100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

June 16, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-06-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'I----

'ummer

THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SHOWERS
TODAY

Siar 43111

~aAaiI4

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NGHT WIRE
SERVICE

A

_ t rte- r w.
VOL. XIII. No. 1 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 1922 PRICE FIVE CENT
r ,.

LAWS OPEN

7 TH COMMENCEMEN

0

nnrnnr BANDWILL TAKE
U-N]PPRED B TRIP TO TORONTO
Forty men will be carried by the
FuR FIRST LSH Varsity band on its trip to Toronto on
June 19. The band will play at the
IE three day international convention
of the Kiwanis club which will be held
in that city. Director Wilfred Wilson
HILL, '11, TO CAPTAIN AGGREGA- and Faculty Manager R. A. Campbell
TION OF FORMER MICH- will accompany the men.
IGAN STARS The Michigan state association of
Kiwanis clubs will entertain the band
at Detroit in connection with the dele-
BOWERMANS TO PUT gations from Chicago and other Illin-
ON FATHER-SON ACT ois cities.
Fisher Announces Same Lineup as
Last Game; Vick Only Veteran
ssingPR
Alumni from the class of '95 to the
class of '21 are back in town anxious
to shwteVarsity baseball team how
baseball was played in thieir day.
Stars from the major leagues, and oth- Conservative Estimate Places 1922;
ers who have played little or no ball Figures at 3,250; May Reach
since their college days will be back 3,500 1
in uniform today and tomorrow to--
try to humble the 1922 Varsity. Nor- 475 DISTINCT COURSES OF
man Hill, '11, who has charge of the INSTRUCTION ON PROGRAM
alumni team, had his men out on
Ferry field yesterday cavorting around Basing their estimates on compar-
and going through their paces. There ative figures of former years, officialst
are so many good players that he was in charge of the Summer session de-1
unable to announce a definite line- clare that the enrollment this sum-t
up, but it is expected that they will mer will by far exceed that of other
all play a few innings. sessions. A conservative statementt
- Van Boven at Short places the enrollment figure for thist
Pete Van Boven, '21, captain of last Summer session, at approximately
year's team, has short stop cinched 3,250, while it is expected that it may
and will probably play at that posi- reach 3,500.E
tion all through the game. On first Classes in the Law school will be-
base Hill, '11, and Newell, '20, will gin Tuesday, June 20, the day fol-}
play, each occupying the initial corner lowing the close of commencement ex-
for several innings. Hill is managing ercises. The other departments of thel
the team and to him goes the credit University will not begin until Mon-t
of getting together the large number day, June 26.
of stars who make up the alumni ag- Many University faculty men who
gregation. have accepted offers to teach in othert
Caswell, '16, Walterhouse, '17, and universities during the summer
Duncanson, '12, are the second base- throughout the country have already
men available while at third base. left for their destinations, while sever-
Tommy Hughitt, '15, and Joe Karpus, al of the 35 men of other faculties
'21, the hero of the 18-inning Wiscon- who will be on the University roster
sin game, will be on third base. Hugh- have already arrived..
itt was better known as a football Dean Edward H. Kraus, who is in
player than as a diamond star, but he charge of the Summer session, an-
played both sports while in college. nounces that 475 distinct courses of
Father and Son in Lineup instruction will be offered this sum-
Elmer D. Mitchell, '12, intramural mer. The Literary college will have
director of the University and cap- the greatest number of courses, the dif-1
tain of the baseball team in 1-912, ferent subjects totaling 384. School
will be one of the center fielders, teachers and superintendents will re-
while Lathers, '11, will take his place ceive the benefit of the majority of the
for part of the game. In right field courses, 352 of the 475 being designed
"Johnny" Perrin, '21, will be seen. He especially to aid them in their pro-n
is well known for the long hits he fession.c
made while on the Varsity, and was During the period from 1916 to 1921,d
one of the best batters in the Confer- Michigan has developed its Summer n
ence. E. Bowerman, '20, will alter- sessions to a greater extent than anyd
nate with him. The latter is the son of the 20 other large universities which
of F. Bowerman who caught back in offer summer instruction, the Univer- t
'95 and who is back today to resume sity's increase being larger by 10 per r
the mitt. Seldom are father and son cent than the others. Between 60 and t
seen in the same lineup. The elder 70 per cent of the summer enrollment e
Bowerman caught for the Giants for is secured from students in regular at- y
many years and for eight years was on tendance at the University.
the receiving end of Christy Mathew- t
son's deliveries.o
Othercatchers will be Rogers, '13, SUMMER D AILY TO t
who caught for St. Louis; Genebach, PRINT Tw O EXTRASn
'21, who caught and also played in
the outfield;and Davis, '07, Nieman, t
117, and OhImacher '20 will hod Full details of commencement ac- n
'17,n anftfeldo sihr,'0oil.tivities and a list of events together I
n '15, had been expected to with the time and place that they oc- p
Feruso, '5, ad eenexpcte tocur will be printed i w xr d-
pitch for several innings but he has ill be prine in two extra edi- y
been unable to come back because ions of The Summer Michigan Daily n
n Hoeverherbekremanse which will be publisbed tomorrow and p
of sickness. However, there remains Monday.
a formidable array of hurlers to callTy
from. Campbell, '11, Utley, '03, David- The Monday extra will be sold on
son '7,Seleile, '0 ndBlanding, tesre immediately following the g
son, '17, Schedler, '20, and B llcommencement program in Hill audi- a
'11, will all be on the bench and will torium, and will contain President y
probably all get a chance to hurl an Marion L. Burton's baccalaureate ad-

Inning or two In one of the two games. dress and the address by Secretary of
Vick in St. Louisdsa d Chesans Hugheas wof h
The Varsity has put in several days State Charles Evans Hughes, as well '
of practice and is back to mid-season as other details ofthe morning's f
form. The entire squad will be on program. 1
hand.wthhe exrepstuidonofbCaptain All extra editions may be obtained
hand with the exception of apanduring the street sales and at The
"Ernie" Vick who has reported to the Summer Daily office in the Press
St. Louis team. Coach Fisher has two building. The Summer Michigan
catchers left, Blott and Swanson, and Daily will begin regular publication
both will undoubtedly get a chance. two days prior to the opening of thei
The lineup will be the same as in twmmdaysesiotothJunin24. h
the last game, except that since Vick S
is not here, the catcher will bat just t
before the pitcher instead of in the 23 Classes Gather at Yale t
cleanup position, where Vick was bat-1 Twenty-three classes dating from t
ting. 1869 will hold re-unions at Yale uni- a
Knode will be on first base, Wimbles ; versity during commencement period l
(Continued on Page Four) this year.b

INDORSESNATION
WIDE COAL-STRIKE
NO DISSENTING BALLOT CAST;
ACTION APPROVES ROAD
WALKOUT
RAIL UNION LEADERS
WILL ABIDE BY VOTE
Resolutions Adopted Favoring Strong
"Organization to Combat the
Open Shop"
(By Associated Press)
Cincinnati, 0., June 15.-By the vote
of every delegate, the American Feder-
ation of Labor convention here today
indorsed the nation-wide coalstrike
that since April 1 has kept a half mil-
lion miners from work and also in-
dicated, by a demonstartion, its ap-
proval of the present walkout of more
than 1,000,000 railroad workers.
The demonstration was loud here
from all parts of the big convention
hall when B. M. Jewell, president of
the railway employees department of
the- federation, told the convention
that the rail union chiefs would not
interfere to stop a strike.
"It is believed," declared Mr. Jew-
ell, "that the membership is prepar-
ed to meet the test, and if they so
decide, their decision will be complied,
with."
The "one big union" plan advocated
by William L. Foster, was rejected by
the convention without debate.
Plans for unionizing unorganized
workers were also made by the con-3
vention, which in addition adopted a
resolution declaring in favor of an
"intensive organization to combat the
open shop."
9LUMNAE REVIEW19AGUE1
WOR T COUNCIL MIMTI

200 ALUMNI HERE,
THURSDAY'S TOTAL
- More than 200 visiting alumni had
enrolled at the registration booth a
Alumni Memorial hall up to a late houi
last night, Wilfred B. Shaw, secretary
of the Alumni association, announced
In spite of this low figure, however,
Secretary Shaw declared that the en-
rollment this morning and afternoon
would bring the registration to a high
total. It is estimated that 2,000 grad-
uates will return for their class re-
unions and the commencement exer-
cises.
TERMS OF LATST
IRISH PACT GIVEN
New Constitution Provides for Con-
nection With British
Crown
DOCUMENT PLACES IRELAND
ON SAME BASIS AS CANADA
BULLETIN
London, June 15. - Arthur Griffith,
before leaving London tonight, made
a statement on the constitution, in
which he said:.
"The constitution is that of a free
and democratic state, and under it Ire-
land for the first time in centuries
secures the power to- control and de-
velop her own resources and live her
own national life."
(By Associated Press)
London, June 15.-The draft of the
new Irish constitution made public to-
night on the eve of the Iris.i election,
gives, as the document itself states,
force of law to the Anglo-Irish treaty
and expressly declares that any pro-
vision of the constitution or any
amendment thereto, or any law enact-
ed under the constitution, which is in
any respect repugnant to the treaty,
shall be void and inoperative.
The consUtution thus embodies con-
nection with the British Crown, as al-
ready established in the treaty, and
generally places the situation between
Ireland and the Empire on the same
basis as Canada and the other domin-
ions.
The constitution requires every
member of the Free State parliament
to subscribe faith and allegiance to
the constitution and swear to be faith-
ful to the King in virtue of the com-
mon citizenship of Ireland and Great
Britain's membership in the British
commonwealth of nations.
HOOVER DECLARES COAL
PRICE PLAN COMPLETED
Washington, June 15. - Plans for
maintaining bituminous coal prices
during the strike at the level fixed in
the administration's program of vol-
untary agreements were declared by
Secretary Hoover to have been practi-
cally completed today at a further
conference with operators and deal-
ers.
Secretary Hoover also stated that
operators of anthracite mines had
agreed not to advance the price of
coal now held by them above the
scale in effect during the last week.
WU PEI FU INVITES CHINA'S
PRESIDENT TO CONFERENCE
(By Associated Press)
Peking, June . 15. - General Wu
Pei Fu, China's military genius, who
has turned his energies toward the

re-unification of his country, has in-
vited Dr. Sun Yat Sen, president of
the republic of South China, to come
to Peking and aid the reunion move-
ment. Sanguine observers, however,
do not expect Dr. Sun to accept.

FIRHST DAY Of GRADUATION FETES"
┬░jINCLUDES ADDRESSES BY BURTON,
BATES: LITS HOLD EXERCISES TO1

F

WILL

PRESENT SUGGESTIONS
FOR NEXT YEAR'S
CAMPAIGN

Recommendations concerning the
management of the Michigan League
campaign for the year 1922-23 were
discussed and formulated at the first
meeting of the Almunae council yester-
day afternoon. Mrs. E. D. Pomeroy,
96, president of the council, opened
he meeting with a brief survey of
what has been accomplished during
he last year and a tentative consid-
eration of what must be done next
year.
The council passed a number of res-
olutions which were recommended by
he executive committee and which
will be presented to the general alum-
nae meeting tomorrow. These resolu-
ions cover financial and organization
matters and designate the future pol-.
cy of the Michigan League cam-
paign.
The meeting was resumed after din-
ner, which was served in the'lower
parlors of Barbour gymnasium.
Each delegate present was asked to
nake a report of the work done by her
group during the last year and to give
a suggestion as to plans for next
year.
The general alumnae meeting will be
held at 10 o'clock this morning in
Alumni Memorial hall and will be
ollowed by the annual luncheon at
o'clock at Betsy Barbour house.
Rooms Registered at Union
Alumni back for commencement
week will be able to secure rooms
n homes throughout the city by ap-
plying at the main desk of the
Union. The same method of distribu-
ion which aided so many visitors at
he May Festival will be employed to
ake care of the unusual demand for
accommodations. Available rooms are
isted and a clerk at the desk will
have charge of the distribution.

I
b
i+
n
t,
f
f
n
F
c
F
n
d
t"
'U
s
c
c
e
0
c
s
ti
P
h
x
v
tl
t+
n
d

COMMENCEMtENT GUIDE
A list of commencent activi-
ties together with the time and
place of their occurrence, will
be found in the "What's Going
On" column on page four. This
column will serve as a com-
mencement guide until the dpose
of the period.
SENIOR IRLS PRSNT'
ANNUAL PLY TONIGHT
An all-star cast under the direction
of Prof. John L. Brumm will present
the annual Senior Girls' play, "Po-
inander Walk," at 8 o'clock tonight at
the Whitney theater. The play is an
English comedy in which clever lines
and feature dancing are added attrac-
itons.
The scene is laid in a romantic lit-
tle village by a slow moving river. An
eccentric old man called the "Eye-
Sore" fishes there all day long and in-
cidentally becomes of use to young
Jack Sayle who is trying to marry
Marjolaine despite her mother's and
his father's disapproval.
Mrs. Poskett who has matrimonial
intentions concerning Sir Peter furn-
ishes considerable amusement for she
never misses an opportunity to en-
gage him in conversation.
Dance Stars to Perform
A duet dance by Mildred Henry and
Christine Murkett, two of the stars
from last year's Junior Girls' play,
who take the parts of Marjolaine and
Jack, a horn-pipe danced by a group7
of sailors who are lead by Sir Peter
and Marjolaine, and the muffin men's
chorus all serve to enliven the play.
The difficult male roles carried byt
Sarah Waller as Brooks-Hoskyn, theI
man-about-town, Mildred Chase as thet
blustering Sir Peter, Christine Murk-a
ett as Jack Sayle, and Isabel Kempt
as Lord Otford, are all welf carriedt
out.
Joyce McCurdy as Madame Laches-,
nais and Mildred Henry as Marjolaine
portray characters that are well liked
while Elsie Townsend as the Eye-Sore,
Camilla Heyden as the Rev. Sternroid
and Elizabeth Vickery as Mrs. Poskett
all add to the amusement.
Tickets for the play are on sale atf
Graham's bookstore and at Alumni
Memorial hall and are priced at $1.50,1
$1.00 and 75 cents.
-'
FUTURE CLASSES 1
TO GET TOGETHER
While members of the classes of tenc
or more years ago are holding their
reunions, members-to-be of the classes
of 1934, '37, or '42 will be holding ac
little get-together on the campus.1
Arrangements have been made by thef
Ann Arbor University Girls' club to1
take care of the little tots so that their,
parents may better be able to getf
around and attend all the various
functions and meet all the old friends.
A booth has been stationed in Alum-i
ni Memorial hall where the children1
may- be registered. From there, the1
girls have made plans to take them ontt
on some cool, green spot on the cam-l
pus where they may play under com-
petent supervision. If the weather
should happen to be rainy or cold, ar-
rangements have been made to take
the children across the street to Betsy
Barbour house. Here they may play;

"to their hearts content" in the play.
room which has been furnished with
toys for their benefit.
The admission charged for this will
be given to the Michigan League cam-1
paign fund.

PRELIMINARY ACTIVITIES BEGIN
WITH CLASS CELEBRA.
TIONS
PRESIDENT GIVES TALK
TO S. OF E. GRADUATES
Senior Lits and Engineers Will Give
Program on Campus
Today
Michigan's 77th commencement per-
iod was opened yesterday when the 107
members of the law class met in the
Law building for their class day exer-
cises.
Senior engineers an lits will hold
their class exercises today on the cam-
pus. The lit school program will be
held at 10 o'clock. Class President
Walter B. Rea will deliver the first ad-
dress which will be followed by ora-
tions by Phillips P. Elliott, Josephine
Walter, Margaret E. Tibbals, and
Brewster P. Campbell. The engineer
exercises will be held at the senior
benches in the engineering quad-
rangle. The program will consist of
the president's address, an address by
Dean M. E. Cooley, and orations by
Douglas Dow, E. F. Moore, and George
F. Emery.
The law class program-was given in
the Law building, opening with an ad-
dress by the class president, Owen J.
Watts, who spoke upon the ideal equip-
ment for a law graduate.
Present Memorial
Louis A. Parker presented the class
memorial consisting of a fund of $500
to be used for the purchase of a set of
autobiographies of great jurists and
lawyers. The gift will be added to the
law library,
Prof. E. C. Goddard in accepting the
gift pointed out the importance of
such an addition in the study of the
methods of proceedure used by men
who are admitted to be among the
greatest in the law profession.
Dean Henry M. Bates addressed
the seniors in the closing speech, com-
paring the outlook for the success of
the young lawyer of the past and pres-
ent. He emphasized the importance of
the efforts of the Bar association, in
their recent endeavors to raise the
standards of the law profession, and
warned the graduates not to feel be-
neath the performance of menial work
during the opening period of their
careers.
Dean Bates closed by explaining the
important position that the lawyer oc-
cupies in his community and the wide
field open to him for the performance,
not only of work for pecun'iary gain,
but for the betterment of society.
The exercises closed with the tra-
ditional singing of the "Yellow and
Blue."
Is First S. of E. Senior Class
Seniors in the School of Education
held their first annual class day exer-
cises yesterday afternoon in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall.
John S. Page, president of the class,
opened the program with a word of
welcome to the alumni present. He
then thanked President Marion L.
Burton and Dean A. S. Whitney for
making it possible for the University
at last to have a School of Education.
Charles E. Forsythe presented the
class memorial, which consists of a
fund of $130 to be used to purchase a
bracket lamp, which will be hung in
the entrance of the administration
building of the new school, when
built.
Termed Pioneers
Dean Whitney as the next speaker,
expressed the gratitude of the faculty
of the school for the memorial, and
for the work done by the first graduat-
ing class in "blazing the path" of the

new school. He said that these first
students must be considered as pion-
eers, and that they had been success-
ful, "bearing their difficulties with be-
coming fortitude and dignity."
(ContinA n nPae nFor -

Report Change in Ministers
(By Associated Press)
The Hague, June 15.-Reports

re-

ceived by members of the Russian
conference here say that Marquis Bel-
la Torretta, former foreign minister
of Italy, is likely to be appointed am-
bassador at Washington, replacing
Vittoorio Rolandi Ricci.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan