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July 13, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-13

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T'S GOING ON

Thursday, July 13

Permanent
anic Ideal.

Significance
Dr. H. Slon-

m.-Gun and Blade club meets in
ading room of Union.
m.-Educational motion pictures.
Friday, July 14
p. m.-Excurison No. five--Niag-
a Falls and vicinity. Under the1
rection of Prof. I. D. Scott, via
chigan Central railroad to Detroit.
m.--Experimental Demonstration
the Properties of Liquid Air.
p. m.-Lutheran students' outing
the river. Meet at 420 West Lib-
ty street. Everybody welcome..I
m.-Recital--Shakespeare's "Tam-,
g of the Shrew." Assist. Prof.
3uis iM. Eich. (Sarah Caswell
igell hall).
Saturday, July 15
m.-Excursion No. six--Detroit
eamery company and Detroit wat-
works.
Monday, July 17
m.-The Beginning of Vagabond
terature. Prof. J. H. Hanford.
,
Tuesday, July 18
mn. - Water Supply of Ancient,
ies. (Illustrated). Pro. W. C.
>ad.,
m.-Important Facts About Can-
r. Prof. Ruben Peterson.
Wednesday, July 1$*
..m.-Excursion No. seven-Cass
filcal high school and Hotel Stat-
Detroit. Trip ends at 5 p. m.
m.-Development of the French
*eater. (Illustrated). Dean John
Effinger.
m.-Concert-Faculty of the Uni-
rsity School of Music. (Hill au-
orium.)
Thursday, July 20
m.--The Teacher College Move-
mt. Charles McKenny, president
Michigan, State Normal college,
ilianti.
Friday, July 21
m.-"A Program for the New Su-
rintendent" Mr. M. 'W. Long-
1n, Superintendent of Schools,
skegon.
m.--"Problems of the Near East.
lustrated). Prof. F. W. Kelsey.
Saturday, July,22
m.-Excursion No. eight-Detroit
ws building, and Michigan State
lephone company, Detroit. Arrive
10 a. m. Lunch there, followed by
:rip through the telephone com-
ay's plants.

perean Reading. (Sarah Caswell
Angell hall).
Tuesday, Jul y 25
5 p. m.-"Rock Gardens." (Illustrat-
ed). Prof. A. Tealdi.
8 p. m.-"Noah Webster as Epidemiol-
ogist." Prof. A. S. Warthin.
Wednesday, July 26
1 p. m.-Excursion No. nine-Cadillac
Motor company, Detroit. Leave at
1 p. m.; arrive at 2:35. Trip ends
about 4:30-5 p. m..
5 p. Wz.-"Bridge Construction. (Il-
lustrated). Prof. L. M. Gram.
(l p: m.-Concert-Faculty of the Uni-
versity School of Music. (Hill audi-
torium.)
Thursday, July 27
5 p. m.--"Out 'Future Health Pro-
gram. Prof. John Sundwall.
p. m.-Educational motion pictures.
8:00 p m.-Michigan Union Spotlight
in HIl auditorium.
Friday, July 28'
5 p. in.-"Building of Personnel in Ed-
ucation" and
8 p. m.-"Publiclty inEducation." Mr.
R. G. Jones, Superintendent of
Schools, Cleveland.
Saturday, July 29
6 a. 'n.-Excursion No. ten-Put-in-
Bay, Lake Erie. Under the direc-
tion of Prof. I. D. Scott, via Michigan
Central railway to Detroit and
steamer to Put-in-Bay. Return to
Ann arbor about, 11 p. m.
EIGHT CHILDREN KILLED
1S1 'DEA' SHELL BURSTS
SOUVENIR THOUGHT hARMLESS;
EXPLODES IN WATER-
TOWN, N. J.
Watertown, N. J., July 12.-Eight
children, ranging in age from 11 to
16 years, were blown to pieces late
today by the explosion of a 75 milli-
meter shell on the back porch of a
house in Dimmick street, occupied by
Edward G. Workman and William L.
S4lisbury."
The shell, which was owned by
Mr. Workman, was one he had kept
ak *V souvenir and used on the rear
porch to hold the door from closing,
It was believed to be "dead".i
The children were playing croq et
in the back yard. The shell is e-
lieved to have either been set off by
the hot sun or have been struck by
one of the victims with a croquet mal-
let. Windows within a radius of two
blocks of the explosion ' were shat-
tered.
White Swan Laundry for quality
and service. Phone 165,-Adv.
Daily Wants Ads bring results.-Adv.
-Adv.
Don't forget to pay your Daily sub-
scription.-Adv. ,

Russian Conference Callaoses in Con-
fusion as Litvinoff Evades
Questions
FAIL TO REACH DECISION-
AFTER TWO HOUR DEBATE
'By Associated Press
The Hague, July 12.-The morning
session of the Russians ionference,
which was devoted to the consideration
of the private propertyr question, brke'
up amid considerable confusion, many
of the delegates declaring the' Russ-
ian replies meant that the collapse
of the Hague conference was inevit-
able.
No decision as to this, however, had
been taken up to 3 p. m.
M. Litvinoff, for Russia, declared
that the Allied experts had insisted on
beginning work just where'the. Genoa
conference began and had made pro-
gress impossible by threshing over old
straw and demanding replies from the
Russians which they could not possi-
bly make until the Powers told them
what would be done financially by them
to help Russian restoration.
"We can not say how long it will
take to restore Russia until we know
.what our resources will be," M, Lit-
vinoff insisted.
A virtual ultimatum had been hand-
ed to the Russians, in the form of a
list of questions on property which
had been communicated to M. Litvin-
off in advance, in a. secret conference
with Sir Philip Lloyd-Graeme, Great
Britain, and M. De Cattier, Belgium.
As the session broke up, M. Litvin-
off "declared that the peace pact would
hold for one month after the last meet-
ing.
A meeting of the commission on
debts was arranged for later in the
day.
Sir Philip Lloyd-Graeme, president
of the commission on property, which:
was tlife body sitting today, announced
at 1 p. m. that further discussion seem-
ed useless. That brought the confer-
ence to a sudden close after two hours
debate in whch Sir Philip and others
'of the non-Russian delegates persist-
ently tried to get Maxim Litvinoff and
his associates of the Russian delega-
tiop toanswer their questions on
property.
These related to the provisions for
the restoration of foreign property
conflsicated by the Soviet regime and
the probable time that would be re-
quired to rebuild Russia.
Just as at the Genoa conference, the
chief bone of contention was the for-
eign property that had been nation-
alized in Russia, and it did not appear
that the Russians and non-Russians
were any nearer an agteement at the
Fague than at Genoa on that problem,
whibh wrecked the Genoa conference.
ENROLLMENT WILL
EQUAL 1921 TOTAL

(By 3'hIlllp Wagner)
Camp Davis, July 9.-Much
work in azimuth was held up
the past week on account of.

of the
during
rain.

Ca mp Davis
Notes

future contests. The Camp is sat
isfied that the nine stood up as wel
if not better than coula be hoped for
ia holding one of the strongest teams
in, northern 'Michigan to so lowe
score.'
Severa of the musically incl ned
have organized'a dance orchestra, and
are -playing at the weekly dance at
Bryant's resort, near here.I
PETRO ONILY19201 GRID
MAN ONINIGLELIST

This week's issue of the "Black
Fly" held several articles of inter-
est. Perhaps the most absorbing of
the many features was - a description
of on1e of the occasional sailings of
the White Star liner "Pearl," a ship
owned and operated by private inter-
ests in the camp. Sports comments,
pokes, and cartoons completed the is-
sue.
Defeated by Pellston of the North-
ern league, 7-3 in a hard fought game
yesterday' afteruoon,} the Camp Davisi
lasr'ball team, and its loyal support
ers nevertheless are far from down-
hearted, a are already looking for-
ward to the game with .Bay View
scheduled for next Sgaturday.
The' game was characterized by a
brand of ball equal to, if not sur-'
passing, that of any previous Camp
nines. Errors were few, and the
players played with a unity of thought

teams last f
is a ca' ab
captain. A.
.those who k
he is a rems
and Neisch
fall and wiI
position if n
Kreis, who
I year.
With the
formerly co
c(ach, Micli
of experts t

er culle
(Continued'from Page One) er coae
called on to do the punting and al-
though none of them are at ,present a shortn of
long kickers they still get fair dis- inf
Ser will;
tance. Goebel did the place kicking

eges.

last year and will be called on to do
its again. Roby, Uteritz, K'node, and
Banks are all able to pass accurate-
ly and G(oebel or Kirk can be called
back from their positions at end if
necessary,
Goebel will lead the team from the
end position where he starred last
year. His height and long reach en.
abled him to make tackles when the
opposin'g int rf1erence\ thought they
had him out of the play. For the

w enlan

the task.
Books-Bargain
at Wahr's Unive
Adv.
Pay your Daily
$arn.e50.-A dv.
Patronize Daily

BARGAIN
COUNTER

BOOKS

Educational a:
Ot-

Fif ty -Cents

Each

Of' special interest to Summer School Teachers
and Students. New titles added daily;
9 UNIVERSITY
.-ICS BOOKSTO

1,

Sabe 10 per cent by Pur-
chasing a& meal tieet

I

It's surprising how easy it is to
be e&onomica1 when you eat at
the Arcade Cafeteria. Tempting
summer dishes make it a pleasure
too. Why not get into the iabit?

:

dray, July 24
Ian Experiences." Prof.
d, University of Roch-

The Arcade C
upstairs in Nick

-Recital-The class in Shakes,'

Daily wants AUS oring results.-Adv.

03 SO. DIVISION

Home Board

for THREE MEALS

$5.50 for TWO MEALS

ave your seveno'clocks and come to Breakfast afterwards.

mkfast 7:30 to 8i30

Lunch 12 to 1

Dinner 5:30 to 6:30
Mrs F. Dailey

I "t
- - - - - - - - - -

I

IE
E'Y

Have your noon lunch
at ,the Grey Shop."
Hot specials every noon.
Salads, Sandwiches and

Enrollment in the Summer session
will approximate last year's figure of
2,794 students, according to a state-
ment made yesterday by Dean Edward
H. Kraus. A final total 'cannot be
given at present, however, due to ad-
ditions made by late registrations, and
future enrollments in certain courses
in the Medical school, the second en-
gineering camp, and the second -term
in the Law school.,
Figures andstatistics from other
universities are being received and
compiled, in the office of the Dean of
the Summer session, which will show
the comparative gains and losses
throughout the country.,
R. C. HUSSEY AND IV. II. BUETNER
DOI.W IRESEAILCIH WORK IN INEB.
Letters received from R.'C. Hus-
sey, instructor in geology, and W. H.
Buetner, preparatuer in paleontology,
who left July 3 fqr Agate, Neb., whe're
they expect to do research work in
geology, indicate that a large number
of the foremost western universities
have sent representatives to these
fields. Prominent paleontologists from
metropolitan museums have also come
to Agate, in addition to the university
men present, and will assist in the
search for fossils. No report of pro-
gress made has yet been received.

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