsylvan
ia has insisted in dealing with its owl
men./
Expect Early' Adjustment
Mr. Graybold issued a statement to
night asserting that "the path to a
early adjustment isopen" so far asft
400,000 members of his organizatio
are concerned. Referring to his con
ference with President Harding las
Week, Mr. Greybold said he had receiv
ed assurance that Chairman Cummin
of interstate commerce conimission
expected to hold early hearings on dis
puted points of the labor provision o
the transportation act, particularl
with reference to the wage principle.
"The basis for the guidance of the
board in the present act is to set "a
just and reasonable wage," Mr. Gray
bold's statement said. "The presen1
issue which should be settled by suc
a hearing by the interstate commerc
committee of the senate and amend-
ments to the law, is an interpretatior
of this phrase just and reasonable and
its application. to a living wage."
Mr. Graybold said that a peacefu:
settlement of the shop men's strik
was being held uTp by a few heads
who were unwilling to allow return
ing employees their seniority rights.
Jewell, Obdurate
The railroads in ultimatums to th
strikers, said unless they returned t
work by certain dates, all of whic
have now expired, they would star
in again as new employees. frhey ar
supported in their stand .by proclam
ations issued by the labor board.
On the other hand, Pres. B. M. Jew.
etlI, an his striking shop men, have
asserted that any settlement must b
predecited on a full restoration of sen
tority rights to the returning strfkers
Georgia national guard companie
were sent to Waycroff today Because
of strike disorders and North arolinu
troops were held in rediness for ar
emergency. Fresh troops were mobi
ized i , Illinois to replace those o
duty at Bloomington and Clinton.
NEW YORK MINISTER ACCEPTS
CALL TO LOCAL PASTORATI
Announcement' has been made o
the acceptance by Rev. Henry Lewis
pastor of the Trinity church of New
York City, of the pastorate of St. An

drew's Episcopal church here, to suc
cued Rev. Henry Tatlock, wko resigner
in June, 1921.

PROFESSOR PETERSON SPEAKS ON
CAUSES AND CURES OF MAL-
IGNANT ILL
"Two questions that are invariably
asked about cancer," said Prof. Reuben
Peterson, of the Medical college last
night in his lecture on "Important
Facts About Cancer," "are 'What
causes it,' and 'Can it be cured?'"
In answer to the first question, Dr.
Peterson said that the cause of cancer
is not known. Cancer is a tumor made
up of cells which have a malignant
growth. They multiply rapidly, push-
ing into the neighboring tissue and
destroying it. These cells, he said,
are carried by lymphatics throughout
the body, if not arrested in the early
stage of their growth.
Cure Possible
"Can cancer be cured ?" The answer
to this question is "Yes," according to
the speaker. Cancer is a local disease.
It is seldom discovered in the early
stage, being microscopic in size. If
removed in the early stage it will not
return. If, however, it has spread
there is less hope.
Nevertheless, the speaker said, peo-
ple are more or less skeptical about
perations for cancer. The reason that
so many deaths occur is because oper-
ation has been made too late.
So far, said Dr. Peterson, the knife
is the only sure cure for cancer. Rad-
ium treatments have not been success-
ful, although the possibilities of rad-
ium must not be disparaged. Radium
cannot displace surgical operations,
except in cases of skin cancer, but
It will be a valuable supplement. Far
more effective in treatment of cancer
,has been the high-tension X-ray, whose
powers of deep penetration, and de-
struction of malignant tissue in places
inaccessible to the knife, make it in-i
valuable. The University hospital is
soon to be supplied with oue of these
machines.
Warns Against Fakers
"The public must be warned against
radium fakers," said Professor Peter-
son, "they are more often after the
money than after a cure."
The great spread of cancer through-
out the world and the increasing num-
(Continued on Page Four)

PILLSBURY TO ECTURE
IN FRENCH COLLEGSS
WILL SPEND A YEAR SPEAKING
TO STUDENTS OF EIGHT
UNIVERSITIES
Dr. Walter B. Pillsbury, professor
of psychology and director of the psy-
chological laboratory, will leave the
first of August for France where he
will be for the coming year. Besides
lecturing at Sorbonne, the University
of Paris, Professor Pillsbury will give
a series of lectures at the universities
of Bourdeaux, Lyons, Grenoble, Besan-
con, Strasburg, and Monpelier.
Dr. Pillsbury will give all of his lec-
tures in French. Inasmuch as his
work at the University of Paris be-
gins the second semester, until next
January, Professor Pillsbury will be
at the University of Toulouse where
he will prepare his lectures. From
there he will go to Paris where he
will take up residence until the end
of the school year, returning to Ann
Arbor the following August.
Dr. Henry F. Adams, associate pro-
fessor of psychology, will act as head
of the department of psychology dur-
ing Professor Pillsbury's absence.
Professor Adams will give the lectures
in course 7.
Dr. Charles H. Griffitts will give
course 8 next year. Dr. E. B. Skaggs,
of Ohio Wesleyan university, is com-
ing here to take the place of John
D. Finlayson an instructor in the de-
partment this year.

Fashions reign in books as well 'as
in women's clothes, says William W.
Bishop, librarian of the University, in
a May Day address before the Wiscon-
sin Library school, which. has just
been reprinted from a Wisconsin pub-
lication. Mr. Bishop then traced the
fashions in writing materials from the
stone tablet through the hand illum-
inated page to the printed sheet.
Just as styles of dress go on chang-
ing, books continue to follow the fash-
ion' of the age in shape and size and
outward appearance, Librarian Bis-
hop pointed out. Changes in printing
processes have caused a great deal of
the changes found in book making.
Most notable among the changes has
been the lack of variety since the ap-
pilcation of steam to printing.
"In surveying book fashions, literary
styles and modes, the librarian can-
not confine himself to the great exem-
plars of the centuries. After all we
are concerned," Bishop declared, "with
(Continued on Page Four)

Chinese War Begins A
Canton, . China, July 18. -
leading the troops of Dr. f
Sen, deposed president o
China, and those command
supporters of Chen Chiung-I
overthrew Sen, are massir

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