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June 27, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-06-27

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THE WEATHER
SOMEWHAT UNSET-
TLED; WARMER

C S . P

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Lie i6au

til

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XIII. No. 6AANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JUNE 27, 1922 PRICE FIVE CF
e

LECTURE PROGRAM
OPENED YESTERDAY
BY PROF._RUTHYEN
DIRECTOR OF MUSEUM SPEAKS
OF EXPERIENCES IN SOUTH
MERICA
PRES. BURTON SPEAKS IN
AUDITORIUM TONIGHT
President's Subject Not Announced;
Dickinson Speaks This
Afternoon
Prof. A. G. Ruthven of the zoolo-
gy department, director of the zool-
ogy museum, opened the lecture pro-
wgram of the Summer session with an
address before a large audience in
Natural Science auditorium last
night. His subject was "A Naturalist
in South America," his lecture deal-
ing almost entirely with a review of
his own experiences and discoveries.
Prof. E. D. Dickinson of the Law
school will speak at 5 o'clock this
afternoon in Hill auditorium on, "The
Significance of the Washington Con-
ference."
Burton Talks Tonight
President Marion L. Burton will
address the first general assembly of
the Summer session at 8 o'clock to-1
night in Hill auditorium. The subject
for his address has not yet been an-
. Bounced.
"Expeditions into unexplored lands
have one of two purposes, sport or
scientific investigation," said Prof es-
%or Ruthven in the opening part of
his lecture. "When the pirpose of
the expedition is that of scientific re-
search, the explorer seeks to gather
general material to be worked up
later In his laboratory or he strives
to find specimens with particular ap-
plication to a specific problem."
He told- of his discoveries encoun-
tered in the exploration of a field in
northern Colombia, during five trips
to South America. The expeditions
started from the port of Santa Marta
and etended int the esert, the
plain and the perennial snow levels
of the central mountain range of
Colombia.
The peoples of Colombia are a poly-
glot race with Spanish, Indian and
Negro blood combinations. In the
towns the houses are constructed by
the use of mud supported between
poles covered over with thatched
roofs. ,"The birds, vultures, form the
hnly sanitary poMce," said Professor
Ruthven, in speaking of the health
conditions in the villages. 'Really the
only dangers that a traveler in these
regions encounters are those diseases
such as elephantiasis and hook-worm,
according to Professor Ruthven.
Primitive Peoples Savage
At the east end of the range of
mountains th;e same cb4practeristicds
are observed. The primitive peoples
in this region are so virile and sav-
age that the Colombians have never
been able to subdue them. Among the
peculiar aversions of these people are
their fear of being photographed. To
point at a native is an indication that
a charm is being worked over the
savage. The women have an unusual
Ideaof beauty. They cover the ma-
hogany color of their cheeks with
black blotches of clay, while some
decorate the blotches themselves

with red poka dots.
Among the ruins of interest are
those left by the native Indians who
became extinct thousands of years'
ago. Stone roads and terraces are
in evidence in some districts. Cotint-
iing or gaming stones have also been
left as well as examples of pottery.
Ask Ship Liquor Sale Ruling
Washington, June 126.-Secretary
Mellon has formally requested At-
torney General Daugherty for a rul-
ing as to the legality of the sale of
liquors on ship board vessels outside
the three mile limit, it was stated
today at the treasury. It has been
officially held by counsel for the pro-
hibition enforcement movement that
the treasury regulations as now
drawn do not permit such sale, and
that the ruling when made will defi-

UNION UNYIELDING
IN STRIKE POLICY-
Washington, June 26.-Administra-
tion efforts to bring about a settle-
ment of the coal strike were given a
preliminary check here today.
After conferences withyPresident
Harding and Secretary of Labor Dav-
is tonight John L. Lewis, president'
of the United Mine Workers of Am-
erica, announced that the union policy
was unaltered and unyielding in its
insistence that a new wage scale be
set up for the strike ridden districts
by national or semi-national con-
ferences with operators.
"The strike situation is unchanged,"
Mr. Lewis said.
ENROLLMENT NEARS
LAST YEAR"'COUNT
Comparative Figures Expected Today
To Forecast Session's
Total
NO NUMBERS AVAILABLE AS TO
YESTEIRDAY'S REGISTRATION
Registration in the Summer session
continued steadily yesterday, bringing
the total of students enrolled nearer
to last year's figures. No count was
available last night.
The Graduate school reported a tot-
al of 334 students enrolled at the time
the office closed last night.
(Fifty-eight students have already
enrolled in the new course in athletic
coaching and administration in the
School of Education. No credit is giv-
en for work in this branch of the
school in the University, although sev-
eral Western universities do offer
credit towards a degree for similar
courses. For this reason University
officials believe that the work is to
prove popular with the student body
con'sidering the relatively large en-
rollment tlready made..
Comparative figures will be available
today which should indicate accur-,
ately the total enrollment which may
be expected for the Summer session.
NET FIVORITES WIN IN
INTERCO LLEITE I MEET

DEATH MYSTERIES
"in the Heart There is Certainty,"
Says President to Knights
Templar
WE MUST NOT OVERESTIMATE
OR UNDERESTIMATE KNOWLEDGE
Jackson, June 26.-President Mar-
ion L. Burton of the University of
Michigan, spoke upon "Mysteries of
Life and Death," at the annual mem-
orial services of Jackson commands
ery of the Knights Templar, here Sun-
day.
His text was First Corinthians, xiii:
12.-"For now we see through a glass
darkly."
"The Apostle Paul attempted tc
draw a contrast between love and
knowledge and the figure of the mir-
ror is used to show that there is a
dimness in our vision hereand that
all is vague," declared the speaker.
More Sombre Aspect'
"They had no mirrors like ours in
those days and reference probably
was to a bright piece of metal in the
city of the dead. Even the most flip-
pant of you today are reminded of
the darker and more sombre aspects
of life. No more fitting subject could
be chosen than the mysteries of life,
with which all of us are confronted.
Death is the greatest mystery of all.
It seems to be necessary that we de-
termine some practical solution.
"In t&e heart there is certainty. We
do not believe that death ends all.
Faith, hope and love are the things
that abide, and the wise person rec-
ognizes that there is a place when
knowledge fails..
Small. Island of Certainty
"What we know is a smnall islan
around which are oceans unknown.
How little we know of astronomy.
Things taught. when I studied chem-
istry and physics twenty years ago are
not taught now at all. How little we
know of any science. I beg of you not
to be discouraged. We must neither
overestimate nor underestimate what
we know. There is a small island of'
certainty. The Apostle Paul was right
when he said that love never fails."

Navy Crew Establishes Record
In Second Successive Regatta Win

EDITORS TO HOLD
SSTATE6 CONVENTIO
HEENEXT FAI

Poughkeepsie, June 26.-Establish-
ing a new record for the event, the
U. S. Navy eight oared crew for the
second time in successive years won
the annual intercollegiate rowing re-
gatta here this afternoon.
Less than two lengths behind the
Middies came the far western crew
from Washington. The Pacific coast
eight furnished the upset of the race,
defeating Syracuse and Cornell for the
place. The Navy's time was 13 min-
utes 33 3-5 seconds, which is more
than half a minute faster than the
time set by the victorious Navy crew
last year. Washington was caught in
13 mnutes 36 1-5 seconds. At the fin-
ish the navy had a length lead over
Washington which in turn was 3-4 of
a length ahead of Syracuse and Cor-
nell. Syracuse defeated Cornell by
1 foot.
The Cornell Junior varsity crew
captured the first event of the regat-
ta, winning by more than a length
with Columbia second and Syracuse
third. The two Pennsylvania crews
brought up the rear close together.

cuse 10 4-5, Pennsylvania Univer-
sity 10:13 4-5, Pennsylvania A, 105
pounds, 10:29 4-5.
The Cornell time breaks the course
record for the Junior varsity, which
was set by the Cornell 1916 crew when
it finished in 10 minutes and 1-5 sec-
oid.
Syracuse won the Freshman race by
a length. Cornell was second, Co-
lumbia third and Pennsylvania
fourth. The official times were: Sy-
racuse 9:2 1-2, Cornell 9:23 3-5; Sy-
racuse 8 3-5 second slower than the
course record established by Cornell
in 1909.
ENGINEERING DEANS
SEEK BROAD COURSE
S. P. E. E. Annual Meet Also Looks
Toward Latitude in Technical -
Curricula
FIVE YEAR PROFESSIONAL
COURSE FAVORABLY VIEWED
Recommendations were adopted for
the general broadening of engineer-
ing -courses at the annual convention
of the Society for Promotion of Eng-

INIVYRNITY
CONVENE

PRESS CLUB W1
FOl THREE DAY
SESSION -

The official times
6:45 4-5, Columbia

were: Cornell
9:52 4-5, Syra-

HANDLERS OF ORR, '26,
PLACED ON PROBATION

I

I - ---- I

SOPHOMORES IN VAN TYNE CASE ineering Education, and at a confer-

PLANS FOR JOURNALISM
BUILDING ON PROGRAM
Many Prominent Journalists Are In.
--ted to Aattend Three Day
Conference -
Leading Newspapers throughout the
state of Michigan will be represented
at the annual conference of the Uni-
versity Press club, which will be held
in Ann Arbor on Oct. 26, 27 and 28, ac-
cording to - announcement made by
officers of the organization recently.
An extensive program has been pre
pared for the state journalists, among
the chief events of the, convention be-
ing the invitation to the delegates 01
the convention by President Marior
L. Burton to be the guests of the Un-
iversity at a banquet, Friday, Oct. 27
A specilI block of seats will' also be
reserved for the editors for the foot
ball game between Michigan and Illin-
ois on the following day.
National Society to Attend
The newly organized American So.
ciety of Newspaper Editors, which
was formed for the purpose of estab
lishing a code of ethics for American
journalism, will also send representa
tives to the the three day conference
Such men as Caspar S. Yost, of the
St. Louis Democrat; E. S. Beck, man
aging editor of the Chicago Tribune
George E. Miller, managing editor o
the Detroit News, and Frank I. Cobb
editor of the New York World, will b<
include,{ among the represention o
this society.
It is also expected that the conven
tion will take up for consideration the
adoption of plans for a separate build
ing for the department of journalism
In conference fast February witl
President Burton and faculty mei
the announcement states, the Pres
club executive committee initiate(
plans for the -department that wil
show this fall in the more completf
details for a new building, which ar
already sketched and in the hands o
the University architects for develop
ment. One of the best sites availabl
on the campus has been set aside fo
this building, it is declared.

TO BE REPRIMANDED BY
DEANS

l
i
1
V
1
1
j

Punishment for participation in the
hazing of Louis T. Orr has been meted
out to identified membe.rs ofthe" "haz-
ing" parties by recommendation of
the committee of inquiry, which was
appointed by President Marion L. Bur-
ton to investigate the attempts of cer-
tain bodies of students forcibly to
compel adherence to campus tradi-
tions.
The men identified by young Orr,
as having taken part in the episode
from which he emerged with his hair
clipped but otherwise unhurt accord-
ing to the cbmmittee's repart, - are
James K. Miller, '25, Carl L. Davis,
'25, Robert V. Halsey, '25, and Rich-
ard L. Laurence, '25.
Probation for Year
The sentence imposed upon the four
freshmen was probation for one year,
provided that the Student council, the
Student Advisory committee, and the
Underclass Conduct committee gave
assurance at the , opening of college
next fall that they will co-operate and
give active assistance in abolishing
the practice of hazing.
In the case of Josselyn Van Tyne,
Josselyn was unable to recognize any
of the members of the party who ab-
ducted him and imposed the similar
penalty of hair clipping upon him. The
Committee on Inquiry examined all
persons from whom there seemed
reason to expect that useful evidence
might be secured but no clue to the
identity of the guilty persons was ob-

ence of deans of Middle Western eng-
ineering colleges in connection there-
with, last week at Urbana, Ill. Dean
Mortimer E. Cooley of the Colleges of
1ngineering and Architectute, who
left Ann Arbor immediately after
Commencement to attend the meet-
ings, has returned to the city.
Eighteen Deans Attend
The 18 deans. who :attended the
deans' conference unanimously adopt-
ed a resolution suggesting in general
a curriculum in engineering as fol-
lows: A five year course, offering a
bachelor's degree at the completion
of four years' work and an advanced
degree in engineering at the end Wf
the fifth year; the first two years' re-
quirement to be alike for students in
all branches of engineering, includ-
ing chemical engineering.
"The outline is merely a suggestion,
being in no way compulsory, of
course," stated Dean Cooley yester-
day, "but it is significant that it was
unanimously favored by the Middle
Western engineering deans."
The S. P. E. E. created a commit-
tee to confer with a committee of the
National Industrial conference board
and representatives of other bodies
interested in broadening engineering
courses, with a view to securing action
to attain this end. "Through a group
of such--committees, representing pro-
spective employers of engineering stu-
dents, as well as educators, it is hoped
that the trend may be turned," Dean
Cooley said.

LELAND STANFORD
STARS THROUGH
ROUND

BRINGS
FOURTH

Philadelphia, June 26.-Favorites
came through as expected in the sin-
gles of the annual intercollegiate ten-
nis tournament which began today on
the turf courts at the Nerion Cricket
club.
Philip Neer, of Leland Stanford
university, last year's title runner,
advanced to the fourth round by
virtue of a default in the second
round by Alfred Hulmd, of Haver-
ford, and a 6-2, 6-4 victory in the
third round over Lloyd George of the
University of Texas.
Other stars who advanced to the
fourth round were, James Davis, and
Richard Hinckley, Leland Stanford;
Wray Brown, Washington university;
John Howard, Princeton; L. E. Wil-
liams, Yale; W. E. Howe, Jr., Dart-
mouth; Morris Duane, Harvard; and
Charles Granger, University of Texas.
The three members of the Univer-
sity of Chicago, T. T. Gates, A. A.
Stagg, k., and A. E. Frankenstein,
all were eliminated in the second
round.
Play in the doubles championship
will start tomorrow.
Brophy - Spiess Marriage Announced
Announcement is made of the mar-
riage last Saturday of Miss Jeannette
Spiess, 1705 Hill street, to George
Owen Brophy, '22L. Dr. William 0.
Raymond of the English department
performed tie ceremony.
Brophy is a member of Phi Gamma
Delta fraternity and also Phi Delta
Phi. He has been secretary of the
Michigan Union during the past
school year and was the managing ed-
itor of The Daily for the year 1920-

Literary Digest f
Quotes Campbell
The Literary Digest for June 25,
quoting replies to circular let-I
ters which were sent out by that mag-
azine to a large number of colleget
presidents, deans, high school prin-
cipals, school s'uperintendents, edit-J
ors of religious newspapers, and edit-<
ors of college papers, mentions the
opinion of Brewster P. Campbell, '22,1
managing editor of the Michigan Dailyf
for the year 1921-22, first in a series
of quotations of opinions by promin-
ent men.I
The purpose of the survey made by
the Digest was to determine whethert
or not genral public opinion really
believes that "society, especially the
younger part of it, is undergoing at
revolution in morals, in manners, or
in both." ,
Campbell's reply as given in the Di-t
gest is that "it is a well known fact1
that the metropolitan newspapers findt
no college news so tempting as the
scandal news which comes from col-
lege and university communities.
Some universities, it will be noticed,
receive much more such unfavorable
publicity than do others. Investiga-
tion will usually prove that these in-'
stitutions are located near, or in, large;
cities, where papers with a yellow ten-'
dency, are published. The university
is a place where scandal can easily
be started, and the papers play on this
--manufacturing much news with but
little basis."
FEDERAL BOARD STUDENTS
EXPECTED TO CONSULT NURSE
Miss Norma Dack, federal board
nurse, will be in Ann Arbor tomokow,
Thursday and Friday. She will have
an office in Lane hall, and it is expect-
ed that all federal board students will
consult her.

Entertainment Planned
Tentative plans are also being made
by the Michigan chapter of Sigma Del-
ta Chi, national professional journal-
istic fraternity, for a banquet ahd
entertainment for the opening day of
the convention. Some of the big names
in current American life are under
consideration for the program for this
affair.
E. J. Ottaw'ay, publisher of the Port
Huron Times-Herald, is president of
the University Press club. Prof. John
L. Brumm, of the department of journ-
alism, is secretary. Announcement of
further details of the conference will
be made at a later date.
WOMEN'S LE AGUE
PLANS LAWN FETE

tained.
Four Sophonores Named
Four sophomores, who according to
the Committee of Inquiry report, wereE
sent by the Underclass Conduct com-
mittee on the evening of March 28 tof
the Van Tyne home for the purpose ofE
bringing Josselyn before the commit-
tee in session, were recommended for
reprimand by the deans of their re-
spective colleges, because they acted in
a manner offensive to Mrs. Van Tyne,
and committed an act of violence in
attempting to hold the door open when
Josselyn was endeavoring to colse it.
The four men who made up the party,
are George H. Metz, '24, Paul, H. Blum,.
'24, Frederick S. Kratz, '24E, and :
Ward L. Willett, '24E.
Deans to Reprimand Offenders
The letters notifying the freshmen
of their, probation have been mailed
from the office of Dean John R. Effing-
er of the literary college. Dean Effing-
er stated in the letters that he believed
the acts of violence to be the results of
an over zealous enthulasm to uphold
the so-called traditions, and that a sat-
isfactory understanding with the stu-
dents upon their return to college will
result in their co-operation in abolish-
ing hazing in the future.
(Continued on Page Four)

Change Is Slow
It is no wonder that the change is
slow in his opinion, considering the
fact that the conventional engineer-
ing course for years has leaned to
early undergraduate specialization.
Among the most significant acts of
the S. P. E. E., said the dean, was the
establishment within itself of a divis-
ion for administrative officers of
schools and colleges, institutional
members of the society.
"The society has been for 30 years a
pond without an outlet," Dean Cooley
remarked. "Its good work fills vol-
umes. Now all the good things it sug-
gests will be put in the way of adop-
tion due to its immediate connection
wfth college authorities, which it has
not had up to this time. Its efforts
will have an outlet."
HOMOEOPATHS NAME FORMER
PROFESSOR INSTITUTE HEAD

Women enrolled in the Sumi
session and women whose husban
are students here will be the gue
of the Women's League at -a la
party to be given from 4 to 5
o'clock Thursday afternoon on
Martha Cook terrace. The party
being given, so that the women n
have the .opportunity to meet e.
other and the wives of the facu
many of whom will soon be leav
the city for their summer homes
Mrs. William W. Bishop, Mrs. J
R. Effinger, Mrs. Alfred- H. Lloyd,
Mrs. Edward Kraus will be the gue
of honor and will help in the receiv
line.
Arrangements have been made
have special college music as af
ture of the party. The singing
be led by the School of Music
dents and will be accompanied
several violins.
In czase of rain the affair will
held in Barbour gymnasium.

Dr. Claude A. Burrett, dean of the
college of Homoeopathic Medicine of
Ohio State university, has been elect-
ed president of the American Insti-
tute of Homoeopathy. Dr. Burrett
was professor of surgery in the Hom-
oeopathic medical college of the Uni-
versity of Michigan for nine years
before going to Ohio State in 1914.

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