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July 09, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-09

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ASSOCIATES
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT T
SER VICE

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JULY 9, 1922

PRICE FIVE

BI IZE TROOPS FOR STRIKE DUT

.,

ET ON.
UCTiONl

DETROIT SUBURBS
ASK ENFORCEMENT

STUDENTS VISIT
DETOBUILDINGS

II

MEETING
DUE TO
TAND

BY

USS MAKE
PESSIMISTIC
Reported Exert-
Pressure on

Detroit, July 8.-Governor Groes-
beck will be aked to send an invest-
igator from the attorney-general's de-
partment "to the down river viilages
near here to inquire into the law en-
forcement situaton."
This was decided at a meeting 'of
the incoln Park Betterment league
last night, members of the organiza-
tion freely making charges concerning'
alleged laxity of administration, in the
points in question, and asserting ef-
forts to obtain relief locally had been
unavailing.
The meeting, It was said, was the
outgrowth. of the recent murder ot
Patrolman Ignatius Witkowsky whip
he was patrolling his beat in Ford
City, and the shooting early yesterday
of Albert M. Jaeger, chief of police.
Witkowsky, it is said, had incurred the
enmity of bootleggers by his activ-
ties. He was shot from ambush. Jaeg-
er was shot by one of five men he had!
lined up in a Lincoln Park saloon aft-1
er chasing "them as holdup suspects.
WESBROOK BEATEN
BYBL* T.LDN

.i
t
e
T
O
l
F]
l
T

1, 0

MAKE EXTENSIVE INSPECTION
OF NEW MUNICIPAL LIVRARY
Making the most extensive trip of
those yet taken, a party of 25 Summer
session students yesterday visited the
plant of the Burroughs Adding Ma-
chine company, the great General Mo-
tors office building, and the new pub-
lic library, Detroit.'

Through Burroughs Adding Illa.
chine, General Motors Build-
Ings

Associated Press)
ae, July 8-The interna-
rence on reconstruction of
on the point of a break-
The delegations were
over the' outlook. In
refusal of the Russian So-
es to refuse to make pri-
y concessions predictions
hat the meeting would end
[et delegates (evidently
by news of good harvests
e more stubborn in their
n they were at Genoa.
sistently demanding cred-
ensation for damage done
property through Allied
rvention in Russia.
i delegates, especially the
Belgianus, declare that the
e making demands that
fulfilled and it is under-
e French hive threatened
immediately if the Russ-
modify their stand. The
eonid Krassin has had no
effect on the Russian
s indicated that, in addi-
of good harvests at home,
extremists are exerting
ore nressure on the Mus-

World's Champion Annexes Straight
Sets From Wolverine; Play-
ing Done Under Cover
FLNAL 1tOU\D IN NATIONAL
MEET TO BE PLAYED TODAY
(By Associated Press)
Indianapolis, Ind., July 8.-Zensu
Shimidzu, Japanese Davis cup play-
er,, and Charles Garland, Jr., of Pitts-
burg will meet in the semi-final round
today of the senior singles- in the
anuual national clay court tennis
championships. The winner will
meet William T. Tilden, II, Philadel-
phia, world champion, in the final
round Sunday. Tilden eliminated
Walter Wesbrook of Detroit, former
Western Conference collegiate cham-
pion, in straight sets yesterday, the
game being played on a covered
court when rain made outdoor play
impossible.
Several senior doubles matches
left over from Friday will be played
today and it is expected the semi-
finals will be reached.
SUNDAY SERVICS IN
ANN ARBOR CHUR6HES

.n.

IuuIj

LN TO COME

Leaving at 8 o'clock, the special car
enabled the tourists to arrive at the
Burroughs company a little after 10
o'clock. The Burroughs Adding Ma-.
chine company employes approximate-
ly 5,000 men in a factory making
more than 150 machines a day. The
idea of inventing an adding machine
occurred to Mr. Burroughs when he
was, working in a bank where he
had become a slave to the addition of
figures. He developed his idea and
finally organized a company which
first began to manufacture the ma-
chines inSt. Louis. At that time Bur-
roughs thought that his concern would
have to go out of business when they
had supplied all of the 8,000 banks
which were then in existence in the
United States.
Machines Save Labor
He did not realize that Commercial
houses of all kinds would be able to
use his devices when they had been
adapted to their uses. The growth of
the Burroughs business has surpassed
even the originators' fondest dreams,
for there are in operation today more
than 500,000 of their maclines. Two
of the greatest points of interest about
the factory are the automatic screw
machines and'the high degree of clean-
liness which is maintained through-
out the plant. These screw machines
manufacture thousands of the micro-
copic parts employed and by their
rapid movement an'd fine precision are
able to save the work of hundreds of
men.
As a fitting conclusion to the Bur-
roughs trip, the staff photographer
took a picture of the visiting group.
These were distributed among the
uests in pocket memorandum Looks.
Leaving the Burroughs plant, the
tourists had lunch on Woodward ave-
nue in a dining room reserved es-
pecially for them, after which they
went, to the General Motors company
office' building. Whei they had mount-
ed to the 13th story of the structure
1, an elevator and climbed three more.
floors by foot, the members of thea
ti were able to see Detroit from an
unequalled point of vantage.
See Big Building Workings 1
The guide then explained the work-
irg of the latest dev-elopment in ele-
vators and appliances, after which heI
led the visitors through typical floors
of the office wings. Then came the
lower floors and the basement where
are located the large fan for circulat-,
img air through the inside offices and
the air washer which eliminates most
of the dust and injurious gases from
the air and maintains a humidity best
adapted for breathing. The building
also has a large filtration plant and
ultra-violet ray device for pu ify-
ing the drinking water which is cool-
ed by a carbon dioxide refrigeration
mar hine. #
Dining rooms for men and women,
gymnasiums, two- swimming pools, the'
gig antic power house, the great ex-!
position hall, the experimental lab-,
oratories, and the large auditoriuml
with seating capacity of approximate-
ly 1,500, were tig other principalE
points of ,interest noted about the
building. When the building is com-
pleted it is expected that the General
Motors c9npany will occupy a rela- i
tive large percentage of the office
space of the building whose total costI
is more than $20,000,000.
Library #o Hold 800,000 Books

1itzpatrick is considered
trainer and track coach
-y," said Coach Yostspeak-
rinceton university trainer
ing to Michigan, July 17,
ill lecture on athletic
.d track training in ,the
poaching for the balance

FORD WILL EXPAND
CANADIAN FACTORY
Detroit, July 8.-Reports that the
Ford Motor company of Canada. con-
templated industrial expansion were
confirmed today in the official an-
nouncement that the company had
purchased a tract.,of several hundred
acres of land hr Walkerville -adjoin-
ing its present holdings. The new land
will permit the plant to double its
capacity.
The land acquired has 2,000 feet
frontage on Detroit river. The pur-
chase price was $1,000,000.
Plans for additional buildings to the
Canadian plant are being drawn, it
was said at the concern's offices.
All the engineering activities of the
Henry Ford enterprises in the Detroit -
district are to be housed under one
roof in Dearborn, it was officially an-
nounced today. A one-story laboratory
building 800 by 200 feet, will be the
first unit erected to replace the 13
temporary structures now in the Dear-
born group and built hastily during
the war.
SCHOOLS MUS T NO9T
-HENRY W. HOLMES.
Ideals Do Not Demand-Education Opei
To All Regardless of Ability,
Says Harvard Dean /
HOLMES ADDRESSES NATION-
AL EDUCATION CONVENTION

UNPAID SUBSCRIPTIONS
All unpaid subscriptions must
be paid before July 15 or the $2
rate will be charged.
Mail checks for $1.50 or call
in person at the Press building
between the hours of 8 A' M. and
5 P. M.
Sr
Librarv courses ,
Shows -1g Gain
Classes in the courses given 'li-
brary methods during .the Summer
session register more students at the
University of Michigan than at any
other schol in the country, according
to Librarian W. W. Bishop. The
classes this summer show an increase
of 50 percent over last year's enroll-
ment.
The courses take up every phase of
library- work from the histories of
libraries down to their furnishings.
Miss Clara. E. Howard, of Pittsburg
high school, is giving a course on the
high school library, its place and
problems.
She is also taking up the subject
from the point of view of the public
library and its place in the commun-
ity. Miss Harriet'Peck, of the Albany
library ,School is instructing a course
in classification and cataloguing which,
(has an enrollment of 60 students.
The total enrollment in all courses
numbers 86.
The University library is particular-
ly well equipped to give a course of
this sort having a total of 475,000
volumes with unusually fine biblio-
graphic facilities. According to Li-
brarian Bishop, no other library in the
country has such excellent equip-
ment.
Gun-And- Gladers
Dan ce In Gym

ONE KILLED 'IN CLINTON, ILL,; CLASH;
ILLINOIS SUMMONS FEDERA~L SUARDl
jNATIONAL COURT RVN l ~

go, Fitzpatrickc was
capacity of train-
. He worked with
10 years, during
xned out champion-
aany of Michigan's
tes. In 1910, after
accepted a position'
e he has been ever
)UTPLA YS
6 -2, 6-0

Special music will be a part of the
morning services today at the First
Baptist church. Robert Dieterle, '22M,
will sing "The Publican," by Van de
Water and the quartet will render
"Land of Hope and Glory," by Elgar.
Rev. R. Edward Sayles will preach
on "The Limitation of" Law." Follow-
ing the morning service the Students'
guild will neet at the Guilti house.
Rev. Howard R. Chapman will direct
the study in the Gospel of Mark.
Services this morning at the - Uni-
tarian church will be conducted by
Vr. George D. Wilner. "The Emphas-
is in Religion Today" will be, the topic
on which three laymen of the parish
will deliver ten-minutes addresses.
The laymen are Prof. John F. Shep-
ard, -Mr. M. E. Osborn and Mr. C. C.
Freeman.
Holy Communion will be celebrated
at the 7:35 o'clock services at St.
Andrews' Episcopal church this morn-
ing. Morning prayer and-sermon will
be at 10:30 o'clock by Rev. George
Backhurst, of All Saints' church of
Brooklyn, Mich.
The theme of the -morning sermon
by Rev. Leonard A. Barrett, of the
Presbyterian church will be "The
Problem of Waste." This will be the
first of a series of sermons on "As-
pects of the Present Day Struggle."
At the student class which meets at i
'11:4 o'clock, Dr. -G. Carl Huber will i

(By Associated Press)
Boston, July 8-The tests by which
higher education in the United States
can meet the' legitimate demands of
democracy were outlined tonight by
Dr Henry W Holmes, dean of the
Harvard University graduate school
of education in addressing the conven-
tion of the-National Education associ-
ation
The colleges, he asserted, will meet
these demands, first if many types of
education can be provided; second,
if the econonfic bar can be lowered;
and third, if selection can be made
without discrimination in favor of
those of any particular type of mind..
Loyalty to Ideals Needed
"Democracy," said the speaker, "re-
quires of education nfore than a mere
defense against the evils of illiteracy.
It "demands the development of posi-
tive loyaltyuto common ideals that are
understood and freely adhered to.
Does this mean that the common re-
sources must be used to give every
man and woman a college education?
"Mental and ,educational tests show
that there are limits beyond which it
is unprofitable to educate many thous-
ands of boys and girls in the schools
as they are now constituted. On the
other hand, higher education may be
given with great profits to many who
do not now receive it. There is an
economic selection at work which the
colleges, even those maintained by the
state, cannot wholly overcome; but
at least they ought to counteract it.
This is a problem in the administra-
tion of, public funds and private bene-
factions for the education of those who
lack the means to support themselves
through college, but have the ability
to meet the intellectual standards in
to receive greater numbers.
Standards Should Be High.
"The last thing the colleges ought
to do is to lower intellectual stand-
ards in order to receive greater num-
bers. They ought to seek rather to
equalize opportunity on the economic
side while they hold standards high."
It is a mistaken policy, Dr. Holmes.
asserted, which insists that education
of collegiate grade shall be open only
to "those of bookish mind."
"There is probably a basic factor of
general intelligence," he . continued,
"without which no course of colleg-
iate grade can be successfully unAer-
, taken, but it is doubtful if our psy-
c holical hmi rxyamintnsfi really. n-

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IN
TIGATES REPORTED INTER
FERENCE WITH MAILS
UNION LEADER DELAY
SIGNALMEN'S WALKO
Strike Order, Held Pending Board
tion Would Affect Fourteen
Thousand
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, July 8.-The calling ou
troops in Illinois, the assemblin
soldiers in half a dozen other st;
and the intervention of the fed
courts in the nation wide strike
of railway shopmen marked the c
of the eighth day of the walkout
night.
' Restrain Picketing'
The Chicago, Burlington and Qi
cy railroad tonight secured a fed
injunction here restraining picke
of the Aurora shops while earlie
the day a-n injunction was issuec
New Orleans restraining strikers f:
interfering with trains on the Soi
ern Pacific, and at Council Bluffs,
the Burlington obtained a tempor
restraining order directed aga
striking shop men.
Department of justice officials
Washington were investigating
reports that strikers were interfe
with the mails.
Troops Ordered to Clinton
Lieut. Gov. Sterling, of Illinois,
night ordered troops to Clinton w
an outbreak was threatened foll
ing a clash between Illinois fed
guards and strike sympathizers,
which a by was killed, and two n
one a striker, were injured.
One bright ray appeared through
threatening strike cloud tonight w
B. W., Helt, president of the Br<
erhood of Railroad Signal Men,
gounced he would withhold strike
ders to 14,000 signal men, pending
preparation of a program of con
eration of strike conditions by
railway labor board.
Missouri Troops Awai Call
Jefferson City, Mo., July 8.-'
Missouri National guard, numbe
4,021 men and officers, will be in
ilized tomorrow morning, it was
nounced tonight following a con:
ence between Governor Hyde , Ad;
ant-general Rautt, and representati
of five railroad companies operat
throughout the state. They will
held for instant service.
Springfield, Ill., July 8.-Regimes
headquarters company of the 13
infantry now at Decatur, has been
dered to proceed immediately to C
ton in response to rumors of seri
trouble in the shop men's strike th
Adjutant-general Black announced.
Barbourville, Ky., JulyS8.-Gover
Morrow late today ordered troops
mrv'e from Hopkinsville andLiverm
to Madisonville when county auti
ities there advised him the situal
at a strip mine proved threaten
and that local authorities would
unable tto handle thes situation
trouble developed, as they anticipa
Fifty men are due to arrive in 1
isonville early tomorrow. The ca
ry troops from Hopkinsville wIll
equipped with machine guns while
infantry from Livermore will c
its regular field equipment.
HARDING REACHES WHITE
HOUSE AFTER OHIO T:

Barbour gymnasium assumed an
pect of ga iety last night during the
dance given by the Gun and Blade
club. The hall was decorated with
American flags.
The chaperons for the evening
were Dr. Fred B. Wahr, and Mrs.
Wahr, Dr. James F. Breakey and
Mrs. Breakey and Mr. and Mrs. Jo-
seph E. Bryce. Kennedy's dance or-
chestra furnished the music for the
occasion. Punch was served during
the course of the evening. ,
MAY NAME MINE
JURY WEDNESDAY
Marion, Ill.,, July 8.-The special
grand jury to investigate the Herrin
mine massacre, in which more than a
score of non-union workers were slain
by striking union miners, probably will
be organized next Wednesday, Circuit
Judge Hartwell announced today.
YOST LEAVES FOR CHICAGO
ATHLETIC DIRECTORS' MEET
Coach Fielding H. Yost left Ann Ar-
bor last night for Chicago, where he
will attend a meeting which will se-
lect a commissioner "to co-operate in
the enforcement of amateur rules."
He is one of three commissioners ap-
pointed for this task by the directors
^f int^ron"^ppaf'^ ^t ^"-f - of -a ---n

Press)
July 8.-Mlle.
France, today
her title as
hampion by de-
rstedt Mallory,
the final round
ass court ten-
score was 6-2,

ae after
3 by the

" AI Thela

to be v!

the

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