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July 16, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-16

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ASSOCIATE
PRESS
DAY 4ND NIGHT
SERVICE

5I

No. 21

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JULY 1g, 1922

PRIcM FE

d

I RE1EGTS:
ROR MUSCLE
JL B FOD
EE TURNS DOWN PUR.
E OFFER BY VOTE
OF 9 TO 7
TO ACCEPT U. S.
.ATION PROPOSAL

Wednesday Excursion To Detroit
Includes Statler And Cass School

Cass Technical high school and the
Hotel Statler will be visited by Uni-
versity students on next Wednesday
afternoon. After luncheon, obtained
in the cafeteria of the school, which
has a capacity of 1,200, the party will
be conducted through the class rooms,
laboratories, the printing and other
technical shops, the 3,100 capacity au
ditorium, and to the seventh floor roor
promenades.
Trhe technical high school, includ-
ing the new building, cares for stu-
dents totaling in the neighborhood of
1,200. Three hundred and seventy-two
courses of instruction are given. These
include such work as shop forging,
mechanical, business training, elec-
trical training, nursing, and domes-'
HANFORD TO SPEAK ON
"VAGABOND LITERATURE5

oposal Will Again
d Through Report
f Minority

BeI

By Associated .Press)
igton, July 15. - Henry
er for purchase and lease of
rnment's projects at Muscle
.la., was rejected by the sen-'
ulture committee today by a
to 7:
voting for rejection were
Norris, Page (by proxy), Mc-
yes, Gooding, Norbeck, Har-
inley, all Republicans, and
Wyoming, Democrat.
L, introduced by , Chairman
lling for operation of the
by a government owned and
1 corporation also was re-
e vote being 9 to 5. Voting
tion were Senators Capper,
add, Smith, Ransdell, Ken-
rrison, Heflin and Caraway,
acceptance. were Norris, Mc-
oding, Norbeck and McKin-

tic science. It is considered a model
of its kind, and excels similar insti-
tutions in this country both in size
and completeness.
At 3 o'clock the group, will walk to
the -otel Statler where opportunity
to see behind the scenes of this 1,000
room institution will be furnished. The
Statler operates dining rooms with
capacity of about 3,000, kitchens equip-
ped with every modern convenience in
mechanicat machinery, a laundry, a
refrigeration plant, and a double sys-
tem of express passenger and freight
elevators. Typical rooms, the large
-auditorium, the lobby and mezzanine
floor, and the offices will be viewed
by the students also. The purpose,
aside from the large features of the
hotel, will be to convey an impression
of the aims and problems and admin-
istration of such an industry.
Special attention is called to the
time of leaving, 11 a. m., Wednesday,
July 19, at the Packard and State
streets station.
PRISON DELIVERY
I NDUBLIN FOILED
Free State Guards Battle With One
Thousand Political Pris-
oners
MICHAEL COLLINS LFAVES
TO ASSUME:FULL COMM\NIF0

KANSAS ROUNDS UP-
Jail 50 Alleged L WV. IV. Members;
State Officers Continue with
Clean-up
DEPUTIES SCOUR 'COUNTRY
IN SEARCH OF AGITATORS
(By Associated Press)
Topeka, Kan., July 15. - More than
50 alleged members of the I. W. W.
are now in Kansas jails as a result
of the drive against the organization
inaugurated by state and local au-
thorities when the present harvest
season began. These men are being
held in county jails at Hutchinson,
Pratt, Independence and other cen-
tral points of the great Kansas wheat
belt. Literature taken from many
this year indicates, according to of-
ficials, that the I. W. W. now is or-
ganizing under another name, "The
Red Feathers".
A force of half a dozen field depu-
ties under State Fire Marshal L. T.
Hussey is scouring the, country in1
search of I. W. W. organizers and
members. Reports from his men, the
fire marshal says, indicate that many
still are ' in the wheat country. ,
The fire marshal said that I. W. W.
workers are not moving in large
numbers as in previous years. Where
alleged groups of as high as 200 were
found movingacross the country in
previous years, he said, small bands'
of usually less than 10 are reported
this season. Freight trains carrying
large numbers of men going to and
from the harvest are being k work-
ed" by organizers of the I. W. W., re-
ports indicate.
SUNDAY SERIC U INI
A NN ARBOR CHURGNES

Artists To Give
Faculty Concert
The complimentary faculty concert
in Hill ,auditorium Wednesday eve-
ning will consist of vocal and organ
numbers by two well known music-
ians, Robert R, Dieterle, baritone, of
this city, ,and Winifred Dickinson, or-
ganist, also of this city.
Mr. Dieterle was for several years
a student at the School of Music and
later a member of its faculty. He
has been prominent in musical cir-
cles for many years both in the city
where he has held church positions
and in connection with student affairs.
He has also appeared in concert many
times both in Ann Arbor at the May
Festivals as well as in other parts of
the country.
-Miss Dickinson is a graduate of the
organ department, having received her
artist diploma last June. She has done
considerable public work, having ap-
peared in recital many times.
Both artists will offer several num-
bers.
ST UDE1N TS VISIT
DE0TROITINDUOSTRY
Shown Operation of Big Creamery
Plant and Manufacturing
Process
MANY POINTS OF INTEREST
INCLUDED IN FACTORY TOUR
Making the most satisfactory trip
from standpoint of informative excur-
sions, members of the fifth excursion
visited the Detroit Creamery com-
pany's main plant and the new city
of Detroit filtration plant, "the larg-
est in the world. Leaving Ann Ar-
bor at 8 ,o'clock, the students arrived

UNION CHIEFS
CN0 O ARD L STRIKE

,U;

offers, including those
na Power Co., Frederick
and Charles L. Parsons,
jected without a record
committee also voted
a record vote the bill
Senator Norris, at re-
er Representativq Lloyd
proposing a semi-govern-
ration.
adverse Votes, the pro-
anry Ford and Senator
e presented to the sen-
lecision through minori-.
was explained by Chair-
niday, July 16
I half hour, Presbytefian

"The Beginnings of Vagabond Liter-
ature" will be the subject of the lec-
ture to be given at 5 o'clock Monday
afternoon in Natural Science auditor-
ium by Prof. J. A. -Hanford,' of the
rhetoric department,
,Discussing his topic, Professor Han-
ford said that his lecture would be
concerned with the poetry of the
wandering students of the Middle Ages,
which consists largely of love songs,
drinking songs and songs of the open
road.
"The students traveled from univer-
sity to university, following their pro-
fessors," said Professor Hanford.
"Thus their -songs have an interna..
tional character. They are the prede--
cessors of Francois Villon, who is per-
haps best known among the lagter vag-
abond poets."
Readings from "Wine, Women and
Song," by John Addington Simonds,
who has translated these songs from
the original Latin will be given by
Professor Hanford, as well as his own
translations from a newly discovered
manuscript of Hugo of Orleans, who
is regarded as the originator of the
tradition.
BETSY BARBOUR TO
HOLD OPEN HOUSE

LEWIS, STRIKING MEN'S Hl
RECOlMENDS COMPLETE
REJECTION
HARD AND SOFT COA
FIELDS BOTH AFFEC'
Decision by Employers' Leader
Result of Lengthy Session
at Washington
(By Associated Press)
Washington, July 15.-Membe
the general policy committee o
miners' union, the body having
power to decide for all of the
workers now on strike in the bi
'nous fields and on %work suspe
in the anthracite fields, held a
hour session today during which
L. Lewis, president,of the organiz
recommended that President Hard
arbitration proposal for strike. s
ment be unqualifiedly rejected.
Washington, July 15. - The
members of the policy committi
the --dnited Mine Workers of A
ica, representing.local and dis
organizations throughout the coi
gathered here today to authorh
reply to President Harding's off
arbitration to settle the bitumi
and anthracite coal strikes. There
every indication that the reply v
be a refusal to accept.
Decide on Refusal
Determination to recommend a

Hian Ende'avor
an church.

meet-I

, July 17
nning of Vagabond
f. J. H. Hanford.
July 18
use" at Betsy Bar-
women invited.
Supply of Ancient
ted). Prof. W. C.
t Facts About Can-
a Peterson.
y, July 19
on No. seven-Cass
ool and Hotel Stat-
p ends at 5 p. m.
cent of the French
rated). Dean John

"Open House" for all women on the
campus will be held from 4 to 5:30
o'clock Tuesday afternoon by residents
of Betsy Barbour house.'
Dancing in the sun parlor and re-
freshments out on the porch will be
part of the entertainment that after-
noon. The dormitory will be open at
this time in order that the guests may
visit all parts of it.
This is the third party of- the kind
that has been ,given for the women
of the Summer session. They are
being held at each of the dormitories
open this summer.
BROUER, EXCHANGE
PROFESSOR, LEAVES

(By Associated Press)
Dublin, July 15.-An attempt to free
all the rebel political prisoners in
Mountjoy jail, including Rory O'Con-
nor, commander-in-chief of the irreg-
ular army, was frustrated early today
by the vigilance of guards. It is un-
derstood that there are more than
1,000 prisoners in the jail.
An official communique said the
prisoners made a concerted attack oil
the guards and it was necessary for
the latter to fire on the convicts to
save tleir own lives. Two prisoners
were wounded.
Hurl Bricks in Fight
The prIbners dug bricks out of the
walls and used them as weapons The
jail was badly damaged.-
An official military communique, is-
sued by Richard Mulcahy, minister of
defense in the Irish Provisional gov-
ernment, reported the position of the
regulars in County Limerick during an
all-day battle Friday, but were able
to turn the tide.
Tourists Flee Country
It is understood that the irregulars
are fleeing from Watertown. Limer-
ick has been isolated. Hundreds are
fleeing from the country, including
numerous American tourists.
Michael Collins, commander-in-chief
of the Free State army, has gone to
great headquarters to assume actual
command.
Eamonn de Valera, commander of
the irregulars, is reported to have fled
from Wicklow County. He is believed
to be in Cork.-
Heartt-Kolbe Marriage .Announced
Announcement is made of the mar-
riage yesterday of Marjorie Heartt,
ex-'21, and Frank .K. Kolbe, '14. The
ceremony was performed in the Con-
gregational church here.
Mrs. Kolbe is a member of Delta
Gamma sorority.
Kolbe is a member of Phi Alpha
Delta fraternity and was for two
years an instructor in the economics
department.,

in Detroit shortly after 9:30 o'clock fusal to the policy col

' the Uni-
(Hill au-

y, July 2Q
,cher College Move-
McKenny, president
ate Normal college,
July 21
am for the New Su-
Mr. M. W. Long-
ndent of Schools,t

Professor Brouer, of the University
of Delft, Holland, who has been a
member of the ;geology department
faculty during the past year, and who
more recently made a tour of the wes-
tern states left last night to return
to Holland.
He will visit the University of Tor-I
onto, and McGill university and sail
from a Canadian port.
Saraven New Golf Champion
Glenco, Ill., July 15.-Jean Saraven,
of Pittsburg, won the national open
golf championship today with a score
of 288.-
He is the youngest man who ever
held the open golf title, being only II
years of age and until three years ago
was a caddie.
Inauguration Speaker Honored
Dr. Samuel Paul Capen, member of
the United States bureau of education, 3
who was a speaker at the inaugura-9
tion of President Mariofn L. Burton in
the fall of 1920, has been elected than-I

Holy Communion will be celebrated
at the 7:35 o'clock service at 'St.'
Andrew's Episcopal church this morn-
ing. The morning prayer and sermon
will be by the Rev. George Backhurst.
"Salvation and the Present Day
Moral Struggle" will be the theme of
the address to be given this morning
at the Presbyterian church. Prof. W.
A. Frayer will speak on "Christian-
ity and International Relations" at the
meeting of the student noon class.
"The Call' to Service" will be' the'
topic of the discussion to be led by
Miss Elizabeth Stimpson at the Chris-
tian Endeavor meeting at 6:30 o'clock
tonight. This will be preceded by a
social half hour.
Rev. Sidney S. Robins will speak at
the Unitarian church this morning on
the question, "Was Jesus Just a
Teacher?"
Special music will again be a part
of the morning service at the First
Baptist church today. The quartette
will render the anthem, "Sing Alle-
lujah Forth" by Buck. Miss Wein-
man, of Ypsilanti, will sing "Night
and Morning" by Speaks. A bari-
tone solo, "God Shall Wipe Away All
Tears," will be given by Robert Diet-
erle, '23M. Rev. R. Edward Sayles
will deliver a sermon on the' subject,
"I WillBe As the Dew."
Rev. -C. A. Brauer will speak on
the "Christian Relations to the World"
at the 9:30 o'clock service this morn-
ing. Bible school will meet at 10:30
o'clock and the English service will
be held at 11:30 o'clock.,
KEENA APPOINTED
UNION SECRETARY
Kemp Keena, '19, assistant director
of the University Extension division,
has accepted the position of general
secretary of the Michigan Union' for
the year 1922-23, the appointment
taking place at the last- meeting of
the board of directors.
Keena has been active during his
college and graduate years in Union
affairs, having taken part in the pro-
duction of three Union operas. He
will assume his-duties in the fall. He
succeeds George.O. Brophy, Jr., '22L,

from which time on until noon they
spent inspecting the Detroit Cream-
ery station where they saw the pre-
paration of dairy products, the man-
ufacture of ice cream, the huge re-
frigerating machinery, the freezing of
artificial ice,) and the great garage.\
After lunching at the Statler, mem-
bers of the excursion, continued their
explorations when they had. reached
the city water works. Theodore A.
Leison, civil engineer for the city, de-
signer of the new filtration plant, and
engineer in charge of the work, gave
-a short talk on the general principles
of the installation. The party then
were taken thr~tigh 'the coagulation
beds, the settling basins, the large
pumping plants, and other equipment
much of which is now under construc-
tion.
Most of the heaviest work on the
plant has been finished, but it will
take about another year to finish the
complete structure. Over the rougl
concrete structure the network -of
(Continued on Page Four).
THRE H AA
CODE ;. ONE SERIOUS
Wayne K. Davidson, '22E, sustained
a broken collar bone and Carl Barton
a fractured shoulder and minor cuts
when the coupe owned and driven
Allan B. Sunderland, '22, collided with
another machine and then turned tur-
tle, about two miles from the city on
the Whitemore lake road Friday night.
Sunderland sustained minor cuts.
Davidson was reported last night,-
by hospital authorities to be recover-
ing satisfactorily, although suffering
from shock as well as the injuries he
had received. He was. removed to the
University hospital and Barton was
taken to St. Joseph's sanitarium.
Sunderland, it is reported, said
that the lights of the approaching car
blinded him so that he could not see
the road.
Destroyers Ordered to 'Canton
Honolulu, July 1.-Two Japanese
destroyers have been ordered to Can-
ton to protect Japanese lives and

derstood today to have been rea
by John J. Lewis, president of
union; William Green, secretary-t
urer, and Phillip Murray, vice-I
dent, as the result of a final co
ence. held by the three union ofil
late yesterday with President Hat
and Secretary Davis. Although the
thracite employers have accepted
President's offer virtually without
dition, the expected refusal of the
ion, it was said, will apply to the
thracite mines as well as the
minous. The union position is sa
be that a. resumption.of productih
the anthracite field would, by a
menting the coal supply,-fessen p
pressure for a settlement of the
uminous strike.
Indication of what further cc
thd government might take was
fined to a White House declarz
yesterday that President Harding
no doubt that he had power to c
ate the mines in an emergency.
this course the President might
the risk of impeachment, it was
cated, but he was said not to
such a possibility if the emerg
warranted.
Leaders Dissatisfied
The determination of national
ficers of the union to recommet
refusal of the arbitration offer is
derstood to have been reached
cause they are satisfied that the
ernment can not or will not I
operators now producing coal in
semi-unionized fields of West Virl
and Pennsylvania, ag well as
mines in Washington State and M2
County, West Virginia, to come u
the edict of the proposed Federal i
fixing body.

WELLS LEAVE TO TAKE PART
IN STATE GOLF TOURNEY
Carlton Wells, grad., leaves Thurs-
day for Flint where he enters the state
golf tournament to be held from July
19 to 22.
Wells is one of the Michigan men
who entered the tournament at Loch-
moor Country club last May and qual-
ified for the championship, first flight.
He has made the Ann Arbor course in

Yesterday's
American Lea
St. Louis 0, Washingt
Cleveland 2, Athletic
Chicago 3 - New Yoi
Detroit 2, Boston 0.

East."I

-w

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