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July 01, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-01

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C, 4 r

O'ummrr

THE WEATHER
UNSETTLED; PROBABLY
RAIN TODAY

Mfra

4AaiI

ASSOCIATED
PRESS

I"

DAY

AD NIGHT WIRE
sERivicE

I

I

ni, strii'- ATV 7n .

J. . l. . N. iv

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 1, 1922

701Dellm vn"r7 79

_ PR~~ICE FVE ENT

STRIKE STARTS

r1AT

10

A.M.

TODAY

I

Federal

Intervention ,7efused By

Rail Shop

Alen

_

400,000 WOR-KERS
READY FOR NATION
WIDE ROAD TIE- UP
UNION C11iELSF IGAORE SUMMONS
TO APPEAR AT BOARD
INVESTIGATION
MAINTENANCE-OF-WAY
WALKOUT POSTPONED
}Fill Await Action of Leaders Before
Following Move Taken by-
Shop \Employees

Y"s" Favors Football Rulings
As Stopgap To Professionalism

That he was pleased with the rul-
ings made last Wednesday by the Na-
tional Football association and that
they will do much to keep the °college
football player within the ranks' of
the amateurs was the statement made
yesterday by Fielding H. Yost, direc-
tor of athletics at the University.
All members of the organization are
prohibited from hiring college play-
ers while still in college and permit-
ting playing under assumed names
were the most important rulings ef-
fected by the association.
"I am pleased that they take this
stand,"' said Coach Yost. "I hope thai
they will stick to it to the letter." A
fine of $500 is provided for infractions
of this.rule, and for a second offense
the penalty is expulsion. To insure
the enforcement of these rules, each
club is required to make a deposit of
$500, which is forfeited in case of
breach of rules.
That the football promoters are
anxious to get in the good graces of
the public is,,.apparent by the code of
regulations passed at the conference,
which it is expected will keep the
sport safe from unsportsmanlike play-
ing.

BULLETIN

Last fall several Notre Dame and
Illinois players were declared inelig-
ble. to participate in further collegiate
competition of any kind because they
played with two professional teams
at Taylorville, Ill. Much commotion
was daused and a general cleanup was
started. It was found that at several
other colleges athletes had been play-
ing for money In football and base-
ball.
Agitatio'n ensued in all the colleges
and this question was much discussed
by alumni, undergraduates and coach-
es. The fact that summer baseball
provided such an attractive way to
make money also caused argument as
to whether this should not'be allow-
ed. No change in the old eligibility
rules has been made, but steps have
been taken for stricter enforcement
and observance of amateur regula-
tions.,,
STUDE[NTS SEE CITY ON.
FIRST. EXCURSION TRIP
OF SUMMER SESSION
Conducted by Carlton Wells, direc-
tor of the Summer session excursions,

e
y
,
s
t
-

GIVES THREE REASONS
LOCATION OF PROJECT
IN ALABAMA

FOft

(By special Wire)
Washington,-June 3,0.-The admin-
istration, speaking today through the
White House 'on the eve of the called
strike of 400,000 union .railroad shop
workers, declared its determination to
stand squarely behind the railroad
labor board-it was announced late
last night. This is because of the de-
vision of the labor board that th4
shop craftsmen have decided to quite
work tomorrow,
The administration's view, set forth
in language as forcible as the §poke=
inar could command, was that the
labor board is the one agency of the
government dealing with disputes be-
tween the road and their employees
and therefore it would be backed up
by the government.

WHITE EXPLAINS
PRACTICAL VALUE.
iOF MUSCLE SHOALI1

TAHITI SOURCE OF
ROMANCE STORIES.

(By Associate.d Press)
Chicago, June 30.-Federal inter-
vention by the United States railroad
labor board today failed to halt the
strike of 400,000 railway shopmen call-
ed for 10 o'clock tomorrow morning.
Flouting, according to Chairman
Hooper,.the board efforts to effect a
settlement of the shopmen's griev-
ences before the walkout took place,
B. M. Jewell, head of the shop craft
union and the six international union
heads, refused to appear for an of-
ficial investigation of the strike by
the board. No further attempt to
forestall the strike will be made,
Chairman Hooper announced, in ad-
journing the federal bodiy's inquiry.
Maintenance Men Not to Strike
A threatened strike of 400,000 rail-
way maintenance of way employees
was at least postponed, however, by
the board's intervention. The strike,
i this group, which has been expected
to parallel that of the shop men will
not be announced at present but will
await the action of the organization's
executive council here July 3, accord-
ing to the announcement of Pres E. F.
Brable before the board today.
He made this concession, he said,
on the assurance of the board that
present wages would be increased at
any time that increased living costs
warranted. /
Board Accomplishes' Little
The announcement comes as the
first definite accomplishment of the
board, which yesterday stepped into
the threatened railway crisis follow-
~n .strike 'call set for tojnorrow
Wliph included so the shopmren.
Pre ent Jewell's failut to attend
the peace conference brought severe.
condemnation from the chairman of
the board, who, in closing the inquiry;
declared the rail union chief's blood
was "on his own head."
Craft Heads Ignore Sunmmons
Neither Mr. Jewell, nor ahy of the
shop craft heads, answered the board's
summons. Instead they sent a letter
maintaining the right of the shop' inen
to strike' and expressing the belief that
the board hearing would but result in
"a confused and disorderly strike
lnuvement, lackrig authoritative con-
trol and almost _ inevitably resulting
in a mob-like action."_
After questioning Mr. Grebel the
board went into an investigation of

'Robert Louis Stevenson, Cook and
Many Other Men Visited
Island
PROF. CROSS TALS OF
ISLAND SCENIC BEAUTY
Characterizing the Society Islands
of which Tahiti is a member as the
most beautiful of the Pacific. Prof.
A. L. Cross, of the history depart-
ment, gave a picture of the island
of Tahiti which he visited last year.
Tahiti is more than 11,000 iniles
south of Saij Francisco and requires
a sail 'of 28 gays. Professor Cross
viewed the harbor on his entrance to
the island at -snrise with a deep im-
pression of the coloring of the sky
and coral reefs as .gell 'as the steep
mountain guarding the port.
The island is at present under the
French, who have given the natives
a certain amount of autonomy and
are represented by' the leaders of the
anoient native families. The people
are of the Indo-European race with
no negro characteristics.
These ishands have been visited by
many famous men such as Robert
Louis Stevenson, and Captain Cook,
the explorer. They have proved fer-
tile sources for many pieces of liter-
a ture.
'he climate of Tahil is sub-tropi-
cal with temperature ranging from 70
to 89 degrees, that of summer being
-on the average of 10 degrees higher
than that of winter. The beautiful
coloring of the vegetaion combined
wih the mountainous character of the
island makes the island particularly
appealing.
ANN ARBOR NOT EFFECTED
The nation wide shop men's
strike, called for 10 o'clock this
morning, will not effect Ann Ar-
bor, due to the fact that there are'.
no shops on either the Ann Arbor
or Michigan Central railroads
I located here. - I

between 60 and 70 students made the
tour of Ann Arbor and of several
University buildings this afternoon.
Speaking of the trip through the
city, Mr. Wells said, "This tour is an
'innovation. It is the first tqme we,
have attempted anything like it iging I
the Summer session, and we are great-
ly indebted to' the Exchange club fof
their co-operation." The Exchange
club of this city furnished more than
20 automobiles to accommodate the
party,
Leaving the Library at 2 o'clogck,
the party went out WXashtenaw ave-,
nnue, through the residential district,'
and then toured the bulevard. Pass-;
ing through the businesg seption of
the city, the turists took the road to
the Barton Hills !ountry -9plA-
In retprning, they followed the north1
sjhore rives, skirti4g arton lake
and the huron river, finally corning1
down by the Cedar Bend road throughi
Island Park. The party- reached the
Natural Science driveway at 3:30j
o'clock.
The trip through the Library was
conducted by Miss Biethan, of the Li-
brary staff. She explained the
library methods and told of interest-
ing features in the building as, she
led the visitors through the, work-7
rooms, stacks, study halls and reading
rooms.k
Leaving the Libra ry. the party next1
visitedthe Aluinni Vemorial hall,
where they were permilttet o inspect<
the exhibits at random. irectorw
Wells then conduete them to thec
Michigan Wnion. The tourists viewedt
the city fromr the top of the Union
towar, and completed inspection of
the building in time for the lecture in
Natural Science auditorium.
FORMER FACULTY MEN G(BT
IMPORTANT HEALTH POSTS <
Dr. J. H. Cummings, who was form-G
erly director of the Pasteur institutec
at the University and who since theE
close of the war has, been assistant'f
health officer pf the district of Colum-1
bia, has resigned the latter positionr
in order to, accept the, offer made to
him to become chief of the bureauroff
health of Philadelphia.
Philadelphia has the, third largestr
health department in the United States
and it is understood that Dr. Cum-1
mings was given 4 large increase inf
salary in order, to secure him for the ,
position.-

SAYS HENRY FORD MADE,
BEST OFFER FOR PLANT
'U. S. Government Will Expend More
Than $11,000,000 Before Work
Is Completed
In a comprehensive talk illustrated
with motion pictures, Prof. A. H.
White, colonel in charge of work at
Muscle Shoals during the war and
now of the chemical engineering de-
partment, spoke yesterday afternoon
in the Natural Science auditorium
concerning the Muscle Shoals project.
The location of the Muscle Shoals
plant in Alabama was due to three
reasons, he said. First, the desire of
the people in the upperregions of the
Tennessee river for a more navigable
stream with a complete system of
locks. Second, the need of the south-
ern agriculturists for fertilizers, and
third, the sudden demand for nitrate
explosives with our entrance tto the
World War. In . manufa turg ex-
plosives, ammonint ntrate Is made,
which is isel i the preparation of
T. N. T. ag other smokeless explo-
sivcea.
The motia pictures showed the
great scale upon which the whole
plant was constructed, some of t-k%
buildings of which were more. than a
fifth of a mile long. Other buildings,
the towers, reaceb9 a height of more
than 75 feet. The hugeness of the
machinery as well as the extremes
of 'temperature. from nmore than 00
degrees below zero to 4,000 above
were emphasieg"
The plant with the expenditure of'
additional money can be made a great
national asset both in times of peace
in the manufacure 'of fertilizers and
in case of war as a source of the ni-
trates for explosives.
Professor White 'believes that the
best offer yet made the govenment
is that of Henry Ford,.
"TINY" .MWLL ALL-
Norristown, Pa., June 30.-,.ohert
W (_Tiny") Ilgaxwell1, rwer All-Am-
erican guard weight thrower, sports
writer an e 0 the beat known foot-
ball ofiitals in the East, died in a hos-
pital today as a result of injuries re-
ceived in an automobile crash early
Sunday. Percy Sanderson, golf writ-
er, who was also in the wreck, is still
unconscious.
Maxwell was sports editor of the.
Philadelphia Evening Public Ik&eT.
Although he had asen fractured1
ribs and a disloated hip, his con-
dition did s; become critical until,
yestery, when fever and congtion
o 'the lungs set in.-
Maxwell was born in ChicagQ 3;
Years ago, where his mothr awd a
sister, Mrs. Katherine oust, live. He
came into prqWinenoe in 1902 as a.
g;1amO on t he University of Chicago
football team, but won his greatest
honors as a member of the Swarth-
more college eleven in 1904 and 1905.
While in college he was one of the
foremost weight throwers in the East.
After leaving Swarthmore college'
Maxwell became connected with C ica-
go newspapers and came to Philadel-
phia about 10 yer, ago. In the last
few years ha offeiated in some of the1
most important football games Easti
and West.

Kids" Leave For
Fresh Air Camp
Seventy-five happy youngsters from
Detroit, Flint and Ann Arbor began
their summer vacation on Thursday
when the first section of the Univer-
stiy of Michigan Fresh Air camp open-
ed at Pidkney.
Mr. Wallick accompanied the boys
to Ann Arbor on the interurban and
automobiles provided by residents of
the city took them to camp.
This is the first of the four sections
which will be taken to the camp. The
purpose of the camp, as explained by
officials in charge, is to 'take the
boys off the streets and from juvenile
courts of cities throughout the state,
and give them the opportunty 4o
swim, fish, hike and aid in their ment-
al and physical development under
the care of capable leaders.
This is the second summer that the
Fwash. Air camp has been in exist-
ance. It is financed entirely by al-
umni, students and friends of the Un-
iversity.,
There will be men from the Uni-
versity who are trained along speci-
fic lines to take care of the health
of the youngsters and also to teach
them the secrets of the woods..
ENROLLMENT HIGH
lIN STATE SCHOOLS
Attendance Here Proportionally Low
for Summer; Relatively High .
Costs Are Reasons.
FIGURES FOR CAMPS AND
STATIONS ARE NOT KNOWN
Although the exact . figures forj
Summer session registration were not
available, the high interest in sum-
mer educational work is evidenced by
the large enrollment in Michigan.
Throughout the state in the normal
c9.lleges at Ypsilanti, Kalamazoo, and
Marquette together with other insti-l
tution sch as the Detroit Teachers'
lOege, the total enrollment is be-f
lheved to reach close to 11,000.
The attendan~ce here is proportion-
ally low, but this condition has been
attributed, to the'fact that tuition at
Michigan is much higher than at oth-
er- colleges who maintain summer
courses and to the relatively higher1
cost of lIving here.f
Since the numbers for the summer
geological and geographical camps,
the biological statloni, the vocational
students in Detroit, the second term
of Camp Davis engineering xyork and
the second divisions of certain coursesF
in the Medical school will not be
known for a time, Anal figures for£
enrollment caneA yet be obtained.
8 Person, Inunured in Auto Accident
Three persons were injured, one of
them: seriously, when the machine
drivel by Maxwell Kluck skidded intot
the loose gravel on the Salem'road3
about 11:30 Thurs sy night, and turn-
ed turtle twic Kluck received badz
bruiseq sakd nuts !and sustained at
broken rib.
Dean Bates Attends Convention
Dean Harry M. Bates, of the Law1
school, is attending the American Jud-

icature association ,convention in
Cambridge, Mass., as delegate from
the Law school. Secretary of State
Hughea is also a delegate to the con-
Rival Teams Dispute Victory 1
Both the Kiwanis and the Rotary
baseball teams claim the victory of
the game played by them Thursday at-
ternoon. The umpires, however, claim
that neither side won..

ENGIEERS' TASKS
OUTLINED BY DENI
SAYS STUDENTS HAVE GRAVE
DUTIES TO FACE IN
WORLD
PATTERSON GIVES FIRST
ADDRESS AS NEW HEAD
Assistant Dean Expresses Desire 'to
Maintain Relations of
Friendship '

"You have a very great, a very
grave responsibility as engineers. You
must say to yourselves, 'My duty dur-
ing my four years in college lies in
seeking a broad traning to meet this
responsibility.'
This was the message delivered by
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley of the col-
leges of engineering and architecture
before the Summer session engineer-
ing students at their first generalf
assembly at 11 o'clock yesterday in'
the engineering assembly room.
Outlines Profession's Growth
Dean Cooley outlined the tremen-
donus increase in the scope of engi-
=neering since 40 Years- ago, when all
engineering students in the Univer-
sity pursued the only course offered,
civil engineering, each tudent fol-
lowing the same curriculum. Now
six branches of engineering are rep-
resented In the college, with some 20
distinct courses.
Due to the widely different paths
followed now in the profession, men
studying or practicing in one bran'ch
are liable to find themselves out of
touch with the conditions of the oth-
ers, the dean pointed out, and segre-
gation during the college course
would tend to put those in each
branch out of sympathy with those in
the others. "Here all engineers live
under one roof. By daily contact, rub-
bing elbows in class-room, laboratory
and corridor each student comes to
have an increased appreciation of the
others' problems."
Federation Has 60,000 Members
Affiliation of engineers of all sorts
into a national federation has culmin-
ated in a co-operative mnovement to
attempt projects appertaining to the
profession as a whole. The Federat-
'ed American Engineering societies,
stated Dean Cooley, have now through
its 31 member societies an aggregate
membership of more than 60,000.
When all eligible societies have joined
200,000 engineers will be affiliated
with it
Not only the United States, but
England, France, Italy, China, Cana-
da, Australia, and Czecho-Slovakia
have undertaken such federations, and
there is now suggestion of a world
federation of engineers.
"I think the possibilities of such an
organization are very great," exclaim-
ed Dean Cooley. "There is no more
important man in the world than the
engineer - no profession upon which
civilization is more dependent for
material advancement; and his con-
tributions are by no means confined to
material development.
"Cities with 30,000 people living in
single buildings during the day-
time and with homes miles away
would be, an impossibility were it noV
for the recent developmetn of engi-
neering. The great development of
the West is due to the opening of
railroads. Were it not for easy mod-
ern means of transportation, dialects
would be prevalent through the coun-
try, as in the Middle Ages Romance
languages arose in Europe. These
were corruptions of the Latin uni-
versally spoken n earlier times.
"Engineer Creates"
"How is engineering different from
the learned professions: the law, the
ministry, and medicine? A member
of the latter comes into personal con-
tact with the man he serves, While
the 'engineer makes an impression
only through what he creates.. It is
necessary for the engineer so to pre-
pare himself for his profession that it,

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