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July 06, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-06

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THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED; PROBABLY
RAIN TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XIII. No. 12 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JULY 6, 1922 PRICE FIVE CENTS

HO0PE-. FR S PEEDY
SETTLEMENT 0OF
STRIKE IN VIEW
ROAD LEADERS I)ECLARE MEN
WILLING TO CONSIDER
CONCILIATION
CHIEFS HINT AT PEACE
PROPOSAL FROM BOARD
Jewell Makes Public Total Vote Poll-
ed by Shop Crafts Work-

ers '

11 1

(By Associated Press)
Chicago, July 5. - Hope for the
speedy settlement of the country wide
strike of the railway shopmen was
seen tonight in a statement issued by
Ben W. Roper, chairman of the Un-
ited States railroad labor board' and
B. M. Jewell, leader of the shop
crafts, who ordered the walkout.
In a reply to a letter from Mr.
Hooper, which was regarded as con-
ciliatory, Mr. 1'ewell declared that
the strikers were willing to "consider
any negotiation with anyone in au-
thority for settlement of the strike."
Willing to Confer
"We are willing to confer with any-
body authorized by the railroads to
bring peace proposals to us," said Mr.
Jewell. "I include or exclude nobody,
but if the labor board, for instance,
came to us with a definite proposition,
we would not hestitate to consider it."
Mr. Jewell made public the exact
figures of the strike vote taken by
the 400,000 members of the six shop
crafts. The vote was divided into
tthree separate ballots, the first on
accepting a $50,000,000 reduction in
wages ordered by the labor board,
the second on restoration of working
rules altered by the board, and the
third, the abolishment of outside con-
tracting by the roads."
Heavy Vote Polled
The tabulations showed only 94.7
per cent of the men vqted to strike on
the question of wages, the heaviest
vote for a strike being on the question
of outside contract labor, which poll-
ed 97.1 per cent of the vote east.
The ballot on rules came second,
with 96.2 per cent for strike. Union
leaders said that the vote displayed
the relative importance attached to the
three points as issued by their mem-
bership.
HIXON 210, TO BE BURIED
IN EASTo MOTHER FOUND
(By Associated Press)
Detroit, July ,-Carles D. Hixon, Uni-
veirsity of Michigan student, who was
shot and killed by Patrolman Walter
Storch early yesterday, will be bur-
ied in Washington, according to noti-1
fication received from his mother,
Mrs. Hixon, who was on her way from
Boston to take care of the body.
Mrs. Hixon was found in Boston
by the police of that city today. She
was attending an educational conven-
tion, as secretary of the board of
education, for the District of Colum-
bia.
Hixon was shot when he reached to
his hip pocket for what Storch thought
was a pistol.
TILLEY DECLINES OFFER"
FROM W. VA. UNIVERSITY
Prof. Morris P. Tilley, of the Eng-
lish department, recently received an
offer from the University of Virginia,
his alma mater, to take charge of work
in English literature there, but has
declined the call and will remain on
the English faculty here.
Yeterday's Games
American League
Detroit 6, Cleveland 5 (11 innings).
National League
Chicago 11, Pittsburg 5.

MISS JEAN HAMILT N, OF NEW
York City, who becomes Dean of
Women in the University on Sept. 1,
is a graduate of Vassar college.
Since graduation she has been ac-
tive in the organization of girls'
clubs and is at present general sec-
retary of the National League 'of
Girls' clubs.'
FORD PLANT SEEN
BY175 STUDENTS
Interesting Points Shown to Mem.
hers of Summer Session
Party
INSPECT PRODUCTION SYSTEM
OF CITY'S LARGEST INDUSTRY
Yesterday afternoon saw more than
75 summer school students making a
tour through one of the largest indus-
tries in the world, the Highland Park
plant of the Ford Motor company. The
special car, under the direction of
Carlton Wells, the trip was brought
to a successful conclusion. Leaving
Ann Arbor shortly before 1 o'clock,
the party reached Highland Park
about 3:30 o'clock.
The huge Ford plant seemed like a
city in itself with its crowds of peo-
ple leaving the day shift and the oth-
ers coming in to take their places.
The various departments resembled
city wards with many interlacing
aisle-ways or streets throughout on
Which surged antincredible amount of
human, and metal traffic.
Guide Furnished
The guide explained the various in-
teresting points. He told the visit-
ors that one building, the first one
they entered, covered more than
700,000 square feet of floor space,
contained approximately 11,000 ma-
chines, costing $7,625,000. More than
50 miles of leather belting is used to
dirve the machines, apart from those
that have individual motors.
One of the most impressive things
about the plant was its cleanliness.
Clean windows admitted a maximum
of light, almost spotless floors were
everywhere. Productionsroutes were
arranged ih such a way that -the parts
seem to grow into the finished ma-
chine.
After a dinner downtown, the par-
ty left Detroit for Ann Arbor just be-
fore 7 o'clock, all heads crowded with
a mass of rapid but deep impressions
of a great industrial plant.
CHINESE STUDENTS HOLD
RECEPTION FOR GRADUATES
Approximately 70 students attended
the social held in Lane hall last w-eek
by the Chinese Student club. The
purpose of the gathering was to hold
a reception for new students and a
farewell to graduates who will return
to China shortly. The main part of the
social was a number of short talks giv-
en by the departing students in which
they told of the work they intended
to take up upon their return to China.

G MAN RTILLEY
NEVEREQUALLED
Development of Heavy Arms Is RecordI
In Military History Says E
Engineering ProfessorL
REPORT SHOWS "90 MILE" GUN '
NOT ENTIRELY SUCCESSFULs
"Full credit should be given Ger-
many for the remarkable developmente
of artillery as evidenced by the long
range gun perfected during the Worldt
war, an achievement never equalledI
before nor duplicated since," is the
opinion of Prof. H. W. Miller, of the
engineering college, as expressed in
his lecture on "The German Longt
Range Gun," in Natural Science audi-t
torium yesterday afternoon. Profes-f
sor Miller gave a brief account of the
evolution of artillery beginning witha
the crude pieces of the 13th century
-and culminating with a more detailed
account of the seventy mile gun used.
by the Germans to bombard Paris in{
the late war.
"A fundamental principle should be
recognized by all nations," said Pro-
fessor Miller. "After a war starts it
is too late to make large guns. Not1
over fifty were made after the World
war began, and seven of these were
the 120 kilometer guns of the Ger-
mans."
I Accuracy Variable
A description and explanation ofE
these were given in detail by theI
speaker. They took discarded fifteen
inch guns and converted (them by
many intricate devices of steel-craft
into the seventy mile gun that throwsT
a projectile carrying eighteen poundst
of explosives twenty-four miles into
the air, for a distance of ninety milesI
through the air in the space of three
minutes. A total of 303 shots was fired
by them, 183 of which fell within the
walls of the city of Paris, and 120 ofI
which failed utterly in reaching theirI
mark. At such a distance a deiation'
of 10 miles is not an uncommon occur-
rence, the stability of the projectile;
when it leaves the gun being respon-;
sible in some measure for the vari-
ance in amount of deviation.
PROF. YOUNG HEADS
SURVEY OF STATE
Prof. Leigh J. Young, associate pro-
fessor of forestry, is in CharlevoixI
county, heading a surveying party of'
18 men, who are making a geological
survey of the state. The work will
take several years to complete. In
the party there are geologists, soil
experts, agriculturists, and foresters.
They are figuring out the natural re-1
sources of the state and expect to
make maps showng what the soil is1
best fitted for and recommend to the'
farmers what will grow best on their
lands.
Prof. Carl Sauer, is also helping
with the work. The University is co-
operating with the state to the ex-
tent that they are paying the salary
of the professors and the state is pay-
ing their expenses.1
S. OF E. FACULTY TO GIVE
TEA HONORING NEW MEMBERS
Members of the faculty of the SchoolI
of Education will give a tea this aft-
ernoon from 4 to 5:30 o'clock on the
Martha Cook terrace in honor of the
new faculty and students enrolled in
educational courses in the summer
school. Wives of members of the fac-

ulty and students are also invited.
Dean Edward H. Kraus and Mrs.'
Kraus and Dean Allen S. Whitney and
Mrs. Whitney will be in the receiving
line.
Choral Union Starts Rehearsals
Members of the summer Choral
Union last Thursday evening for their
first rehearsal in preparation for the
choral concert which will be given
later in the summer, under the direc-
tion of George Oscar Bowen, of the
School of Music.
Members of the Choral Union of the
regular session and those who took
part in the high school performance
of "Creation," are requested by those
in charge, to report for rehearsals
at 7 o'clock, Tuesday and Thursday
evenings.

"Any community which fails'to tac-
kle its educational program in a
businesslike way, basing its actions
entirely upon facts instead of upon
personalities and favors will find that
it has fallen^ far short of living up to
its responsibility - the training and
education of its children," was the
statement made by Paul C. Packer,
professor of administration, Univer-
sity of Iowa, in an interview yester-
day. Professor Packer left last night
after spending the day in consulta-
tion with students in the School of
Education.
Portrays City's Character
Professor Packer believes that every
city has an educational responsibility
that extends from the kindergarten. to
the junior college and that in the near
future it will include the university.
"The character ofdthe city and an
analysis of its needs must be kept in
STUDENTS TO SEE FALLS
ON ANNUAL TRIP JULY 14

the foreground in proper school-
building planning."
"In general the number of build-
ings for each type of school should be
as few as possible." The policy of or-
ganization, Packer declares, is the es-
sential basis of any concrete plan-
ning. This matter should be left to
the educational staff.
"While the actual work of assem-
bling the building may be left in
charge of the business unit, with the
educational staff rests the responsi-
bility that every brick will contribute
to requirements educationally."
Decries Politics
Professor Packer believes that the
reason for the failure of many pro-
grams has been that the men who pre-
pared them relied on their political
strength and environment instead of
upon facts. Ultimate steps should
always follow a careful study of the
growth or lack of growth of each
school over a period of five years. To
prepare each year's program by dis-
tricts will tend to avoid errors and
permit an easy presentation to those
who must approve or disapprove.
"The city that neglects planning of
this kind in a careful scientific way
will be pilng up a seres of regrets for
the future, rather than leaving a her-
itage for the next generation which
will be of credit to the vision of those
who have been in charge."

EXCURSION HAS BEEN
EVERY YEAR SINCE
1906

Iowa Dean Decries Politics As
Influence In Educational Systems

IRISH INSU RGENTS
SU RRENDER AFTER
WEEK OF FIG HTING

IRREGULARS FORCED
UP BARRICADES
STRONGHOLD

TO GIVE
AND

MADE

Summer students will repeat the
annual Niagara Falls. excursion, which
has been given every year since the
summer of 1906, when they leave Ann
Arbor Friday afternoon, July 14, to ar-
rive in Niagara Falls Saturday morn-
ing, via Detroit and Buffalo.
The party will take the Gorge trip
in the afternoon and see the Falls
illuminated by night from Goat Is-
land. On Sunday morning Goat Is-
land and the Cave of the Winds will
be explored and in the afternoon the
boat trip on the "Maid of the Mi st"
will be taken. Leaving at 4 o'clock
Sunday afternoon, the 'excursionists
will arrive in Ann Arbor Monday
noon.
The trip will be under the super-
vision of Prof. I. D. Scott of the geo-
logy department, who during frequent
visits to the Falls has become familiar
with its main points of interest.
The total expense of the trip to each
person, according to Professor Scott,
will be $30.74, including $18.99 rail-
road and boat fare,i and $11.75 for
meals, room and the cost of excursions
during thie stay at the Falls.
Students wishing to arrange to take
the trip, may see Professor Scott or
Mr. Davis any morning in room 432-
435, Natural Science building, or from
1:30 to 3:30 o'clock any afternoon in
rooia 432.
WILL SHOW FRENCH
RELIEF PHOTOPLAY
"The Heritage of France" a four-reel
motion picture showing conditions in
Northern France before the war, ware
scenes, and ending with reconstruc-
tion, will be shown at Natural Science
auditorium tonight at 8 o'clock.
This picture is the personal proper-
ty of Miss Anne Morgan, of New York,
chairman of the executive committee
of the American committee for devast-
ated France. It is being shown in
Detroit in connection with the Na-
tional Good Will delegation cam-
paign. Dr. Bertha C. Hartwig, of
Detroit, is accompanying the picture
here.
SUMMER DAILY TRYOUTS
WANTED
Students attending the Sum-
mer session and who wish to try
out for positions on The Summer
Michigan Daily staff should re-
port between 1 and 5 o'clock
in the afternoon at the Press
building.
Tryouts for the business de-
partment should see Herold C.
Hunt, business manager; for the
editorialydepartment, James
r Young, city editor.

c 1
NEW ' MINNESOTA COOISAH
M -1-WESTERN SPORT
Fred W. Luehring newly appointed
director of athletics at Minnesota, isY
in hopes of organizing a mid-western,
rowing regatta to be held on the up-
per waters of the Mississippi in.the1
spring. Plans ar: being laid for the1
event and Wisconsin and Minnesotac
have agreed verbally to send crews.
Invitations will also be sent out ,to
other schools and colleges in this sec-
tion who have crews and it is hoped
that there will be other entries.
Minnesota has fine facilities for
rowing but has never taken it up
until the coming of Mr. Luerhing. He
has aroused much interest in the sport
and at present there are many stu-
dents practicing each day at the Min-
neapolis Boat club.t
For the last few years there has beenf
considerable agitation at Michigan in
favor of rowing, which could be stag-
ed on -1arton Lake, but the cost oft
shells, boat houses, and other equip-
ment necessary has been so high that
Coach Yost has deemed it inavisable.,
"Divie* Duffield, veteran coach of the
Detroit Boat club was considered as
a coach and he agreed to come, buta
the plans fell through.
Chicago, Iowa and perhaps one or
two other Big Ten universities have
water facilities and the added impetus
of the planned regatta may arouse in-
terest that has so far been slack in
the West.
PROF. HOBBS BACK '
FROM WORLD TOUR
Prof. William H. Hobbs, of the geo-
logy department, after making a year's
tour around the world on work of
scientific investigation, has returned
to Ann Arbor. Professor Hobbs in-
tends to spend the remainder of the
summer, working on correlatins and
writing up the results he observed.
SUMMER EDUCATIONAL CLUB
HOLDS INITIAL MEETING
Under the supervision of Miss Mar-
garet Cameron, secretary of the School
of Education the women's Educational
club, of the Summer session, held its
initial meeting yesterday afternoon
in the parlors of Betsy Barbour house.
The club will hold meetings approx-
imately every other Tuesday evening
during the Summer session.
This is primarily a social organiza-
tion and programs of an entertaining
nature are being planned by a come
mittee elected for this purpose.-

DE VALERA'S HIDING
PLACE KEPT SECRET
Victory for Regulars Coes After
Burning'of Buildings and Heavy
Losss of Life
(By Associated Press)
Dublin, July 5.-The siege of the
strongholds of the, insurgent Irish
forces was virtually ended tonight
with the surrender of all groups of
the men who had been fighting for
the past week behind the barracades
and the capture of one of the prin-
cipal leaders, Cathal Diucha, former
minister of, defense.
The success of the national cause
has been purchased at the cost of
razing buildings and terrible destrue
tion,'to say nothing of the loss of life
and the "many seriously wounded.
There is still no information as to
the whereabouts of Eamonn de Val-
era, who has apparently escaped.
In the late afternoon, when ten
buildings were aflame,, the remainder
of the irregulars, driven toward the
Granville hotel, were fired upon on
all sides, still maintained a desper-
ate resistance with automatics and
rifles. The regulars then adopted the
plan of bombing the insurgents out.
Kingstown, Ireland, July 5.-Armed
rebel bands, including Irish mountain
girls carrying revolvers and black-
Jacks, were mounded up and captured
In the hills of County Wicklow today
by Free State troops. The bands had
been invading villages in the valleys,
descending from the mountains in
swift night raids. Millinery shops were
especially singled out for looting by
the women bandits.
ILRGERADIENCE REETS
SECOND FAULTY CONCERT
A larger audience than usual at-
tended the second of the series of
faculty concerts given at Hill auditor-
ium Wednesday evening, July 5. Miss
Nora B. Wetmore, mezzo-contralto,
and Burton Garlinghouse, pianist,
were the soloists.
Mr. Garlinghouse commenced the
program with a group of three shorter
pieces from Chopin. He handled the
two posthumous waltzes, in E minor
and D flat major, with ease and delic-
acy. The-third of the group, a fan
tasie-impromptu, while more serious
in tone, was in keeping with the oth-
ers and was played with equal ability.
The Grieg sonata in E minor was his
second number. It is a distinctly more
ambitious piece than any of the first
group. Mr. Garlinghouse acquitted
himself most creditably in the third
section, a charmingminuet move-
ment, though he played the , longer,
more colorful molto allegro with dash
and distinction. He played encores
for both numbers.
Miss Wetmore sang the Voce di
Donna aria from La Gioconda for her
first number and a group of three
very brief songs -for the second. The
three final songs were Dedication
(Schumann), L'heure Exquise (Sch-
lesinger), and A Feast of Lanterns
seemed most suited to her voice.
Youngsters Attend Fresh Air Camp
Seventy-five happy youngsters from
Detroit, Flint and Ann Arbor began
their summer vacation Thursday when
the first section of the University of
Michigan Fresh Air camp open,
ed at Pickney. Mr. Wallick accompan-

led the boys to Ann Arbor on the in-
terurban and automobiles provided by
residents of the city took them to the
camp. There are to be four sections
of the camp in all, each lasting for
ten days and taking care of seventy-
five boys.

CARRIER WANTED

Student with bicycle to deliver
The Summer Daily. Apply today
at the ofice, Press building.

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