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July 18, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-18

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'umm r

AND WARME1R
TODAtY

A6V A6V
an

tl

DAY

-- - , : ..-ter.:

..

No. 22

I

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 18, 1922

,:

19 TO ATTEND
ION MEET HERE
'TEMBER 5 - B

NVTNTION
AUSPICES
POST

TO BE HELD
OF LOCAL

RTON, JUDGE LANDIS
EXPECTED T O SP E AK,
bour Gymnasium to be Used for
Banquet; State Posts to Join
in Parade
:n Arbor will be the meeting place
ome 2,500 delegates when the Am-
an Legion posts of Michigan hold
r annual convention here Sept. 5
6, under the auspices of the Irwin
skhorn post, No. 46, Ann Arbor.
. F. N. Menefee, of the engineer-
mechanics department, is com-
der of the Post. Among the events
.ned are a big parade, an address
udge Kenesaw M. Landis, of Chi-
, and a banquet in Barbour gym-
um.
To Meet in Hill Auditorium
he meeting proper of the conven-
will be held in Hill auditorium.
des the address by Judge Landis,
Post hopes to have President
ion L. Burton address the conven-
President Burton has given his
:lation.
rangements are being made to
nmodate 1,500 at the banquet,
h will be held after the meeting.
Evans Holbrook, president of
Alumnae council of the Alumnae
ciation, has charge of the serving
ngements, the profit of which will
o the Michigan league. The en-
inment program for the banquet
. the hands of Prof. J. A. C. Hild-
of the German department.
Seeks Accommodaitons
Le hardest problem which the Post
to solve was finding accommoda-
for the 2,500 delegates who will
td. Many of the fraternity houses
he city have volunteered to take
of a number of the guest§. The
ten's auxiliary, which will also
td, will be accommodated in the
ha Cook, Betsy Barbour, and Ad-
Cheever houses.

OPERA STARS. TO BE
SEEN IN SPO't LIGHT
At least two of the stars of foymer
Michigan Union Operas will be seen
in action in the Union Summer Spot-
light, which will be given July 27 in
Hill auditorium.
These two men took" prominent
parts as female impersonators ir
"Make It for Two", the most preten-
tious production ever produced by
University talent.
The Spotlight committee would n,
divulge the names of the men until
the acts for the program have been
decided upon, bitt promiser that the:'
would appear in entirely new
original dance and dialogue acts.
REEL REPORTEDi "
CONTRO LLI NGCORK
Troops Billeted with Civilians; De-
struction, Pillage Break Out;
Port Closed
NATIONAL ARMY REPORTS3
CAPTURE OF FIVE HUNDRED

'STATE OFFICERS
KEEP MINE PEACE'
AFTER KILLINGS
FOUR KNOWN DEAD, OTHER CAS.
UALTIES REPORTED IN
FIGHT AT DAWN
PRESIDEN4T ASKS HEADS
-"O RESUME OPERATIONS
"Invitation" Interpreted as Hinting
Possibility of Operation with
Military Protection
(By Associated Press)
Wellsburg, W. V., July 17.-A strong
force of deputy sheriffs and state pol-
ice tonight kept the peace in the little
village of Clintonville, ten miles from
here, while the bodies of Sheriff IH.
Buval and three other men lay in, the
morgue, silent testimony of the fight
which raged in the hills around the
non-union Clinton mines when it was
attacked by men said to be from the
union field across the line in Penn-
sylvania, soon after dawn today.
Watchers at the mine were wait-
ing for the ruins of the tipple, burn-
ed in the attack, to cool before search-
ing for bodies of two nen believed to
be buried under the debris.'
Additional Killings Rumored
Rumor persisted that the bodies, in
the morgue by no means represented
the total casualties of the fight, but non6
of the deputies would confirm reports
that men had been shot down and
their bodies dragged through the
woods by their companions.
Three wounded men of the attack-
ing force were in hospitals in Wheel-
ing and 13 others, captured by de-
puties in the battle, were In an Ohio
county jail not far away. .
Nine prisoners, three of whom had
been shot, were in the Wellsburg jail.
Seven of this number had been taken
in the woods around the Clinton mines
late this afternoon by state policemen,
who, it was reported tonight, were
continuing the search.

Professor Van Tyne, hack From India
Discusses Its Government 1/or Atlantic

oo, STATLER,
CTS F NEXT TR

(By Associated Press)
Belfast, July 17.-Reports reaching
here today represent the city of Cork
as suffering grievously at the hands. of
the Republican insurgent forces, said
to be in absolute control. The port of
Cork has been closed, it is said, and
business premises seized and their
contents appropriated. Many of the
troops are billeted with civilians and
several thousand are out of work.
Moreover, there has been an out-
break of robbery and destruction, ac-
cording to refugees, who say the
trouble began about the time of the
attack on the Four Courts in Dublin
and was initiated by young men froni
the country, who entered the city and
started an orgy of looting and wanton
destruction, devoting particular atten-
tion to property of Protestants.
After the fall of the Four Courts,
the irregulars patrolled the streets in
armored cars, suppressing all public
expressions of opinion in favor of the
Free State. The Free State forces,
overwhelmingly outnumbered, did not
oppose them.,
Report 500 Rebels Captured
. Dublin, July 17.-During week end
operations, the National army troops
captured about 500 prisoners from the
Republican insurgents, it was report-
ed today. They included 300 captur-
ed at Dundalk, 70 at Collooney; 54 in
North Tipperary and 21 in County
Donegal.
National army troops from Mulling-
ar, operating near Kinnegad, this
morning captured 12 irregulars in a
deserted mansion. Rifles and large
stores of ammunition were seized.
The publicity department of the
Irish irregular army announced that
Eamonn de Valera is at field head-
quarters serving on the staff of the di-
rector of operations. It is believed
headquarters has been transferred
from Mallow to Limerick.
Govve'rnment Issues Manifesto
The Provisional government reaf-
firmed its determination to suppress,
the revolt and in a manifesto address-
ed to the Commander-in-Chief Michael
Collins and the men of the army, it
says in part:
You have been entrusted with
supreme command of the Nation-
al army, and, with Generals Mul-
cahy and O'Duffy, have been con-
stituted a general war council.
The army, which recently freed
the country from foreign tyranny,
must again resist the attempts of
qa armed minority. The Irish
army is fighting for the same prin-
ciple as when it fought the Brit-
ish, namely the right of the Irish
people to be masters in their own
country.
(Continued on Page Four)

"India in Ferment" is the subject of
an article in the Atlantic Monthly of
July by Prof. C. H. Van Tyne, of the
history, department. Professor Van
Tyne returned recently from that
country where he made a study of
governmental affairs.
Under the Government of India Act
of 1919, India is governed by a legis-
lative asembly, which represents, the-
oretically, the people, and a council of
State, which acts as a kind of upper
house, and cabinet in conjunction with
the governor. Two features of the In-
dian government which are peculiar to
it, and hard for Americans to compre-
hend are communal representation
and what is known as "dyarchy."
By communa representation is
meant representation by interests in-
stead of territorial division as in Am-
erica. Sikhs, Parsis, non-Brahmins,
Mohammedans, European business in-
terests, etc., are represented in the
Assembly, wholly out proportion to
their importance.
Professor Van Tyneattended a ses-
sion of the legislative assembly, which
follows the traditions of the British
House of Commraons. About one-third
of the representatives were present.
Some were afraid, having voted
against the government, some did not
wish to commit themselves, some
were unwilling to sacrifice private
business to public affairs, and some
were merely disgusted with the whole
proceeding.,
The weakness of the government is
due to the lack of a strong political
party, and the unwillingness' of In-
dians to assume responsibility.
Powers of the State are divided un-
der the system known as "dyarchy."
Resident powers, peace, order and
good government remain in the con-
trol of British authorities; transferred
power's, education, sanitation and pub-
lic works are given to native minis-
ters. The commissioners and minist-
ers who are at the head. of these de-
partments form the Council.
Practically, the system is unitary',
the government policy being determ-
ined by a majority in the Council.
This government is not at 1ll sat-
isfactory to the mass of the !people,
is Professor Van Tyne's opinion. The
young Englishmen who see in it a de'-
crease of political positions, and the
business interests, who favor strong
STUENTS RETURN FRO M
THREE-DAY NIAGARA TRIP
Practically three days crowded to
the limit in viewing the points on in-
terest in Niagara Falls and the Great
Gorge *as the experience the party of
59 Summer session students who made
the trip during the past week-end
accompanied' by Prof. I. D. Scott, of
the geology department. The party
left Ann Arbor, Friday afternoon for
Detroit, then went to Buffalo by boat.
They arrived at Niagara Saturday noon
and were lodged at the Temperance
house.
After lunch they made an automo-
bile trip to Niagra Glen on the Cana-
dian side, the location of a former
waterfall. According to geologists,
this waterfall has had practally the
same history as that of Niagara, hav-
ing an island dividing the brink of
what was formerly the brink of the
falls, occupying a position similar to
that of Goat Island of the present day
Niagara. It was necessary to make
the trip back to Queenstown on foot'
because of the strike on the Canadian
electric lines.
Some of the party took the aerial
car across the Whirlpool, while oth-

ers chose to travel the Gorge route
around the bend of the river. Aft:r
dinner the tourists visited Goat Islandj
and saw the Falls illuiniated by
night with powerful searchlights.
On Sunday the Cave of the Winds
was visited and the boat trip taken on
the Maid of the Mist. Sunday evening.
the party left for Ann Arbor, 'arriving
about noon Monday, Prof. D..H. Davis
escorted the party home.
Professor Scott was suddenly called
to Syracuse Sunday, due to the seri-
ous illness of his brother, James M.
Scott of that city. Professor. Scott is

Gives Development of Middle
Vagabond Poetry and
Romance

autocracy, oppose it. The National-
ists uphold it merely in order to force
concessions;. the non-Co-operatists
will have nothing'to do with it. The
ones who are optimistic and loyal to
the system.
That India is not ready for western
democracy, and is better off under
British rule, seems to be the opinion
of many princes. The Maharaja of Al-
war, whose guest Professor Van Tyne
was, said that India must develop her
own democracy, and that with Euro-
peani materialism and Indian spiritu-
alism, India must finally develop the
government peculiar to her need.
Just now, an independent state of.
official class, it seems, are the onlyj
400,000,000, only .ten percent of whom;
(Continued on Page Four)
HANFORD 0TALKS O N
OL-D LiTERATURE

ENTS TO INSPECT BUILDING
ISING AS MANY STUDENTS
tS ATTEND UNIVERSITY
vo-hour stay at the Cass Techni-
gh school and an hour spent in
g the Hotel Statler, constitute
nery for the seventh excursion
Summer session series, tomor-
Detroit has produced, in the
ly constructed Cass Technical
chool, an institution unsurpass-
completeness and capacity for
for technical education. The
houses approximately 10,000
.ts:
cheon will be served the Univer-
arty immediately after its ar-
n Detroit in the large top-floor
ria, reached by means of es-
.y roomy elevators. There will
allow a systematic trip through
stitution.. Beginning at the roof,
out-of door promenades are
ed, the group will be shown the
lly equipped class rooms, the
and work rooms, the auditor-
he offices, and the many other
es of this $5,000,000 educational
rise.
o'clock'the visitors will walk
ort distance to the Hotel Statl-
largest and most complete of
atler series in America, and the
in Detroit. Electrical equip-
wherever feasible, rooms for
furniture and decorations of
tion, and service of the best,

"Invites Operations Resumption
Washington, July 17.- Bituminous
coal minet operators were "invited"
by President Harding at the White
Hou'se today "to return to their mine
properties and resume operations" af-
ter they had replied to the President's
tendure of arbitration for settling the
national coal strike with a collective
offer. to put their properties and their
servides at the disposal of the gov-
ernment "in this crisis." Speaking as
chairman of the group of operators
after the White House conference, Al-
fred M. Ogle said the employers would
make the attempt to resume opera-
tions.
Meanwhile, the miners' unions,
through an adjournment sine die of
its controlling policy committee, made
certain its refusal to accept the arbit-
ration proposal and many of its of-
ficials immediately left Washington.
Military Protection Possible
There were intimations in official
circles that all the implications of
the decision to ask that the mines be
opened had been fully considered by
the government, and that there was a
possibility that the protection of
troops under the American flag, would
be furnished in districts were men
were willing to work, failing sufficient
local safeguards. Employers gener-
ally held that some coal production
would result in union fields in Penn-
sylvania and Ohio; If nowhere else.,
FUTURE BETSY BARBOUR DI-
RECTOR ENTERTAINED HERE
Miss Jeanette Perry, of Grand Rap-
ids, who is to be the social director of
Betsy Barbour 'House next year, has
been in tnn Arbor for the past two
days. While here Miss Perry was en-
-tertained at the dormitory by Miss
Eleanor Sheldon, the retiring social
director, and. Miss Lilah G. Hainer.
Christenson Leaves for Douglas Lake
Mr. J. C. Christenson, assistant sec-
retary and purchasing agent in the
University, and Mrs. Christenson have
left for Douglas Lake where they will{
visit the Davis Enginerinz campnda

Ages

ARCHBISHOP OF,COLOGNE
GREATEST OF OLD POETS
Speaking on the "The Beginnings of
Vagabond Literature," Prof. J. H:
Hanford, of the English department,
outlined the development of this type
of literature in the middle ages before
a large audience in Natural. Science
auditorium yesterday.
"The Gohiards are, so far as I know,1
the beginners of a gay tradition which
has survived to modern times," said
the speaker. "The term vagabond lit-
erature, means, I suppose, any liter-
ature by or about vagabonds. The
vagabondage itself may be of the body
or of the mind, the spirit, and the will.
Most commonly it is both."
Professor Hanford declared that "it
is most commonly the tavern rather
than the broad highway which is the
the scene of this literature, the part
played by mere vagrancy being a very
in'cidental one." The figures, he said,
which represent this spirit are Fran-
cois Villon, the Bohemian of genuis
who burned the candle at bothI ends
in 15th century Paris, Rabelais
and his hero 6argantua, and finally
Shakespeare's Falstaff. It is the com-
bination of humor, realism, frank sen-
suality, and conscious defiance of the
respectabilities or even the decenies
of life present more or less in all these
worthies which is the object'of my in-
quiry."
The speaker went on to say that
there were strains of this vagabond
literature in ancient times, to be
in the works of Horace, Ovid and
many others. Professor Hanford
quoted several poems which had their
source, as he said, "in the world old
cry of youth and freedom, protesting
against the long face of the ascetic, ex-
ulting in life and companionship and
the tabooed pleasures of the flesh."
The next poet in vagabond literature
to be mentioned was Primas, a name
given to the anonymous writer of cer-!
tain Latin verse publish'ed by the
German Grimm. Hugo of Orleans was
considered also by the speaker. Both
of these poets lived in the fisrt half
of the 12th century at the beginning
of the goliardic tradition as we know
it; Professor Hanford believes that
the poet was probably an itinerant
rhetoric teacher and beggar.
The greatest of these vagabond
poets of the Middle Ages, belieyes Pro-
fessor Hanford, was the Archbishop
of Cologne.
NO ACTION EXPECTED SOON
ON UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

RAILSTRIKE-P
COP NFEIREN GE
WI THOUT R
ROAD1 EXEtCTVES .A
JJEADERS WORKTN
SETTLAIENT I
SHOPMEN ANNOt
FIVE DEMANE
Indications Point to
Acceptance of Ter
Delegates
(By Assciated Th
Chicago, July 17--Pe
tions, halted over the we
resumed by members pf
States railroad labor bo
an effort to bring about
ement of the railway
strike.
W. H. Firley, president
cago and Northwestern
Bird, president of the
Alton, were among the r
who visited the labor b
the day fo r conferences
Hooper, c airman, while
McMenimen, a'labor bo
met several high -operal
tives.
Consider Strikers' D
While none of those p
make any statement re
subjects discussed, it a
some basis for agree ut
demands presented by B
leader of the shopmen to
at a conf'rence between
week, was sought as pr
the calling of a new form
of al1 parties befpre the
The five demands of t
were announced as the r
all senority rights' to
mediate establishment 'uf
adjustment board so thatt'
obtain quicker action qn
ances than is possible
labor board. the abolishr
side contracting by the r
toraion of certain rules
agreements and a return
of wages in effect before
dered by the labor boar
became effective, simuta
The strike.
An indication of the' r
negotiations in these issu
In the statement of R.
general chairman, of th
shop craft of the Northwe
the refusal of the easte
reinstate striking workei
seniority rights was prev
tlement as far as the r
Northwest, were oncerne
Early Peace in'S
Hopes for an egrly peai
based on the attitude. of
bold, president of the Ma
Way employes, who arrv
go tonight for conferences
hers of the laor board
port to prevent carriers :
ing maintenance men to
work.
While maintenance me
ported from various sect
country, most New York
,oined the strike, Mr. (
serted that such walkou
tirely unauthorized and t
order would be issed, a
after a meeting of the gr
is organization In Det
day, He will report thei
of the negotiations with
the labor board.,r

Some additions to the
strikers, in various sectic
so reported among the el
handlers, firemen and oil(
way executives declared
tion h Ld more than been
the number of shopmen
ed to work.

given under the direction of a hotel,
official.
The afternoon of sightseeing will
be over shortly after 4 o'clock, Those
desiring to take this trip should leave
their names room 8, University hall,
by 6 o'clock tonight. Special atten-
tion is called to' the time of leaving,

"No action has, been taken as far . Meanwhile strike disturba
as I know," said Dr. Christopher Gmslued to spread, the fomrces o
Parnall, professor of administrative ma ls andcinte te
medicine and director of the Univer- of the mails and mterstate
sity hospital, when questioned about was Icreased and more fe<
the recent agitation in Lansing to Junctions against picketin
make funds available for the comple- granted.
tion of the shell of the n' JInver
sity hospital. He fur ' i M ivd
nothing more could be c. ut . :u
a c t i o n w a s t a k e n . b y t ; ni vi s tre b ae r d'o r u n t i l't
tive boar or uitil thi e & a . '9 2.
lature met in. '19 . E'A Xht yt'§ e j~

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