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July 15, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-15

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C7, 4 P

P'ummrr

ED FAIR
DAY

Sf'F

~~3Ait

PR
DAY AND
SEI

w .. -

20

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 15, 1922

W

3 ,. r'

IRNNENT TO .
EPFIRM HD
JN RAIL.STRIKE
ET MEMBERS MEET WITH
RARDING TO DISCUSS
SITUATION
[NISTRATION VIEWS
' FULLY DISCLOSED
lity' of Necessity for Govein-
nt Control Said to Have
Been Brought Up
(By Associated Press)
iington, July 14. - While op-
as to the outcome of the
I strike was reflected at the
House today, there was other'
e that the administration in-
o keep a firm grasp on the sit-
and that every force at the
ad of the government will be
to insure maintenance of nec-
;nterstate tra~nsportatioin.
bers of the cabinet who met
resident Harding in the regu-
sion placed their main reli-
n the ability of Chairman
and thd United States.Rail
abor board to find a solution
problem.
Discuss U. S. Attitude
neeting was understood to have
wvoted largely to discussion of
1 and coal strikes and to the
tration attitude in the event
ain contingencies. The Presi-
as said to hold the view that
government operation of the
become necessary, it would
ridge the liberty of railroad
s to be drafted for service in
itions in which they have had
ace.
ever discussion occurred upon
e, however, was said to be on
ly hypothetical basis, there be-
evidence that federal control
be forced by developments of
ike.

EICH INTERPHETSI
SHAKESPEARE PLAY

"Taming of
With

the Shrew"
Sympathetic
sight

Presented
In-

CHARACTER CONTRASTS ARE
SHOWN WITH EFFECTIVENESS
(By W. Bernard Butler)
With true imaginative and sympath-
etic insight into the spirit of Shakes-
peare's "The Taming of the Shrew,"
and into the personalities of the char-
acters, Prof. Louis M. Eich, of the de-
partment of public speaking, last eve-
ning in Sarah Caswell Angell hall, held
the unflagging attention of his audi-
ence throughout his artistic interpre-
tation of the play.
Before beginning the reading of the
play, Professor Eich outlined the in-
crease of interest oral in interpreta-
tion and the change in the method and,
spirit of reading many of Shakespear's
plays. He said that Shylock on the
"Merchant of 'Venice" was formerly
a part taken by one of the inferior
(Continued on"' Page Four)
Volume Intended to Aid Youths In
Selection of Life Occupa-
tion.
FOUR"MICHIGAN PROFESSORS
CONTRIBUTE ON SPECIALTIES
Manuscript for a book of not less
than 150,000 words is now being
turned in to the associate editors' of
"Careers for College Men", a work on
which more than 100 college profes-
sors and business men are collabor-.
ating.
"The object of this great under-
taking," said Prof. Arthur H. Blanch-
ard of the highway engineering de-
partment, "is to compile in one book

MILTON DIXON, '22E,
SITY PITCHER, WHO
ED THE SYRACUSE

1922 VAR-
HAS JOIN-
INTERNA-

TIONALS.
SYRACUSE1DIMODNN
LAST YEAR'S VARSITY MEN TO BE
IN INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE
UNDER BARTELME
Milton A. Dixon, '22E, member of
the 1922 Varsty baseball nine, is the
latest of Michigan's graduate "M" men
to enter the ranks of professional

Cabinet Members Report
Ainet members brought to
(Continued on Page Four)

INERS' HEADNOT
FAVORING PARLEY
Lewis is' Preparing to Recommend
Refusal of Government Arbi-
tration Plan
RESPONSES RECEIVED BY
UNIONS "UNSATISFACTORY"
(Dy Associated Press)
Woshington, July 14.- It became
definitely known today that John L.
Lewis,,president of the United Mine
Workers, and other national officers
of the union, who have been negotiat-
ing with the government since Presi-
dent. Harding offered arbitration to
settle the coal strike, are preparing to
iecommend to their associates that t"ew
government plan be rejected.
Ever since the President's offer was
laid before the union leaders in Wash-
ington, they have made an effort to
get definite assurances from the gov-
ernment that the arbitration would be
applied to all the bituminous area the
union considers wtihin its scope, in-
cluding ports of West Viriginia and
Pennsylvania, where coal still is be-
ing mined.t
While no announcement has been
forthcoming officially, the union men
were definite today in asserting that
responses that they had received to-
day were unsatisfactory.
The bituminous operators likewise
have presented protests to the Presi-
dent's plan, based largely upon the
continuation of wage scales of 1920-
22 during the time arbitration is in
progress.
MIJ, ARTHROUTLINES
R.0.T.C.GOWTH HERE
MILITARY TRAINING NATIONATLY
\ ASSUMING MORE IMPORT.
ANCE, SAYS MAJOR
"Military training in colleges and
universities is growing in importance
throughout the country each year with
rapid strides," stated Major Arthur
commandaint of the Uniyersity R. O.
T. C. unit, yesterday,
'The Michigan unit has grown rap-
idly," he continued, "since its estab-
lishment here in the fall of 1919.
Starting at that time with an enroll-
ment of only 25, we have increased at
the rate of 100 per cent each year un-
til now we have more than 400 in the
department." Work is now offered in
four branches of training, he said,
coast artillery, signal corps, ordnance,
and infantry, infantry being the last
department added. He stated that oth-
er departments will be added as the
enrollment and demand warrants.
"We find that our growth is due
to a natural growing interest among
the upiversity men in military work.
The fact that enrollment in the R. O.
T. C. here is not compulsory as in
many state universities means that
our students enroll because of a de-
sire for a study of military work. The
advantage of this is brought out by
that fact that 65 per cent of men who
begin work here continue into the ad-
vanced work as compared with 20
per cent in the University of Illin-
ois where enrollment is compulsory
during the first two years of uni-

versity work."
Reports to date show that the Mich-
igan students attending summer train-
ing camps who have entered to qual-
ify for marksmanship rank second in
place among the colleges and univer-
sities of the country.
CORRECTION,
Due to a mistake in editing, a mis-
nomer was given to the building im-
mediately west of the Clements li-
brary, which, will torn down. It is
the old Engineering building and not
the Physics building which will be
razed.
Lutheran Young People Hold Outing
The young people of Bethlehem
Lutheran church held an outing at
Cedar Bend last evening. Following
a marshmallow and weenie roast, a
short business nteting Wa's ed_

SLAYER OF IIIXON
ABSOLVED BY JURY
Detroit, July 14-Patrolman Os-
car Storch, who shot and killed
Charles D. Hixon, Unfv-ershty f Michi-
gan student early July 5, was ab-
solved from blame by a coroner's
jury today." The jury held that Hix-
on "did not obey commands fron ai
officer who was in fear of his life
while investigating a holdup."
Storch declared he fired at Hixon
when the latter reached 'toward his
hip pocket, presumably to draw a
weapon. This statement was denied
by Earl Brotherton, a fellow student,
who accompanied Hixon at the time
of the shooting.
. .WITH LIQUIDAIR
H. H. Sheldon, Who Lectured Yester-
day, Will Leave for New York
College in the Fall
DEMXNSTRA TU PROPERITIES,
OF SUBSTANCES AT -180 DEG.
Aladdin with his lamp would have
been entirely outmiracled had he been
.present yesterday afternoon to view
the wonders which H. H. Sheldon of
the physics department produced from
his container of liquid air before an
audience in Natural Science auditor-
ium. Cherries, flowers and beef steak
when introduced into the liquid air
were frozen solid. Upon being thrown
upon the desk they cracked into bits.
The temperature of liquid air is
minus 180 degrees, two-thirds of the
way from freezing to absolute zero,
When it is exposed to the atmosphere
the heat of the air is so much greater
than that of the liquid air that the
latter boils.
Produces Snow in Bunsen Flame
Dr. Sheldon took a quantity of mer-
ctry which freezes at minus -40 de-
grees Centigrade and bysetting it, in
a receptacle of liquid air froze it so
hard that he was able to pound a
tack into the top of the desk with it.
A ball of iron upon being immersed
in the canister of liquid air and then
introduced into the flame of a Bun-
snow. "Frogs," says Dr. Sheldon, "can
safely be immersed in liquid air, as
they freeze every winter and in the
spring come to life again but it is
wise when performing this experi-
ment not to let the frog fall."
To show that oxygen is combustible
Dr. Sheldon poured a quantity of 'Ii-
quid air upon some cotton waste and
after the nitrogen had evaporated ig-
'nited the oxygen, which flamed up
.brightly. That very low temperature
decreases the resistance in a conduct-
or was shown when the filament of an
electric light glowed after the coil of
wire from the battery had been put
into the liquid air, showing that the
resistance had been decreased.
Leaves in Fall
.Dr. Sheldon was a member of the!
American division for gas defense
and for a year was investigating this
subject at the University of Chicago.
He expects to leave in, the fall to
take the position of head of the phys-
ics department of Washington Square,
college in New York City. This col-
lege is a division of the University of
New York.
AIR BOAT SERVICE
MAKES INITIAL TRIP

Detroit, July 14.-A party of prom-
inent Detroiters, headed bye Governor
Groesbeck of Michigan, were passeng-
ers on the initial trip today of one of
the flying boats placed in daily service
between this city and Cleveland. At
the Ohio city the guests of the Aero-
marine company, were to be banqueted
by the Chamber of Commerce, the din-
ner to celebrate the formal opening
of the air line. Governor Davis of
Ohio, and former Secretary of War
Baker, were to address the gathering.
The schedule of the flying boats
calls for a round trip each day by
a plane stationed at Detroit and a sim-
ilar trip by a Cleveland machine. The
machines are of the enclosed type,
luxuriously appointed, and seating 11

AlSASSlN
ATTEM PT
PRESI, N

ANNUAL FOURTEE
CELEBRATION
TED BY

FIRES AT POLICE C
CROWD MOBS ASS
Gustave Bouvet, Communis
After Fray, "Did Not
To Kill Anyone'
(By Associated Pre
Paris, July 14.-Three s
fired today at Perfect of Po:
by Gustave Bouvet, an ana
known to the police, in the
it was President Milleran
he was aiming. None of
took effect.
The shots were fired whi
ade was passing along t
Elysees at the corner of
Marigney. ' The assailant
behind a woman and' the fr
her dress.
The assailant was beat
crowd before the police s
BouveB said to .the police:
"It was at the carriage of
dent of the republic I inte
However, I did not wish t
one. I wised only to ma
onstration that' would att:
tion to the condition of th
lat."
,. Is Ex-Prsoner
Bouvet has been active i
istic and anarchistic circles,
erly was secretary of an
society and was sentenced
in prison for circulating
propaganda and instigating
The attack took place a
Millerand and the prefect
in the procession homewi
Longehamps, where a milit
was held this afternoon in
of Bastille Day.
M. Naudin was in the
that preceded the presiden
drawn carriage of state. H
mediately started in ptirsuit
who had begun to run, a
them caused Bouvet to fal
ing a bicycle overhead at
Attemnpt Lynching
The crowd immediately fe
assailant, a tall, square-
young man, 23 years old, a
to organize a lynching par
Meanwhile some spect
stopped the carriage of Pre
lerand, who had not heard
The president was urged
ceed, but he insisted on
quietly to the palace of the
few hundred yards away.'
M. Naudin, when congra
the president on his escap
"It is my baptism of fire.'
Last week he succeeed
deceased, as prefest of PaI
Bouvet carried two revo
loaded, and 25 cartridges.
Hundreds of Thousnds C
Soldiers of France from
sea and air forces passed
today when President Mille
crowds of hundreds of th
persons at Longchamps r
in the annual Fourteenth o
itary . pageant, the chief
BiasW sieDay.,
Three marshals of Fra
Joffre and Petain, Wcre
see the marshal's baton pr
the uead if the state to Gel
olle and Franchet sJpre'
Lyautey, who came from
the ceremony, was ill and
attend.

the l baseball. Togther with Ernie Vick,I

captain of last year's diamond team,
Dixon will do mound duty for the

?WS O/f TheDay
adon-' Home rule for Burma has
taken up in Conmons.
kio-The Yorozu says the govern-
is considering an offer to buy
alien Island from Russia.
idon-Admiral John Moresby is
at Portsmouth; born in 1830;
as an explorer; author of travel
in-The Chinese press is featur-
ppeals of women for recognition
right to participate in the form-
of a new government.
adon-A Calcutta dispatch to the
News says the Mount Everest
ing party (which did not reach
ammit), is on its way in; held up
>oded rivers in Thibet.
is-- Henry Morgenthau, former
d States ambassador to Turkey,
anging a $50,000,000 internation-
rporation to reorganize Austrian
try.
of the mail movement as yet
ected by the strike,balthough a
ier of trains have been dliscon-
d.
sages reaching the postoffice de-
tent during he day, however, in-
d the anxiety of railroad offi-
and in ,some cases of postal in-
>rs over the situation at certain
,enters, including Denison, Tex-
a, Marshall and Fort Worth,
, and Hattiesburg, Miss.
Leaders Maintain Secrecy
cago, July 14. - The conference
en Chairman Ben. W. Hooper,
e United States Railroad Labor
, and B. M. Jewell, directing the
ng shopmen, ended shortly be-
7 o'clock. Mr. Hooper and Mr.
1 both refused to comment on
eeting, which also was attended
imothy Healy, president of the

Syracuse team of the internationai
Sinformation relative to every career

league.
Vick was sent to the Internationals
by the St. Louis Nationals, with whom
he had signed immediately after leav.-
ing the University. He played in sev-
eral games for that outfit. Wagner,
former Purdue outfielder, ws also
farmed out to the Syracuse team.
Dixon was one of Fish9r's mainstays
on the mound last spring. He stood
out as the beet of the Michigan pitch-
ing staff, and was rated as one of the
best hurlers 'in' Big Ten baseball cir-
cles. His work at the bat was also
above par, keeping pace in his stick
work with the other Conference pitch-
ers. .
Philip G. Bartelme, former athletic
director for the University, is owner
and manager of the Syracuse team,,
which he purchased this year.
For Spotlig h t
College humor with plenty of local
color is promised to make the Spot-
light to be given July 2 in Hill au-
ditorium one of the best ever put on
by the Michigan Union during any
Summer session.
The acts already decided upon are
being practiced and others are being
worked out. The cast comprises some
of the best talent on the campus.
Many of the actors are students here
only for the summer and this is their
first opportunity for co-operation in
University activities.
One of the acts on the bill is about
a reporter whose joys and troubles
begin when he gets the assignment to
interview a Follies queen. And then
there's-but that would be letting out
the secret.
Jack Briscoe, '24E, general chair-

open to college graduates. It will be
available in all high school and uni-
versity libraries. The need of suc-
a book has long been apparent. Stu-
dents come to college with no idea, or
at the most, a hazy idea of what ca-
reer they are fitted for. Each chap-
ter of this book will contain a) cer-
tain career, written by an expert in
that line. in it will Wdiscussed the
preparation desirable for such a ca-
reer, the opportunity for adviance-
ment, financial returns, the qualiflca-
tions necessary, the extent of' the
field, and advantages and disadvan-
tages. The high school senior and
the college freshman will be able to
judge for. himself what career he is
best suited for."
More than 100 professions and busi-
ness occupations will be treated. Each
man is expected to write approxi-
mately 2,000 words on his subject.
Professor Blanchard said that he
thought that at least 95 per cent of
the contributors were college pro-
fessors.
Prof. Ralph L. Power of the Uni-
versity of Southern California is edi-
tor-in-chief. Five tchapters are con-
tributed by Michigan faculty mem-
hers:
The Paleontologist, by Dr. E. C.
Case, professor of paleontology; The
City Manager, by Dr. Robert T.
Crane, professor of political science;
The Structural Engineer, by Lewis
M. Gram, professor of structural en-
gineering; The Marine Engineer and
Naval Architect, by Edward M.
Bragg, professor of marine engineer-
ing and naval architecture; and The
Highway Engineer, by Arthur I.
Blanchard, professor of highway en-
4ineering and transatO
Betsy .Barbour House Elects Officers
Officers of Betsy Barbour house
have been elected for the Summer
session as follows: president, Sadie
Cnossen, grad; vice president, Alice
Smith, '24; secretary, -Anita Youell,

';

CHORAL UNION RE
"BANNER OF B
Members of the Ch
now rehearsing "The
George" to be given c
concert is one of the s
tertainment program
session.
The Choral Union is

de
as

a of the '

phone 131, will
with trvuts or

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