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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 02, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.E TWO THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY S

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OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER 1SESSION OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN'
Published every morning except Monday during the Summer
Session by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
publication of all news dispatches credited to it or otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoflice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $x.so.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed oo words, if signed, the signa-
ture not necessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
and notices of events will be published in The Summer Daily at the
discretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Summer Daily
office. Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No
manuscrirt will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse the senti-
ments expressed in the communicatonis.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 2414
"MANAGING EDITOR".............ILEO J. HERSHDORFER
City Editor..........................James B. Young
Night Editors--
Howard A. Donahue Julian E. Mack
Sporting Editor...................- ........Jack D. Briscoe
Women's Editor............................Doroty Bennetts
Editorials........... ....... .................Herbert S. Case
Humor Editor................................Donald Coney
Literary Editor................................-....G. D. Eaton
Assistants

W. B. Butler

Leona Horwitz

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ..................HFROLD C. HUNT
Advertising.,........................................Townsend H. Wolfe
Publication:.........................George W. Rockwood
Accounts...................................Laurence H. Favrot
Circulation............................-...FEdward F. Conlin

Assistants

l~rL -! - Ti.CO-

Philip H. Goldsmith E. Clark Gibson Katherine E. Wr
SUNDAY, JULY 2, 1922
Night Editor-W. BERNARD BUTLER
Assistant-R. C. Trotter

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BOOKS-AND VALUES
Not only the excellence of the instruction, but
also the opportunities it offers for working out
practical problems in its work-rooms, has caused
an increase in the enrollment in the course in li-
brary methods. The University Library is undenia-
bly one of the finest for its beautiful architecture,
as a home for books, because of the great collec-
tion of books, and its facilities for taking care of
these books. The value of a broad instruction in
library work is great because of the large part the
library plays in the present movement to educate
the..masses, and to inculcate a desire for reading
good literature in the young minds which are look-
ing for a pleasant and at the same, time interesting
explanation of the things with which they meet.
Since the work of the librarian, especially of
small towns and of high school libraries, is more
and more taking on the duties of a guide and of a
business woman rather than that of a mere guardian
of books, it is becoming necessary that she learn
all the fundamentals of book-making, and of books
also, to fulfill her part in the molding of good citi-
zens.. The Unversity Library has ample facilities
to provide for this instruction and to aid in de-
veloping a spirit of appreciation of book values.

THE FRYING PAN
"-a flash in the Pan."
The Demon Ruby of Jodhp ore
(This story has been fabricated out of thin air
and choice cuts of Ann Arbor atmosphere. It is the
result of a long and arduous study of situations and
conditions - rather more situations than we care
to -mention, and conditions in ec and psych.
We have no hesitation at all in declaring that it
is based on no definite incident in the history of
Ann Arbor. The author offers as his sole aim in
committing this picturesque and somewhat fantas-
tic romance a desire to read color and action into
the well-known campus scene. All rights are re-
served, including that of translation into the Scan-
dinavian, if necessary.)
Chapter I: The Inexplicable Disappearance
It was one of those unfathomable days such as
are often found in southern Michigan. Huge wind-
driven clouds tore across the sky, this way and
that, ripping across the horizon at a great rate-
you could hear them rip miles away. Gusts of rain
and hail drove down State street wreaking a terri-
ble toll of death and destruction right and left (and
sometimes to the north and south). The waves
dashed high and the spray - no, that's chapter
three.
West Hall rocked in the gale and dragged at its
moorings as Bellini Rogers staggered up the steps
to meet his three o'clock class. He entered his
class room and looked about him. It was empty
with the exception of the benches, the Old Mas-
ters (paintings, not the cigars) on the walls, and
half a dozen members of the class.
Right here we, want to pause for a moment and
consider these students. This sturdy little band of
seekers after knowledge had stood staunchly by Bel-
lini Rogers all through those first trying weeks of
the Summer session. They were strangely fascin-
ated by the man. There was something enigmati-
cal, incomprehensible in him that intrigued their
curiosity. Often he would sit throughout the class
hour looking at them as if about to speak. Then
they would sit on the edge of their seats breathless,
waiting for the words that must come. Fancy that,
sitting for an hour without breathing on the edge
of a West Hall bench! There's devotion to learn-
ing for you!
This afternoon Rogers burst into the rom with
more than usual eclat. The class livened up. Per-
haps this was to be one of his good afternoons ! As
he struggled out of his water-soaked dungarees and
brushed the hail stones from his short but neat
mustache he noticed that the weather had changed
and that now a dense fog was rolling across the
campus. A regular soupy fog. (You know that
bean soup at the Tap room, well, like that - only,
of course, without the beans!)
As he looked at the fog billowing against the win-
dows he thought of his Aunt Tibitha, the old county
farm where he had spent so many happy days, and
of his early years at Michigan. Just why the fog
called this to mind we can't say. ThisRogers is a
funny lizzard, anyway, and we don't think so much
of him even if he is to grace these deathless pages
as the hero.
He turned to his pupils. They were all sitting on
the edge of the benches, breathless.
"Don't sit on the dges like that," he shouted at
them brusquely. "You may slide off. And f'r
Mike's sake, don't hold your breath ! You get all
purple ii the face." The class relaxed and leaned
back, heaving a unanimous sigh, The Old Masters
fluttered along the wainscoting. This was Bellini
Rogers 'way of putting his class at ease.
"I shall put a question to you," he announced.
He looked about him. His gaze fell upon a
young girl in the front seat. She was Salome Ven-
tricle, daughter of Dir. Ossian Ventricle, the chief
embalmer for the Health service. She smiled at
him -
"What is the esoteric value of the Areopagiica,
Miss Ventricle ?" he asked.
"I don't know," she breathed.

"Good," he said. "Now tell me who wrote
Jurgen?"
"I's not sure," she replied, looking at him from
under her eyelashes.
"Excellent!" he cried. "Miss Mahaffy, will you
,answer the same question?"
"The book was written by -" began Miss Ma-
haffy.
"Wrong!" shouted Rogers. "Sit down."
Ten minutes later by the town clock, twenty
minutes by the chimes, and an hour and a half
;Greenwich, he dismissed the class. Two people re-
.mained behind. They were (z) Salome Ventricle,
.and (2) a tall, dark young man with a livid scar
across the brow. It was Kar Putt Singh, a man
of whom - but we haven't thought that out yet.
"Pardon me," said Singh, holding out a sheet of
paper to Salome Ventricle, "but you dropped this
out of your notebook."
The fair young girl took the paper and looled at
it. A look of wonderment spread over her face.
She gave a sharp cry. Bellini Rogers turned frcn
the window where he had been watching the fog.
She had disappeared!-
He stooped to pick up the sheet of paper which
had fluttered to the floor. He looked at it. It was
only the torn corner of the sheet. "What does this
mean?' 'he cried, turning to the Hindoo.
Kar Putt Singh had vanished !
Rogers snatched his dungarees and, clutching the
torn scrap of paper in his hand, dashed out of West
Hall and was swallowed up in the fog!
(To be continued)

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A PIECE OF ADVICE
That ought to make a hit with you is;
That you take out a TOURIST BAG-
GAGE policy before you start on your
vacation trip. It covers against loss
by FIRE, PILFERAGE, THEFT, and
the Hazards of transportation.
THE COST IS VERY LOW
BUTLER
INSURANCE
209 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG.
Tel. 401-M
We Habe a Peneil
that Writes with
Ink!
It ought to be in every business
man's pocket:
It's more dependable than the
dead pencil:
The first time you write with it
you'll like it:
And the longer you write with
it the more you'll like it:
No points to sharpen-No points
to break-and best for ruling.
Order by mail-Red for Red Ink
Black for Black Ink

F4 ULIY
s a
SALRI

4.QUALITY.S0
' R~of

4QUALITY.Q
9 TV
Oi

Preserving
Kettles

Unusually good values in pure alumi-
num kettles in suitable sizes for pre-
serving fruits and vegetables-durably
made-heavy roll rim-lipped side and
fitted with sturdy bail and black enam-
eled handle. Several sizes at the follow-
ing low prices:
$1.45 to $3.00 with or without
covers.
JNOU CASCHER CON
Up-to-the-Minute Hardware
Main nr. Washington , Washington nr. Main

Text Books and Supplies for

1d

Both Stores

Q QUALITY.
&,RI~

all Colleges-at
GRAHAM'S

Both Stores

o...
w

Ma ME
Hips I

Cor, State and Monroe

For Sunday Dinner
Ivhy not try the
CUTTING CAFIL

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em
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ua
Imi

...

Dinner Served from 1 to 2 o'clock
chicken Broth with Home-made Noddles
Fruit and Nut Salad
Chicken a la King
Roast Veal with Jelly

Haller & Fuller
Ann Arbor, Mich.

Hashed Potatoes
Radishvs

New Oreen Peas
Celery

DETROIT UNITED LINES
TIME TABLE
Ann Arbor and Jackson
(Eastern Standard Time)
Detroit Limited and Express Carst-6:oo
a. i., 7:0o a. in., 8:oo a. in., 9:oo a. m. and
hourly to 9:o5 p. mn.
Jackson Express Cars (local stops of Ann
Arbor)-9 :47 a. mn. and every two hours to
9:47 P. M.
Local Cars, East Bound-s:53 a. m., 7 :oo
a. m. and every two hours to 9:0op . in.;
r i :oo p. m. To Ypsilanti only-1i :4o p. mn.,
a: sa. m., 1:13 a. m.
To Saline, change at Ypsilanti.
Local Cars, West Bound-7:so a. m., 2:40
p. M.
To Jackson and Kalamazoo-Limited cars:
8:47, 10:47, ainM.; 12:47, 2:47,4:47P. p.
To Jackson and Lansing-Limited:8:47
p. Mn.

Cherry or Lemon Pie
Plain Ice Cream or Strawberry Sundae
Angel Food Cake

Iced Tea

Coffee

Mi

Cocoa
This is a sample of our regular Sunday Dinners, Try us
once and you will be a steady patron.

MII
lu
I
u
TI
mu
mmn
mu

Clean

Cool

CUTTING CAFE
BOARD BY THE MEAL, DAY OR WEEK
For Special Reservations Call 1358-W

HAVE YOU YOUR "FORT"?

In one of Artemus Ward's letters he wrote,
"Every man has got a Fort. It's some men's fort
to do one thing, and some other men's fort to do
,another, while there is numeris shiftliss critters go-
in' round loose whose fort is not to do nothin'."
Though Mr. Ward's grammar may be criticized,
he has nevertheless hit the nail on the head as re-
gards the "forts" of a great many college students.
It is a lamentable fact that too many of the men
and women enrolled in the colleges of this country
are not going through their four years of college
training bcause they desire to enrich their minds
or increase their intellectual capacity, but because
it is the custom for those whose parents can af-
ford it to go to college. A college education does
add social prestige to one, and because of this there
is born a great misunderstanding in the minds of
many college graduates. Though a diploma gives
one social prestige, which really means but little, it
.does not give one business prestige. But it does
give men' and women the ability to better express
their resources - in plain words - to show what
they have in them, and what they have in them de-
.pends largely upon the "fort" which they adopt at
the start of their college career.
The college student should have a definite goal
ahead of him or her to prepare for, and except in
extreme cases, as Artemus Ward points out in the
moral of his letter, "Never. don't do nothin' which
isn't your fort, for ef you do you'll find yourself
splashin' round in the Kanawl, figeratively speak-
in.
Human nature is human nature everywhere. At
Minnesota they go out "river banking" while at
Michigan they go out "canoeing".

1922
S

JULY
of T W

2 3
9 19
23 24
80 31

4
11
18
5

4
12
19
26

1922
T F S
19 14 1
20 21 22
27 28 29

njoy the pleasures gf out-door evenings.
MOSQUITO TALCUM OR CREAM
will add to the comforts.
"THE QUARRY"
PRQQ AND PRESCRIPTION STORE
hon. -oner. State and N. Univ.-C. Claude Drake, Prop.

i

PANAMA AND STRAW HATS
CLEANED THE RIGHT WAY
Prices for cleaning Panamas $1.25 up.
Prices for stiff straypr'.... .75p.
We do o' ly high class work.
FACTORY HAT STORE
617 PACKARD STREET
Telephone 1792

,.

Island

Lake

Pavilion

8 Miles North of Whitmore Lake

Dances

Ike

Every
Tues. Thur.

Fischer's]

Eris

Sat.

Best

Largest and CooleAt Pavilion in t

[he

14

h ulcer is Ulster.

I

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