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June 28, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-06-28

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THE WEATHER
PROBABLY SHOWERS
TODAY

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A6V
:43 a t I

ASSOCIATED
PRESS

DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

11

VOL. XIII. No. 7

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28, 1922

PRICE FIVE Cl

RIL MEN TO CALL
STRIKE JULY 1 IF
WAGECUTISMADE
MANAGERS 0 F PENNSYLVANIA
LINES HAVE MADE TERMS
WITH WORKERS
WALKOUT TO INCLUDE
400,000 SHOP WORKERS
Demand Immediate Confetences With
View of Halting Pay Reduc-
tions
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, June 27.-A strike of the
400,000 railway shopmen of the coun-
try will ,e called for July k unless
the railroads agree to stay the $60,-
000,000 wage cut due the shop workers
on that date and to restore certain
working conditions formally in effect,
it was made known tonight through a
telegram from B. M. Jewell, head of
the shop craft, to the association of
railway executives.
Decision to call a strike came late
today after a lengthy discussion by
the executive committee of the six
shop craft unions, based on the strike
vote of the men thus far tabulated.
Should the railheads arrange an im-
mediate conference agreeing mean-
while to continue present wages, how-
ever, a walkout can be halted, the tel-
egram said.
(By Associated Press)
Philadelbhia, June 27.-Announce-
ment was made late today by the
Pennsylvania railroad that agreements
of reductions of' wages have been
reached between the management and
the elected representatives of 32,500
of its employees. The settlement ef-
fects the maintenance of way depart-
ment embracing 39,400 men, and the
employees of the telegraph and signal
departments, numbering 3,100 men.
The revised scale becomes effective
July 1. "They involve reductions
which have been equally mutually
agreed upon to conform with the low-
er cost of living, the general condi-
tion of employment throughout the
country and the demand of the public
for cheaper transportation, and ex-
press in the interstate commerce com-
mission orders reducing freight rates,"
the announcement stated.
No figures were given out by the
company. Because of its negotiation
in committees of ,its employees, the
Pennsylvania 'was not a party to the
reduction asked by other railroads and
drafted by the United State railroad
labor board,
UNITED STATES AND GERMANY
SIGN CONTRACT FOR ZEPPLIN
(By Associated Press)
Berlin, June 27.-An agreement pro-
viding for the delivery of a Zeppelin
airship to the United States was sign-
ed this afternoon by representatives
of the American and German govern-
ments. The signing followed the con-
clusion some time ago in the United
States of negotiations between the
government at Washington and the
Zeppelin concern which in turn has
,been approved by the German govern-
ment in a separate contract with the
German Airship Construction com-
pany.
Delivery of the airship to the United
States is in place of one of a fleet of

seven destroyed in 1919 as an offset
to Which the United States was award-
ed 3,000,000 gold marks for a new ship.
SUMMER DAILY TRYOUTS
WANTED
Students attending the Sum-
mer session and who wish to try
out for positions on The Summer
Michigan Daily staff should re-
port between 1 and 5 o'clock
in the afternoon at -the Press
building.%
Tryouts for the business de-
partment should see Herold C.
Hunt, business manager; for the
editorial department, James

Wants "Vabe"In
Who's Who Next
To Forestry Prof.
Honors without end are being con-
ferred upon the University by men of
high standing and renown. Secretary
of State Hughescand other famous
men allow us to confer honorary de-
grees upon them without a murmur.
The latest and probably the highest
compliment so far paid to the Uni-
versity and its faculty is a chapter
in a recent book, "Pieces of Hate,"
by Heywood Broun, a New York
newspaper man. In this particular
"piece of hate" the author compares
Professor Roth of the forestry de-
partment with Babe Ruth and raises
the question as to who is the most
qualified to have his name appear,
among the ranks of the great in
"Who's Who." The newspaper writer
looked expectantly among the leaves
of "Who's Who" in an effort to find
the name of the home run king but
the only one which came near to be-
ing Ruth was Roth.
Mr. Broun contends that while Pro-
fessor Roth in his book, "Timber
Physics,'f /probably 'discusses the
most efficient manner in which to
bring about the greatest possible
(Continued on Page Four)
CLEMEITS LIBRARY
NEARS COMPLETION
Excavations and Surveying Mark the
Openings of Operations on
Other Buildings

FRONT VIEW OF THE NEW
SHOPS, WORK ON WHICH IS

ENGINEERING LABORATORIES AND
NOW UNDER WAY.

WORK INTELLECTUALLY AS CITIZENS,

Tour Of City On
Friday Sponsored
ByExchange Club
Opportunity for all strangers on the
campus to become acquainted with the
city of Ann Arbor, its beautiful drives,
its attractive residences, its winding
Huron river, "famous in song and
story," and its wooded suburbs, will
be given on next Friday afternoon.
Through the courtesy of the Exchange
club of this city, cars will be provided
for an hour's automobile tour of the
most interesting points in Ann Ar-
bor and vicinity. Following the drive
the party will visit he University
library, Alumni Memorikl hall, and the
Michigan Union building.
Many newcomers to the University
seldom see important parts of their
college home, and it is to remedy this
lack that the trip has been arranged.
The party will meet on the steps of the
Library, start the ride from the Na-
tural Science building driveway, con-
tinue up Washtenaw avenue through
the adjacent residence sections, re-
turn to Geddes avenue boulevard, trail
down this far-famed roadway, follow
out Main street along the river, wind
out around the hill-top at Barton
(Continued on Page Four)
TOPS 19021 FIGURE

NEW STRUCTURE, GIFT OF BAY
CITY REGENT, READY NOV.

11

With more than 35 men working on
the new Clements' Library building,
the excavations being started on the
Engineering laboratories, and the
surveying being done for the Model
High school, the building program ot
the University is assuming tangible
development.
The stone work on the Clements
Library has been finishel and the
roof will be completed by next
week. By the week of July 3 the
pouring of the concrete floors will be
started. Heating pipe installation
has begun and wiring and plumbing
will soon commence. It is expected
that the building will be) fully com-
pleted by Nov. 1.
Since Thursday excavation for the
new Engineering laboratories has
progressed rapidly. Within two
months it is believed that the entire
foundations will be finished and the
concrete and steel construction of
the building started.' To complete the
entire building, however, will re-
quire aproximately a year and a
half.
Demolition of buildings to make
way for the Model High school is
completed and excavation for the
basement and foundations will be
started as soon as possible.
WESBROOK HOLDS.PLACE
IN TENNISTOURNAMENT
IS ONE OF EIGHT PLAYERS STILL
REMAINING ON SECONIR
-AY
(By Associated Press)
Philadelphia., June 27.-Only eight
players, four easterners, two from the
middle west and two from the Pacific
coast, remained in the singles cham-
pionship of the Intercollegiate Tennis
association as a result of the second
day's play at the Merion Cricket club.
The survivors are Phil Neer and James
Davis,- Leland Standford; Andrew
Morgan, Pennsylvania; Lee Williams,
Yale; Morris Duane, Harvard; C. W.
Sanders, Dartmouth; Walter Wes-
brook, Michigan; and Ray Brown,
Washington University.
Thirty-two teams were entered in
the doubles competition which began
this afternoon. Wesbrook won his
fourth match from W. E. Howe, Jr.,
of Dartmouth, 6-2; A-1.

President . Advises . Students Against
Being Slaves and Servants
in Work
DICKENSON STATES CHINESE
WORK BEST OF CONFERENCE
"If you are to work intellectually,
you must not work as a slave, never
as a servant, but as a free person, as
an artist, as a discoverer, and as a
citizen," said President Marion L.
Burton last night in Hill auditorium
before more than 2,000 summer school
students.
"A student is a slave who is satis-
fied in doing just as little as possible
in order to remain in his class. He,
too, is a slave," continued Dr. Bur-
ton, "who strives after marks." He
further pointed out that intellectual
slaves were those who tried to please
the teacher, to memorize their work,
to master textbooks, or to learn for-
mula by rote. President Burton in-
dicated, too, "I think the supreme evi-
dence of slavery is the passive ac-
ceptance of the printed page as the
truth." Dr. Burton cautioned that the
intellectual worker must not be a
servant, one with a passive mind.,,
Intellectual Workers Free Persons.
Turning to constructive sugges-
tions, he advised the intellectual
worker to be a free person. "It is
far more important that you should
have thinking periods than study
periods." Besides being a thinking
person in class, lectures, and study,
the intellectual worker should be in-
dividual, he said, he must ask him-
self the question at all times, "What
relation does this part of my course
bear to the work T have chosen?" To
be an individual one should have his
mind open for conviction and must
search for the truth in all issues.
"This Summer session will be of val-
ie to you because you have made
some advance in the process of learn,
ing how to learn," continued the
President in outlining the worth of
the Summer session work.
"You must learn to work intellec-
tually as an artist. An artist is a
person," continued President Bur-
ton, "who can suffuse all his work
with the sense of play." In order to
work as an artist," he said, "all you
need to do is to get a motive."
Work as a Discoverer, a Citize
"You must work intellectually as
a discoverer," was the fifth sugges-
tion of President Burton. "Enlarg-
ing on this idea," he said, "you will
have first worked intellectually when
you have found something new. Get
the spirit of glorying in problems.
As a last bit of advice, the Presi-
dent said, "You must do your intel-
lectual work as a citizen." This re-
quires integrity, work that will stand
the test of fire, work that ' is free
from shame, trickery and dishon-
esty, he said. "You must be prepared
to serve as an intellectual being, an
educated and intelligent citizen of
America," concluded President Bur-
ton.
Prof. E. D. Dickenson Speaks.
Preceding President Burton's ad-
dress this evening, Prof. E. D. Dick-
enson of the Law school gave a lec-
ture before a large audience in the
Natural Science auditorium on the
subject, "'Significant Results of the
Wa hington Conference."
"The most significant facts of the
Washington Disarmament Conference
were China's representation in the
'Pnference and the new' resolu-

tions, promises, and assurances that
the Chinese shall be allowed to work
out their own problems in their own
way," said Professor Dickerson.
The four outstanding results of the
Conference were the achievements in
the limitations of armament, the for-
mulation- of new rules in warfare,
the efforts to solve the problems of
the Pacific, and the action for solu-
tion of difficulties of China and the
Far East, according to Professor
Dickenson.
"If he professions made at the be-
ginning of the Conference had at the
time been, capitalized at 100 per
cent, there would have been no long-
er any need for armies and navies,"
declared Professor Dickerson in
speaking of the initial work of the
Conference. He went- on to say, "The
Conference at Washington accom-
plished nothing so far as land wars
are concerned, but under the master-
ful hand of Secretary Hughes, some-
thing substantial was accomplished.",
Capital Ships Programs Abandoned
This significant result said the
speaker was the agreeemnt between
the three great powers, Great Brit-
ain, the United States, and Japan to
abandon their projected programs for
capital ships, to make further reduc-
tion of armament by scrapping some
of the older ships, and by establish-
ing a permanent naval ratio. The
principal of the naval ratio was ap-
proved and with some modifications
was accepted as a fact when the
5:5:3 ratio was agreed upon. Of all
the work in regard to naval arma-
ment, the outstanding fact was that
"The three great powers were able
to come to an agreement about arm-
ament limitation," pointed out Profes-
sor Dickenson. He indicated, on the
"other hand, that the scrapping of
some ships was of no significance be-
cause those discarded were of the
superannuuated types, unable to
function in modern naval warfare.
In regard to further disarmament,
Professor Dickenson said, "The Con-
ference was not able to reach any
agreement about auxiliary craft,"
such as submarines, fast sea boats,
and airplanes.
U.S.AWAITS DETALS
OF TAMICO FFAIR
(By Associated Press)
Washington, June 27.-Seizure of 40
American employees of the Cortez Oil
company at Tampico, Mexico, report-
ed to the state department today, as
security for a ransom of 15,000 pesos,
created a stir in official circles in
Washington. Lacking further in-
formation as to what has happened
behind what is apparently a rigid cen-
sorship at Tampico, however, there
was little to indicate tonight whether
the incident would lead to any change
of attitude here toward the Obregon
government.
At the White House it was said that
relations between United States and
Mexico were not likely to be effected
in any way by the bandit outbreak.
Until it is known that the incident
is not a result of domestic politics
in Mexico conceived by enemies of
the Obregon government to embarass
its relations with the United States,
or until that government has been
proved unequal to affor'd protection

Yesterday's
Yea's

OFFICIALS EXPECT FINALt
COUNT TO BE 2,900 STUDENTS1
Sixty-four more students were en-i
rolled in the Summer session yester-
day that at this time last year, ac-
cording to the final report last nighta
from the office of Edward H..Kraus,l
dean of the Summer session. The1
total enrollment reaches 2,443 against
2,379 for a year ago. The former fig-
ure, however, does not include the
biologcal station enrollment, voca-
tional students in Detroit, the secondI
session of the Engineering camp, or
the second division enrollments in
certain courses in the Medical school,_
according to Dean Kraus.
The following figures taken from
yesterday's report show the compar-j
ative enrollment of the schools andj
colleges and the gain or loss, as
matched w'th last year's totals:
Literary -college.......1081--gain 71
Engineering college ... 413-loss 135
College of Pharmacy.... 21
Law school..........161-gain 17
Medical school ........ 218-loss 57
Graduate school .......386-gain 80
School of Education ...163-gain 125'
Total ............2443
Although yesterday's total barely
exceeded last year's figure, and lacks
more than 300 of the total of last
year's final count, Dean Kraus believes
that with late registrations, and the'
additions of departments, not yet com-
puted, the final figure for the 1922
Summer session will reach between
28 and 29 hundred students.
The course in athletic coaching, a
no-credit course, in the Sohool of Ed-
ucation, showed an enrollment of 62
members yesterday.
REGENTS TO NAME
NEW FACULTY MEN
Appointments fo fll several im-
bortafit posts in the faculty of the Un-
iversity will probably be made today
at the regular meeting of the Board
of Regents.
It is also expected that the Regefnts
will continue from the last meeting.
the discussion of the possibilities of
expanding the present course in nurs-
ing education.
Prof. A- E. White Speaks in Detroit
Outlining "The Field of Library
Service for Our Industrial Establish-
ments," Prof. A. E. White of the chem-
ical engineering department and di-
rector of engineering research, will
deliver an address at 1:30 o'clock to-
day .In the Hotel Statler.

Report Exceeded Last
Total-By Margin of
Sixty-Four

STATE 'OFFICIALS
REVIEW WORK, OF,-
BULDI NG PROGRAM
LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVE
MAKE COMPLETE TOUR
r ~OF CAM-PUS
TN T - [ ||
VISITORS PLEASED WITH
RESULTS OF MEETING
Burton Outlines Universitys Plans
Officals Promise Future
Aid
Michigan was host yesterday t
Thomas Read, lieutenant-governor
the state, F. Lf. Warner, speaker 6
the house, and 20 other members
the state, executive and. legisativ
administration.
Their visit here was in response it
invitations sent out to members o
the waysand means committee of th
house, the finance committee of th
senate, the Universit committee c
bth houses, and the ieutenant-goy
ernor and house speaker. The pu
pose of the invitations was to giv+
the state executives an opportunity c
viewing the campus together wit
University officials In order o re
view the building program and 't
more readily understand the reasoa
for the appropriations made for th
University's new buildings. A fun
to provide for all expenses of the t0
and visit was provided.by the alumn
President Opens' Meeting
President Marion L. Burton, gScr
-tary Smith, Dr. Robbins and Treasu
er Campbell formed the receptio
committee for the visitors. The firs
part of the days program was an it
formal meeting which was opeAed b
the President. He explained to tls
state authorities how muchdthe fUn
versity had accomplished during t
past year and outlined for them twh
he considered the future prospects
the insitution. In hils talk he la
stress on the fact that it was not i
University's intention to set a buld
Ing record, but that it was rathe
seeking to give the student bodies o
the present and future what it ws
their right tosexpect. The progress a
the building program to date was a1
so explained by Presiden Burton.
Following the meehting, the ree:
tion committee conducted the official
in a tour of the entire campus, poin
Ing out thelocation of the new ui
ings and their prominent features.
Officials Pleased b
Representative Culver expresse
himself as well pleased with the r
suits of the visit, declaring that "
was one of the finest things the Unrd
versity has done yet."
Senator Frank H. Yandenboom ahs
commented favorably on the accon
plishments of the meeting and camp
tour.
"The meeting was real get-ti
*gether," he declared, "for the prom
tion of good fellowship. Such even
createbetter feelings and relation
ubetween the legislature and the U
versity:. We will go away from he]
better Informed -about the Unik
sity.
"We can do a lot for Michigan, at
we are ,gong to try to do, It in su
a way as not to burden the over-tae
taxpayer. There are many peop
who have money and will give free
If they are properly handled."
The following state administratio
representatives iwere present at t
meeting yesterday: house ways ai

means committee, C. Hopkins, F.
Wells, 0. W. Bu'chanan, P. Jenson, V
Bryrum; senate, R. Clark, B. C. Da
is, H. Brower, C. A. Sink, E. C. Br
ant,, and F. H. Vandenboom; Unive
sity committee of senate, H. Tenne
A. J. Bolt; University house committ
C. H. Culver, E. B. Strom, A. B. Titu
G. H. Townsend, E. B. Manwariiij
lieutenant-governor, Thomas Rea
house speaker, F. L. Warner; ar
representative, J. E. Warner.
Miss Sherman Leaves for the Summ
Miss Mildred P. Sherman, assista
to the dean of women, left yesterd
for the north where she will be cou
selor at Camp Wanalda, a summ
camp for girls on Torch Lake. Mi
Sherman was graduated from the 1
iversity in 1921.

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