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June 29, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-06-29

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SHOWERS
TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, JUNE 29, 1922

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1250 LIBRARINl S
FOM CONVENTION
TOBEHEREODT
HENDERSON, CLEMENTS, BISHOP
WILL ADDRESS VISITING
GROUPS
WILL HOLD AUXI IARY
MEETINGS IN LIBRARY
Great .Lakes Libraries as History
Sources, Bibliographes'
Subject
One thousand and fifty of the dele-
gates attending the annual convention
of the 'American Library association
in Detroit this week have secured
tickets for the special trip to Ann Ar-
bor today under the auspices of the
association. University library staff
members, numbering 70, and libra-
rians from neighboring cities, are ex-
pected to raise the total attendance
at the sessions here to more than
1,250. The Bibliographical Society of
America and the association's Uni-
versity Extension Service round table
will meet at' the Library. All'the del-
egates will attend a luncheon at the
Union and a complimentarVy organ re-
cital in Hill auditorium, and willl
participate in an inspection of thet
six libraries of the University.
The University Library Extensionc
Service round table will convene at
10 o'clock at the General Library un-
der the direction of Edith Thomas,
chairman. Miss Thomas is ai assist-
ant in charge of the University Li-
brary Extension Service. Prof. W.
D.'Henderson, director of the Univer-
sity Extension division, will deliver a
greeting to the visiting members.
f'orun1 Teaching and the Package
Library?' will be the subject of a talk
by Aihere S. Scott of the departmentv
pf debating and public discussion, ex-
tension division, University of iWscon- a
jxtensio Service Discussions
-Mary Pratt of the bureau of public
discussion, extension division, Uni-
versity of Indiana, will discuss li-
brary extension service to club wom-
en. LeNoir Dimmitt, extension libra-
rian of the extension division, Univer-
sity of Texas, will speak upon sourc-
es of material for library extensiona
service. Organization and develop-e
ment of material for bulletins to be
used in library extension servic
will be the topic developed by Louis
R. Wilson, director of the extension
division of the University of North
Carolina.
Arrangements for a second session
of the extension service round tablet
will be made should occasion de-
mand.V
Delegates not attending the exten-t
lion service round table will leavef
Ptroit at 10:30 o'clock on. a speciala
Michigan Central train, arriving at1
Aanq Arbor at 11:30 o'clock. They willa
proceed directly to the Union fore
lunch. Regent William L. Clements h
of Bay City will extend a welcome toa
the visitors on behalf of the Univer-c
sity, and Professor Henderson willv
deliver an address upon, "Adult Edu-n
cation-a Common Interest of Uni-a
versities and Public Libraries," as af
part of the after-luncheon program.o
Delegates will be conducted on ans
inspection tour of the libraries of the
University, after lunch. They are in-
vited to attend an organ recital byr

Henry Russell Evans at 3:30 o'clock8
in Hill auditorium.
Bibliographer's to Meet u
"Resources for American History in
Libraries, Public and Private, of the s
(Gontinued on Page Four) c
VASSAR ORADUATE APPOINTED $
NEWBERy lOUSE DIRECTOR c
Announcement was made this morn-s
ing of the appointment by the di-i
rectors of Betsy Barbqur house, ofs
Miss Jeannette Perry of Grand Rapids, t
to the position of social director of t
that dormitory for the coming school t
year. She will succeed Miss Eleanord
Sheldon, the present social director,
who recently announced her engage-e
ment to Dr. Meyers. f
Miss Perry is a graduate of Vassare
college and was active in Red Cr6ss t

I t nr flU- i n v ..T ,: ,I -

Si RSONS RECEIVE
SUMMER STUDENTS

Faculty and students of 'the Sum-
mer session gathered together yester-
day afternoon in Alumni. Memorial
hall as the guests of President Mar-
ion L. Burton and Mrs. Burton. This
is the first opportunity which has
been afforded those attending the
Summer session to meet the President
and faculty of the University.
A number of women of net year's
senior class who are here for the
summer acted as ushers and showed
the newcomers through the building.
The art exhibits were open for in-
inspection by the guests. The Uni-
versity botanical gardens furnished
flowers and ferns for the building.
WESB ROOK REACHES
NET SEMI FINALS
Eiminates Sanders, of-Dartmouth, in
Fifth Round by Straight
Sets
WOLVERINE DOUBLES TEAM
WINS FIRST MATCH 6-, 6-4.
Philadelphia, June 28.-Two Mid-
dle Westerners, one Easterner and one
Pacific coast representative remain in
the singles championship tournament
of the Intercollegiate Tennis associa-
tion as a result of the fifth round
played today at the Merion Cricket
club. The, survivors are Walter Wes-
brook, Michigan; Wray Brown, Wash-
ington university, St. Louis; Neer,
Leland Stanford and L. E. Williams,
Yale.
Brown caused the' first big upset of
the tournament, when he took the
measure of James Davies, Leland
Stanford, 6-1, 1-6, 6-4.
Andrew Morgan, captain of the Uni-
versity of Pennsylvania team, put up
a hard battle against Neer, the pres-
ent champion, but lost, 8-6, 6-3.
Wesbrook entered the semi-final
round by eliminating C. V. Sanders,
Jr., captain of the Dartmouth team,
in straight sets, 7-5, 6-2,
In the other fifth round contest Yale
scored a win over Harvard when Wil-
iams defeated Duance, 3-6, 6-1, 6-2.
In the doubles Walter' Wesbrook
and George Reindel, Michigan, defeat-
ed Gerald Emerson and E. G. Mc-
Laughlin, Columbia, 6-3, 6-4.
HEALTH SER VICE
OPEN FOR SUMMER
University Health service is ex-
tended to all students who have paid
the reular Summer session fees
which entitle them to medical atten-
tion, advice and necessary treatment
free. Included in this free service
are X-ray exalinations, drugs, dress-
ings, vaccines, antitoxin, minor oper-
ations, and eye refractions. Emerg-
ency major operations and complete
hospital care are also provided free
at the University hospital when such
cases are approved by the Health ser-
vice director. Elective operations are
not so considered, and students should
always consult the Health service of-
fice before going to the hospital in
order that there will be no misunder-
Aanding regarding charges.
The Health service dispensary, lo-
cated iat 226 S. Ingalls street, near the
rear of Hill auditorium, is open from
8:0 to 12 daily except Sunday, and.
from 1:30 to 6 o'clock except Sat-
urday and Sunday.
Room calls are made by the Health
service staff, for which a fee of $1 is

collected if the call is made between
the hours of 6 a. m. and 9 p. m.--and
$2 it between 9 p. en. and 6 a. m. The
carnpus telephone operator maintains
a schedule of the hours of the Health
service staff and all calls, except dur-
ing the regular office hours. Calls
should, after regular office hours of
the Health service, be telephoned to
the campus operator who will be able
to locate the doctor who may be on
duty for that day.
The University Health service was
established at Michigan in 1913, and
from its first appearance to the pres-
ent time has been a great factor in
the prevention of disease and the care
(Continued on Page Four)

R~ft0BOARDMAY
TAKE JURI5DICTION
TO STOPWALKOUT
ULTIMATUI LEAVES LITTLE LEE-
WAY FOR AVOIDANCE OF
STRIKE
UNIONS AND OPERATORS
MAY CONVENE TODAY
Two Loopholes Remain to Preyent
Issuance of Strike Call to
Shopmen
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, June 28. - Two possible
means of avoiding the threatened rail
strike of 400,000 shop men suggested
themselves to raiiroad circles tonight
following what P. M. Jewell, head of
the shop union, termed the "last
word" to the railroads in the union
ultimatum sent to the railway repre-
sentatives last night.
The executives were scheduled to
meet in Chicago tomorrow afternoon
and local railroad executives today
said the shopmuen's proposal of at
truce would undoubtedly receive at-
tention.
Lefves Little Leeway
President Jewell's telegram last
night to T. Dewitt Cuyler, chairman of.
the executive committee, left little
leeway for avoiding the strike, it was
felt by railroad officials today.
The certain rejection of the union
proposal therefore left, in the opin-
ion of railroad men, but two possible
loopholes to avoid issuance of the
strike call.
One was that a conference betweena
the union leaders and the executives;
might be called tomorrow and if noj
other agreement was reached, a tech-i
nical dispute might be announced,
over which the railroad labor board,
acting under authority of the trans-
portation act, could take jurisdiction
and act to prevent a walkout.
May Order Men Backa
The other was that if the strike
was called, the board could also takel
jurisdiction under the act, and thet
ground that the strike would inter-x
rupt commerce and order the menl
back to work.
Ben W. Hooper, chairman of the,
board, refused to comment on theset
two possibilities tonight. Mr. Jewell,
while refusing also to discuss the pos-t
sibilities of the conference tomorrow'
with the rail executives, said that a*
statement would be gien out tomor-
row afternoon about the hour thet
executives go into session.

I

EDUCATION SCHOOL
REGISTRY TRIPLES'
With the School of Education en-
rollment more than three times as
large as last year, this increase from
52 to 176 continued to be the out-
standing feature of the Summer ses-
sion enrollment. Of this number, 68
have entered to take Fielding H.
Yost's courses in athletic coaching
and administration. The 68 represent
16 states as follows: Michigan 31, In-
diana 5, Ohio 5, Pennsylvania 4, Tex-
as 4, Illinois 3,, New York 3, Arkansas
3, Oklahoma 2, Wisconsin 2, Arizona
1, Iowa 1, Rhode Island 1, South Da-
kota 1, Tennessee 1, and Massachu-
setts 1. One woman has enrolled in
the school for coaches, haying pre-
viously taken baseball at Hfarvard.
The School of Educaticn has many
well-known educators in attendance,
such as Deputy Superintetident of
Public Instruction W. fl. Coffey from
Lansing C. L. Spain, deputy superin-
tendent of Detroit public schools, C,
L. Dawson, assistant superintendent
of the Grand Rapids public schools,
and E. J. Cameron, state secretary of
the Michigan State Teachers' asso-
ciation.
IRISH FACTIONS
IN FIERCE BATTLE

E

REGENTS APPOINT P-ROFI. GEORGE
W. PATTERSON TO SUCCEED BUTTS;
NEW DEAN OF WOMEN SELECTED

JEAN HA1UILTON APPROVED TO
SUCCEED lRS. MYRA B.
JORDAN
NEW DEAN WILL HAVE
RANK OF PROFESSOR
Has Had Extensive Expertence in Rec-
reation Work Among
Women
Selection of a dean of women for
the University was announced yes-
terday following the acceptance of
the position by Miss Jealn Hamilton,
of New York. The new dean will as-
sume her duties here on Sept. 11.
Miss Hamilton is at present secre-
tary of the National League of Wo-
men's clubs, an organization doing ac-
tive work in 18 states. She is a grad-
uate of Vassar college, having re-
ceived an A.B. and an A.M. from that
institution.
New Privileges Added
Through the recommendation of the
Senate council and approval of the

INEW

'ASSISTANT

ENGINERING

DEAN ON FACULTY FOR
383 YARS

Machine Guns,
ed Cars;

Mortars, and Armor.
Being Used in
Fight

TURNER STAYS IN IONDON
PREPARINQ TO WRITE

TE~XT

Prof. Edward E. Turner, of the his-
tory department, who has been on
leave of absence for nearly a year, is
still In London. It is probable that he
will remain there until his return in
September, as he writes that he is very
busy.
The author of several text books,
one of which is used in the course of
European history in this University,
Professor Turner is now occupied in
research work in the public re.cords.
office, examining documents and gath-
ering data for a new book. This work
on which he has been engaged for sev-
eral years, will be an elaborate treat-
ise on the subject of the origin and de-
velopment of the British cabinet. It
will be by far the most extensive work
he has yet attempted.
SUMMER DAILY TRYOUTS
WANTIED
Students attending the Sum-
mer session and who wish to try
out for positions on The Su iner
Michigan Daily staff should re-
port between 1 and 5 o'clock
in the afternoon at the Press
building.
Tryouts for the business de-
partment should see Herold C.
Hunt, business manager; for the
editorial department, James
Young, city editor.

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INSURGENT VOMMANDER IS
REPORTED- AMONG WOUNDED
(By Associated Press)
Dublin, June 28.-A fierce battle has
been raging since dawn between the
regular Irish Republican army troops
and the irregulars under Rory O'Con-'
nor for the possession of the Four
Courts, recently seized by the latter,
It is believed the casualties will be
large. Armored cars, trench mortars
and machine guns are being used.
The irregular Irish Republican army
troops who were defending Fowler
hall, evacuated that place this after-
noon. They proceeded to a large hotel
belonging to Alderman Moran, where
they began erecting defenses.
A rumor that Rory O'Connor, the
Republican insurgent cor niandant,
had been wounded during the fighting
was in, circulation this afternoon. No
confirmation was obtainable.
The Irish provisional governmental
took forceful action today against the
insurgent of the Irish Republican
army infesting the Four Courts build-
ing where the insurgents were en-
trenched and opening a hot attack
when a demand for surrender was ig-
nored,
Avoid Firing Records
The official troops command the
Four Courts building from all sides,
but the nature of the structure made
an assault difficult and as the build-
ing contains irreplacable legal docu-
ments there waa no disposition to fire
the structure as a° means of ousting
the insurgents.
It was learned during the morning
that the official, forces were using
against the Four Courts two 18-pound-
ers firing high explosive shells with
delayed action fuses. They fired at
first from the high ground in the
neighborhood of Christ church cathe.-
ral at a range of 200 yards. By 11:30
o'clock a breach had been made in one
wall of the building. The idea of us-
ing high explosive shells was to mini-
mize the risk Cf fire. The guns later
w re moved to fresh positions where
the advantages of direct fire seemed
greater,
Demand General's Release
The attack on the insurgents was
preceded by the sending of two ulti-
matums to O'Connor. One of these de-
manded the release of Lieut- Gen.
O'Connell, assistant chief of staff of
the regular forces, who was seized
yesterday by the insurgents.
The other set a time limit after
which an attack would be made..
Several buildings near the Four
Courts were commandeered by the ir-
regulars this afternoon. In addition
to Moran hotel they took over the Clar-
ence, hotel, on the quays opposite the
Four Courts. Bamba Hall, and the
Ladies Trade union building on North
Great Georges street.

Board of Regents, the new dean will
have full professorial ranking and
will be, therefore, a member of the
University Senate, and will sit reg-
ularly -In the conference of deans.
Jean Hamilton was born at Oswego,
N. Y., and educated in the public
schools of that city. She received
her A.B. from Vassar in 1899 and an
A.M. from the same institution in 1901.
She was an honor student and a mem-
ber of Phi Beta Kappa. During the
past few years Miss Hamilton has
been assoc'iated with work along the
lines of general rebreation for girls
and women. She is at present general
secretary of the National League of
Girls' clubs.
Is Highy Recommended
She comes to the University highly
recommended by the officers of the
clubs with whom she has been as.o-
dlated and with other people in college
executive positions who have come in
contact with her, -
Miss Hamilton was the first choice
of former Dean Myra B. Jordan as her
successor. Mrs. Jordan said, "Miss
Hamilton possesses a rare charm and
personality. She is unquestionably
my first choice for the position of
dean of women of Michigan."
Artisis Open 1922
Summer Conerts
(By Herbert S. Case)
Before a large and very appreciative
audienge the University School of
Music gave its first program of the
Faculty Summer Concert series in
Hill auditorium last night, with Harry
R. Evans, organist, Otto O. Patton,
tenor, ,and Emily Mutter, violinist,
as artists.
Mr. Evans opened the evening with
two selections on the pipe organ and
responded to the applause of the-au-
dience by encoring with a rendition of
a, popular waltz.
"I Heard a Cry," sung by Mr. Pat-
ton, brought out the finest qualities
of that tenor's voice. Though Mr. Pat-
ton's voice was lacking in strength
and volume, it redeemed itself by the
richness of its tone. The tenor's selec-
tions were very well received.
The numbers rendered by Emily
Mutter, the child violinist, were ex,
,ceptionally good; and were received
with much enthusiasm. Miss Mutter
played difficult pieces with remarka-
ble skill fore one her age.
"Concerto" (last movement) by Men-
delssohn, 'rendered by Miss Mutter,
was a very long and difficult piece
which she played with a skill fast ap-
proaching that of a master. It. was
a delighted audience that demanded
her return for an ancore.
Miss Ava Comin and Miss Dorothy
Wines-Reed were the accompanists.

MERGER OF HOSPITALS
EFFECTIVE TOMORROW
Many Other Important Appointments
to Staff Positions Made
at Ifeeting
Prof. George Washington Patterson,
'for the past 33 years a member of the
faculty of the engineering college, was
named ss assistant dean of that col-
lege at the meeting of the Board of
Regents in session here yesterday.
Professor Patterson became an in-
structor in the elecrical engineering
department in 1889, was assistant
professor and later Junior professor
of physics, and was promoted to a
professorship of electrical engineering
in 1905.
The renewal of the fellowship in
highway transport and engineering
established by Roy Chapin of the
Hudson Motor company and Alex
Dow of the Detroit Edison company
was accepted by the Regents, as well
as a scholarship in marine engineer-
ing established by the American com-
mittee of Lloyd's Registry of Ship-
ping. A similar scholarship has been
established at Massachusetts Institute
of Technology.
Approve Miller Appointment
Approval was given to the appoint-
ment of Prof. H. W. Miller as head of
the department of descriptive geome-
try and drawing. Miller has also ac-
cepted the post of chief designer of
all artillery for the American armies.
The resignation of Prof. John W.
Sherrick of the obstetrics and gyno-
cology department of the Medical
school was accepted and the appoint-
ment of Dr. Roland Cron as his suc-
cessor was approved.
An alumni residing in Detroit,
whose name was not given, gave a
fellowship of $500 in social science
for the Graduate school for the year
1922-23.
Prof. Edwin R. Stason of the electri-
cal engineering 'department was
granted a leave of absence for one
year. He will pursue studies in law
and engineering in public utilitis.
The resignation of Roy W. Elliott, in-
structor in civil engineering, was ac-
cepted. He will go to Topeka, Kans.;
to become superintendent of the
buildings and grounds department of
the public schools of that city.
Final steps were taken looking to
the merger of the Homoeopathic and
University hospitals in the Univer-
sity. Th merger becomes effective
tomorrow.
Dr. Charles Fries washpromoted to,
an assistant professorship of Eng-.
lish. The Regents took steps for turn-
ing over one of the buildings of the
Homoeopathic Medical school to the
University Health service to be used'
as its headquarters.
D. W. Springer was appointed aud-
itor of thepUniversity.pDr. JohnB.
Yeomans of Johns Hopkins Univer-
sity hospital was appointed an in-
structor in internal medicine. Miss
Margaret Kelso was made assistant
to the professor of internal medicine,
Prof. John Aire was made director o1
the Engineering shops. Dr. Eugene
S. McCartney of the University of
Pennsylvania was appointed general
editor of graduate publications in the
University.
Schmitt to Leave
Prof. H. M. Schmitt of the econom-
ics department was granted a leave
of absence for the coming year. He
will pursue professional work in ac-
counting during that time. Dr. Emer-
son H. Swift of Princeton received
an appointment to an instructorship
in Greek.
The appointment of Miss Jeannette
Perry as director of Betsy Barbour

house was approved by the Regents.
Regents Beal, Hubbard, and Cle-
ments were appointed as a committee
of Regents to ' visit the engineer
'camps at Douglass Lake. Robert An-
gell, '22, was appointed assistant in
the office of the Dean of Students.

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