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July 12, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-12

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Amw
(D 4 r

'ummrr

LY THUNDElf
ERS TODAY

C

xt l

ASSOCIATI
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

i

-.i

No. 17

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN; WEDNESDAY, JULY 12, 1922

PRICE F

i OPERATIONS AS
-,DEAN CABOT
N EMPHASIZES NEED FOR
'ONSIDERATION OF NECES-
SITY AND RISK
TLkINES FIFTY YEARS'
R~OGRESS IN SURGERY
ses Care in Choosing of Surgeon
as an Essential, Generally
Overlooked

Students On Detroit Excursion' Trip
Will See Huge Industrial Plants

we used the same process
in choosing our surgeons as

of
we

in choosing our chauffeurs, we
uld be all right," is the opinion of
Hugh' Cabot, dean of theN Medi-
school, as expressed in his lec-
e on "Safety in Surgical Opera-
as" last night in Natural Sciencel
litorium. There is no such thing
a surgical operation which is free
in danger, but if the patient has
d judgment in choosing ,his sur-
in, 'his risk is minimized.
>eople do not approach surgical
rations as they do other things.
is is, at least in part, the fault of
medical profession, for 50 years
the same operations that are per-
med easily and successfully today
re surrounded with mystery. Every-'
ng that cannot 4eal with facts is
rounded with mystery. However
re is no earthly reason why we
uld not treat surgical operations
we do problems in economics.
Can Gauge Risk
It is possib'le to say what the risk
any given operation on any given
ient a 'any given time. will be,"
d Dr. Cabot.' Seldom, however,
s- the patient ask for this infor-
tion. He would probably consider
risk involved in investing a thou-
d dollars in an enterprise for
rs before taking the final step,
he apparently give_ little thought
he danger. incurred to his own life
a surgical operation.
'he element of the risk involved
s not enter in, operation, of ne-
sity, but in thos of election it
uld be carefully considered. All
trary indication's, concealed con-
ons which forbid the operation or
se the risk should be taken well
o consideration. In a normal,
lthy individual .the mortality rate
very low in cases of the appendix
ng removed between attacks, not
re than one in a thousand.
Look Up Surgeon's Standing
t is a source of constant surprise
r little the average man bothers
look -up the standing of the sur-
n, continued the speaker. In any
g store in'any town or city of the
ter"n hemisplhere it is possible tc-
ure a list of all surgeons in that
n with their ratings, so it is pc
e to have confidence in a man's
lity even it one is a stranger
re.
'he important things to remember
first that one must have an ac-
ate diagnosis, and second any
.cealed reason for letting the pa-
t alone must be known ,an r
ye all, choose your surgeon as you
ose your chauffeur, someone
ady and reliable.

Seeing a plant whose capacity is
222,000 quarts of ice cream and 45,000
frost-bites per day, and which in milk
and butter produces ,the major por-
tion of Detroit's supply, will be among
the experiences of those students tak-
ing the fifth excursion into Detroit on
Sr4urday, July 15.
Te Detroit Creamery company prac-
tically controls the ice cream busi-
ness in that city and does a great por-
tion'of the diary _business. In al' it
has five distributing stations, several
dairy farms, and a large stable in De-
troit. -Bottling of milk, making of but-
ter, manufacture of ice creain and
NUWNTED SOUTH
CIN~~A REONIE
Interview Wth Recently Deceased
Minister to United States is
Made Public
,wEr ARE ALMST POWERLESS
UNTIL WE ARE RECOGNIZED"
(Note-The following interview with
Wu-Ting"fang was given a few days
before his death, which was recently
announced by cable)
Can'ton, South China, June 4.-(By
an Associated Press staff correspond-
ent, by mail).-The former Chinese
Minister at Washington, Wu-Ting-fang,
received today the correspondent of
the.Associated Press and set forth the
reasons why he believed the powers
should recognize South China. He pre-
sented the cause of the.Chinese repub-
lic in'this regard during a long in-
terview in which he explained also
the vital differences between Sun Yat
Sen and Chen Chiung-ming, and dwelt
upon China's financial difficulties.
Dr. Wu, who is now the civil govern-
or of Kwangtung province under the
Southern government, received the
correspondent in his Canton office. He
answered every question asked him
with great care, and was interested
in seeing that'his answer was correct-
ly transcribed.
Practically Independent-
"For gearly five yeas South China
has been practically independent, and
,for about two years we have been
existing as the Republic of China," Dr.
Wu said. "During all this time we
have been 'running our ,government
without assistance from the outside
world, and the outside world is not
going to help us until we gain some
form of recognition.
"How are we going to build up a
modern government without being
able to contract loans and without be-
gin able to make treaties; In other
words, without recognition by the oth-
er governments in the world? We are
so handicapped 'that we are almost
powerless, and if we continue to sit
and wait, we will be waiting until
doomsday. We must force the powers
to recognize us. As soon as they do
this civil war will stop, and the peo-
ple of Kwangtung and South China
will set up a model government.
Functioning Perfectly
"At present we are in reality a de-
facto government," Dr. Wu continued.
"For months this government has been
functioning perfectly. During all this
time we have been dealing with oth-
er governments, although unofficially.
I am addressed as Governor by the
foreign officials of other govern'ments
-in this part of China. We are con-
stantly dealing, unofficially, with con-
sular and other officials of foreign
countries as though we were a perm-
anent government. After the over-

(Continued on Page Four)
Yesterday's _Games
American League
Chicago 2, Washington 3.
St. Louis 1, New York 2.
Cleveland 2, Boston 0.
Detroit 2-8, Athletics 4-9.
National League
Boston 10, Pittsburg 4.

frost-bites (with samples furnished),
and the special processes used i the
pasteurization, certifying, and modify-
ing of milk, will be shown in some de-
tail.
A trip to the stables, where the com-
pany makes its own harness and wagon
equipment, will conclude the morning's
program.
Largest Filter Plant
After lunch at the Statler hotel
cafeteria, the Detroit Water Works,
out Jefferson avenue, will be inspect-
ed under the personal guidance of
r. Leisen, sivil engineer for the ciIy.
While any visit to the Detroit water
system at its source would prove in-
teresting, this particular one should
prove especially so because the huge
new filtration plant, by far the largest
in the world, is under construction.
The plant, consisting of pumping
stations, coagulation basins, filter beds,
and filtered water resevoir, cvers
three acres. The filter proper contains
80 beds, and in the examination of
these the complete process of purifying
water will be clearly explained. The
capacity of the syste mwill be from
320 to 350 milion gallons, more than
enough to supply any peak load yet
required for he city.
iNames Should Be In Friday
Pressure pumps, both 'old and mod-
ern style, several stories in height,
are housed in two special buildings,
and will be included in the tour of
the works. The trip should be com-
pleted by 3:30 o'clock, in time to reach
Ann Arbor before 6 o'clock.
Persons planning to take the trip
should leave names in room 8, 'Uni-
versity hall, before 6 o'clock Friday
night, July 14. Special service on the
D. U. R. will meet teh party at 8
o'clock Saturday morning at the State
and Packard streets station.
STRIKEfFIL'TO STOP
GOOPRAIVDINING
KANSAS COAL FIELD CONTINUES
6,00Q TONS DAILY DESPITE
GENERAL WALKOUT
(By Associated Press).
Pittsbur, Kans., July 11.-Co-op-
erative coal mining in the Kansas coal
field is responsible for a large part
of the more than 6,000 tons daily be-
ing produced in the field.
In spite of the strike, the Kansas
field has been producing coal in con-
siderable quiantities from the first.
Most of it has been shipped on rail-
roads. Some of it has been trucked
out to Joplin and other points where
there has been a market for fuel.
Workers Real Operators
There are two classes of co-opera-
tive miners. The first comprises men
who operate small or "dinky" mines
and are in fact the real operatprs of
the mines. The second comprises
the men who are working at large
mines under company supervision.
The first class is not new in the
Kansas field. The plan is simple. A
small group o mners-ometimes
half a dozen and sometimes fifteen or
twenty-organizes and leases a small
mine. The owner of the property is
to receive a royalty of 25 to 50 cents
a ton for the coal. The men operate
the nine theiselves and divide the
profits.

INCLUDE MORALITY,
SAYS SLONIMSKY
CR"EDS AND ETHICS NOT MERGED
BUT INTERMINGLED, STATES
CINCINNATI LECTURER
PROPHETS' PRIME IN-
TEREST WAS MORALITY
Attempts to Trace Development of Re-
ligion From "Poetic
Fancy"
The prohpets teach a twofold doc-
trine, said Dr. H. Slonimsk, ofCin-
cinnati, yesterday in the Natural Sci-
ence auditorium on "The Ethics of the
Prophetic Religion." "It is a doc-
trine of religion whose main content
is social and international morality,
a religion which draws its life from
the thought of a regeneratd mankind."
Dr. Slonimsky first asked tie funda-
mental question: "Ethics, religion:
Are the two things different?" The
philosop'hers, he said, had tended to
separate them, but the common -man
feels that religion calls for morality.
We are apt to asume that religion and
morality have always been in integri-
ty, but his is not the case. The ideas
of associating the two were new
thoughts, discoveries. The men who
discovered these thoughts, he said,
were the prophets.
Prophets Discovered the One God
"What are the prophets?" he asked.
Replying: "They are tre discoverers
of the One God. They discovered that
Jehovah is not the'God of Israel but
the God of justice, and the father of all
men. Monotheism is their first and
fundamental achievement-the single
God of all mankind."
Expanding on this idea, Dr. Slon-
imsky, sal: "By virtue of that idea
they are the creators of religion. And
by the same token they are the creat-
ors of morality--of a great-guaged
orality which first gives meaning to
the life of men and peoples in history."
"It is a tiotrcine of morality so far-
flung and far-reaching that is can not
do without a God, that it necessarily
involves a God of goodness, whom we
must postulate and without whom we
can not get on."
.In tracing the development of re-
ligion Dr. Slonimsky showed that re-
ligion was first "a poetic fancy at work
on first causes,"-mythology. Then
there developed, he said, a system of
beliefs, "and presently a creed, a faith
in which, is the essential part of the
religion, the prime means of salva-
tion."
Monotheism Insures Unity
In. conclusion he summarized by
saying, "The many gods go because
they represent the particularism and
the wars of the many tribes. The One
God, is enthroned to insure the real-
ization of the one mankind."
GROESBECK O;K.'S
PRISON.ADDITION
Lansing, July 11.-(Jpon the rec-
ommendation '6f Governor Groesbeck
the state administrative board today
authorized that plans for the construc-
.tion of additions to the cell block at
Marquette prison, to cost approximate-

ly $250,000, be Drepared.
Th board's action followed a state-
ment by the governor in which he de-
clared that the prison situation in
Michigan is growing so serious that it
can no longer be dodged.
"All the stae's penal institutions,"
he said, "are over-crowded. It seems*
to be the policy of the Detroit house
of correction to refuse to take any
state prisoners. Inasmuch as the De-
troit house of correction is unfit for
habitation, even by criminals, the
state prisoners there must soon be
transferred to other state institutions,
further aggrevating the situation."
The addition at Marquette contem-
plate:d by the board will mean the re-
moval of one wall of the prison to
make room for an addition to con-

Alumnae Members
Entertain Women
Members of the Alumnae house en-
tertained the women of the Summer
session yesterday afternoon at the
first of a series of-teas to be given
by the Women's league during July
and August. Guests were given the
opportunity to go through the dorm-
itory, and the history and origin of
the house were explained. Punch and
wafers were served during the after-
noon.
The next tea will be given next:
Tuesday afternoon by the girls of
Betsy Barbour 'house.
STUDENTS.TO11VISIT'
Gorge, Maid of the Mist, Goat. Island
Excursions Are on.
Schedule
TRIP TO BE UNDER SUPERVI-
SION OF PROF. I. D. SCOTT
Summer session students will be
able to make a trip to Niagara Falls
Friday, July 14, with a geologist who
has visited tlk region riore than 10
times within recent years. Prof. I,
r
D. Scott of the geology department,
W'ho will personally conduct the ex-
cursion, has made a minute study of
the geological history of the Falls
and the Great Gorge. The, party will
leave Anx Arbor at 2:30 o'clock Fri-I
day afternoon. The'Gorge trip will be
taken Saturday afternoon. Sunday the
party will explore Goat Island and
'the Cave of the Winds and take in
Vhe "Maid of the Mist" trip.
All those who intend to take the
trip must see Professor Scott. or Mr.
Davis mornings in room 432-435 Nat-
ural Science building or from 1:30 '
3:30 o'clock in the afternoon at i'oom
432.
SH U LTRPUBLIC HEALTH PROGRAM ,

LA&O, EXECUTIVI
LEADERS HURR
TO 1ONFEREN
STATE TROOPS GUARD SI
TRAINMEN VOTE NOT TO
ACEPT PROTECTION
SIGNAL MEN WILL NC
STRIKE, PENDINGPAR!
Crafts Heds Assume Hopeful.
tude; Conciliatory Expressloi
Look Toward Settlement
(By' Associated Press)
Chicago, July 11. - With
troops and United States deputy
shals on guard in half a cozen s
to prevent interference with
movement of the mails or with I
state commerce, leaders of the
Four" railroad brotherhods and
way executives'were hurry ng to
cago tonight to confer tor orro
issues growing. out of the shopi
strike.'
i At Bloomington, Ill., where
troops have been guarding the C
go and Alton railway shops,
neers, firemen. and train condu
members of the four big bra
hoods, voted today not to entei
shops or yards as long as troopi
stationed there.
Refuse Protection ,
The day passed quietly at the s
Only two shets were fired during
day, and both were traced to a;
dental discharge of sentinels' rifl
Thematter of working with gi
and state troops on duty is or
the matters to which the "Big F
chiefs have objected.
Another issue to be discussed
sbe the alleged insistence of the
riers that members of the "Big> I
do workk regulaly assigned to
crafts now on strike. The U
States railroad labor board last
rends'red an opinidon that the i
bers of "one craft of workmen
not. required to do the work o
other uiion, raose members. wei
strike unless' they-did sovolunt
Meahbers of the "Big Four" u
also have protested that rolling
has not 4e}n kept in condition
the stilk o f shopmnen, engil
claiming that engines with defe
brakes, headlights and air equip
have been turned over to them.
Signal len to Stay In
A rift in the strike clouds aD
ed today with the announceme
B. W. Helt, 'president of the br
hood' of railroad signal *ae, th
14,000members would not stril
this time but expected┬░ to open
negotiations with the individual
riers -gajrding their' grievances
t'hey are unable to reach an a
ment, the entire matter will be i
red 40 the railroad labor boari
said.
The shop crafts leaders assfln
more,hopeful attitude today wit]
receipt of advices that, all tol
'railroads have made conciliator:
pressions looking towards a s
ment of the strike andthat ton
ready were conferring with the
erion committees.
No settlement wl be made
ever, except' on a national basU
union heads insisted, adhering
(Continuedon Page Four)

A.A.R.R. CURTAILS
TOURIST SERVI
O
Owing to he ' coal shorage,
tourist train service will be cu
ed on the Ann Arbor railroad,
nounced H. S. Bradley,' traffic v
'ger for the road. On and after
nesday, July 12, the following
service will be in operation, and
,so continue until furither n(
i Northbound train No. 55 will
Friday and Saturday nights. S
bound traiN No. 56 will ru4 S
and Monday nights.
Prospective travelers who
booked accommodations on

DEPARTMENT DIRECTOR
STRESSON RELATION
INDIVIDUAL

LAYS
TO

Prof. John Sundwall, who speaks
July 27 on the subject of "Our Future
Health Program," is director of the
recently organized' Hygiene and Pub-
lic Health Division of the University.
Dr. Sundwall is a new faculty mem-
ber, having come to Michigan last fall'
from the University of Minnesota,
where'he was engaged in the same line
of work.
"Prior to the World war," says Dr,
Sundwall, "our chief public health ac-
tivities were confined to the control of
environment. The sanitarian was the i
most active person in the health de-'
partment. We are beginning to appre-
ciate more and more that it is the per-
son, more than things, who is to be
feared in disease transmission. In the
future 95 per cent of health activities
will be concerned directly, with peo-
po-ple."
The relation :of the dlivision of hy-
giene and public health to the -ro-
motion of health and prevention of dis-
ease will be the subject, of Professor
Sundwall's lecture.
.USS CROPS BADLY,
DAMAGED BY PESTS
Moscow, June. 16.-Field mice and
locusts have damaged million's of
'acres of grain in several: Russian
districts already seriously affected by
last Year's drought .and .famine, and
which were expected this year to pro-
duce good crops.
A report.of the bureau of agricul-
ture, states that more than 20,000,000
acres are in the belt affected by these
pests. Locusts have swept in from'
Persia, and the field mice have not
been far behind.
Chemical warfare squads mobilized
to fight the plague have been greatly
'-., ., , '.a . . -L....._~

CONCEPT TONIGHT
isie Artists to Appear on
Program
ad of a series of compli-
ncerts given this summer,
the -University's enter-
ogram will be given at 8
ght- in Hill auditorium.
L1 be. two groups of piano
y Mrs. Qeorge B. Rhead,'
ups of vocal numbers by
ieeler, tenor. Both artists
faculty of the School of

In the other class+
mining the operations

of co-operative
are on a larger

scale. Officials of the miners' union
assert the plan is simply a ruse. to
permit miners to work and still not
break with the union. "Soviet" is the
term applied by one of the district4
officials,
Men Split Proceeds
Under this plan of co-operation the
men organize to work a mine. The
work is to be done under the super-
vision of a company foreman. The
mend are paid so much a ton for the
coal they dig, loaded on the cars. At
the Sheridan mines, it is said, the
men receive $2.50 a ton. The men
pay half of the salary of the foreman
and the company pays the other half.
The company pays the men for the
coal that is loaded and the men di-
vide the proceeds.
This plan is in use at Sheridan

u the

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