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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 30, 1922 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-06-30

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THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

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FICIAL NEWSPAPER OF THE SUMMER SESSION OF
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Published every morning except Monday during the Summer
sion by the Board in Control of Student Publications.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
ication of all news dispatches credited to it or otherwise
dited in this paper and the local news published therein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
ssa matter.
Subscription by carrier or mail, $i.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street.
Phones: Business, 96o; Editorial, 2414.
Communications not to exceed 300 words, if signed, the signa-
e notnecessarily to appear in print, but as an evidence of faith,
I notices of events will be published in The Summer Daily at the
cretion of the Editor, if left at or mailed to The Summer Daily
ce. Unsigned communications will receive no consideration. No
nuscript will be returned unless the writer incloses postage.
The Summer Daily does not necessarily endorse the senti-
nts expressed in the communicatonis.
.. EDITORIAL 'STAFF
Telephone 2414
kNAGING EDITOR ................LO J. HERSHDORFER
y Editor............ ................... James B. Young
ght Editors-
Howard A. Donahue Julian E. Mack
rting Editor.................................Jack D. Briscoe
)inen's Editor........ ............Dorothy Bennetts
itorials .. ................. .... ......Herbert S. Case
mor Editor...............................Donald Coney
erary Editor...............................G. D. Eaton
Assistants

W. B. Butler

Leona Horwitz

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 960
BUSINESS MANAGER ...................HEROLD C. HUNT
Advertising. .... .................Townsend H. Wolfe
Publication.......... ..............George W. Rockwood
Accounts.... .......". ................. Laurence H. Favrot
Circulation ............ ....... ........ ....Eidward F. Conlin

Assistants
E. Clark Gibson

H. Goldsmith

Katherine E. Styer

FRIDAY, JUNE 30, 1922
Night Editor-HOWARD A. DONAHUE
Assistant-W. Bernard Butler
STOP THE "FLAPPER" TALK
Why this everlasting squabble about flappers and
the low moral standards of the present generation?
When a preacher or an educator comes home from
a week's fishing trip and discovers that he has
nothing prepared for his next talk, the young peo-
ple of the age almost invariably become the subject
of his impromptu flow of words.
A Gish cannot understand and appreciate the
stream in which he lives, for he knows nothing
else with which he can compare it. There are far
too many similar, to the fish among the reformers
of this country. They lask .vision. They cannot
realize that those things which they condemn in the
the present younger generation were equally obvious
in the younger generations of the past. "Puppy-lov-
ing" has been in existence since the time of Adam
and Eve, and will remain as long as the human ani-
mal exists. The changes in the modes of women's
dress are only natural, and they have been going
on from time immemorable. The most impelling
factor in the recent fashoins is comfort, which inci-
dentally, leads to good health. Yet the fogey re-
former condemns the present costumes as existing
only for sexual attractions.
So many of the critics condemn the young women
of today for benig frivolous and of the butter-fly
type, and then turn around and hurl condemnations
at them for endeavoring to take an equal place with
men in industries and politics. Such criticism is
shallow and lacks any essence of coherence. The
younger women of today are simply adjusting them-
selves to existing conditions of the country. The
customs of a people must change with the changes
of a country, and so if the reformers desire a change
in women's dress, let them first do away with the
high steps on street cars, and golf bug, and the like.
It would be rather difficult for a hoop-skirted young
lady to avoid traffic on Fifth avenue during a -busy
hour.
THE NEW DEAN
Miss Hamilton's acceptance of the position of dean
of women seems a satisfactory solution of a particu-
larly hard problem. As the dean of women she will
occupy a place which is at times difficult. Although
at the present time, more than formerly, the wo-
men of the University co-operate in upholding rules
that have been and will be made, there is a tendency
for certain individuals to rebel against regulations
that restrict their activities and pleasures. Because
of her experience with girls in Girls' clubs Miss
Hamilton will be able to deal with women of the Un-
iversity in an understanding manner and in such a
way that they will understand the benefits of these
regulations to 'themselves and to the women as a
whole..
The tasks which the new dean will have to under-
take are .fficult and often subject to criticism. Be-
cause of her former positions she will better qualify
to solve problems of housing, and also looking aft-
er the moral welfare of the women. Her position
as director of women's clubs will be a great aid in
helping to develop those organizations already form-

ed on the campus, and in stimulating organizations
that would be of aid to the women. These factors
have necessarily been considered in appointing the
new dean, and Miss Hamilton will find that she has
the hearty co-operation and good will of all the
students of the University.
SUMMER PUBLICITY
It has been a year since the Michigan News
Bureau was first organized at the University by
Sigma Delta Chi, national professional journalism
fraternity, to serve as a medium through which the
right kind of news concerning the University might
be distributed to the papers throughout the country.
The bureau was installed for the principal purpose
of bringing to the attention of University officials
the dire need of a University publicity director. To
date no such appointment has been made, but those
connected with the Michigan News Burean are sin-
cere in their belief that its work has not been fruit-
less, and, with the recommendation of President
Burton, are going to continue their work through-
out the Summer session.
The news bureau has been of valuable service to
the University in more Ways than one during the
past year. It has not only stimulated the outflow of
desirable publicity, but it has very noticeably de-
creased the type of publicity that has been injurious
to Michigan. Though it has not received official
recognition, its work has been careful, thorough,
and beneficial. It is a fine thing that the Michigan
News Bureau will continue to function during the
Summer session.
Already looking forward to no classes July4?
.... ........ ... ................... ...
iTH E FRYING PAN.
"-a flash in the Pan."
...ln l~~n~~ ...... .$............. ........n.....n....lS
Yesterday we met a guy
Who is our friend;
And warily we told him
A funny, funny story
We meant to use next day
In the column.
At which he laughed right heartily,
He did-
Our heart went out to him
And we read him the whole
Colyum.
And he sat down on the curbstone
And joined with us in
Happy laughter.
And we were glad-
Pollyanimated with smiles.
BUT
Later we learned that he had just
Got a letter from his girl!
Today's Feuileton
While galloping down Ann Arbor's Great White
Way to pay the Dean a social call, we sighted off
the starboard bow our friend Archie Pangborn,
one of nature's noblemen. Archie's bull pup, Cas-
anova, was taking him out for a stroll. They hove
to and cast anchor on seeing me.
"What-o,.or what have you?" I cried, as Casanova
sniffed the cuffs of my select tweed trouserings.
"Caochouc !" hailed Archie, who is a kindred
spirit. "Guess what, Cass and I have committed
mayhem."
I indicated interest.
"We were eating at a maurauded hash-house-its
terrible the way these summer school buzzards have
et the town out-and Cass wandered into the
kitchen and argued with the domestic feline. As
J saw the carcass being carried out to the morgue,
it was a large and brawny cat, but bull pups are
bull pups, cats to the contrary.
"That irritated the proprietor and all he gave

me to eat was a Summer Session special. Never
look one in the eye. A Summer school special is
what is left. They take whatever is in the kitchen
at the time and divide it by the number in the party.
I got a ripe olive, seven pork and beans and a wan
lamb chop. When the bill came in there was an
item for one cat.
"I didn't have a cat," I told the waiter.
"No," says he, "but your dog did."
"Now Casanova hadn't eaten the cat, he's a
high-bred dog. He just mangled it a little. I don't
give a shrill shriek in Hades about the money but
it's the principle of the thing. And the low lived
maniac that keeps the joint had the neurotic energy
to tell me that he wouldn't have cared so much only
there were customers present and they couldn't very
well use the defunt for hamburg."
"No!" I cried, horrified, and we all went to the
Union for a drink.
The He-and-She Story
He-I'm half inclined to kiss you.
She-How stupid of me, I thought you were
merely round-shouldered.

i

B~oth St~ores

Both M~ores

GR AHAM'S

ATTENTION

Fraternities, Sororities, Clubs
and other organizations
can be well taken
care of by calling
ANN ARBOR REALTY
Nattonal Bank Building
Phone┬░40

t
f outdoy the pleasures of out-door evenings.
MOSQUITO TALCUM OR CREAM
will add to the comforts.
" H E U 0A R RY"
DRIUG AND PRESCRIPTION STORE
Phone 308-Corner S. State and N. Univ.-C. Claude Drake, Prop.

rI

1 4i

i

Ann Arbor
Savings Bank
Two Offices:
N. W. Corner Main and Huron
707 N. University Ave.

I

lil,

If

I

n_

1j

YOU WILL FIND THE
Farmers
and Mechanics Bank

m

Text an dSupplies for

A pleasant, conven-
ient and SAFE place
to transact your
e business.

TWO OFFICES:
101-105 South Main St.
330 South State St.
Nickels' Arcade
Member of the Federal Reserve

CORONA is the type-
writer you can fold up,
take with you, typewrite
anywhere.
It's the simplest, sturdiest,
handiest writing machine in
the world. Corona weighs
6Y2lbs., yet does the work
of a big machine. Phone
now for a demonstration
0. D. MORRILL
17 Nickels Arcade
The Typewriter
and Stationery Store
rI11111 1111111 1Il' lll111liii 11111 U 111111111┬▒
B0OA R D
For a limited number of
STUDENTS
Good Home Cooking i
At Moderate Prices
SMRS. PHILLIPS
523 Forest Ave.

Island Lake

8 Miles North of Whitmore Lake

Dances

Every'
Tues. Thur.
Fri. Sat.

"Theobald is not a man to go
"No? Why?"
"No. He never stops rowing;

rowing with."
a minute."
CALIGULA.

Largest and Coole ft Pavilion in t

I

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