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August 12, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE 'OUR

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, AUGUST 12, 1929

PAGEFOURSATUDAYAUGUT 12 192

..........

CLASS PRESENTS
" THE RIVALS "
(Contiuued from Page One)
have been selected for this has many
difficulties for the amateur which were
not entirely overcome.
No fault could be found with the
staging which was better than is us-
ually seen on the amateur stage. The
many scenes were quickly changed and
the sets although not pretentious,
gained by their simplicity. The cos-
tuming was also to be commended.
On the whole this class in play pro-
duction is to be praised. Only credit
can be given for the picking of a cast
from the ranks of a single class and
the production of such a play. Few
realize the work that is involved in'
preparing productions such as these.
However the publicity committee was
too much on the job; for the audience,
at least many of them, were prepared
for a finished production and when
they only got a good amateur affair
they were disappointed.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.-Adv.
Daily'Wants Aas oring results.-Adv.

WHAT'S GOING ON

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Saturday, August 12
8 a. m.-Excursian No. fourteen--
First National Bank, Detroit, Bob-Lo
Island, and the Detroit river. Leave
at 8 a. in., arrive at First National
Bank 10 a. m. Lunch at noon.
Leave on Bob-Lo boat at 1:30 p. m.
Leave Bob-Lo at 6:30 p. m.
Sunday, August 18
6 p. m.-Social half hour, Presbyter-
ian church.
6:30 p. m-,Harold Van Deman leads
Christian Endeavor, Presbyterian
church. Topic, "The Bible and the
Student."
Obregon Expropriates German Land
El Paso, Texas, Aug. 11.-A decree
signed by President Obregon, of Mexi-
co, expropriating 1,127 acres of valu-
able agricultural land near Dualfal-
ope, 30 miles east of Juarez, is pub-
ished in Diarto Official, just received
in Juarez. The German firm of Ketel-
sen and Degenau, of Chihuahua City,
owned it. It is valued at $200 an acre.
The land will be distributed among
heads of families in Guadaloupe.

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Summer Students-

Secure your supplies at

STUDENTS SUPPLY STORE
1111 South University Avenue

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.Materials for All Colleges

SHOOT THE CHUTES
GROOME'S
BATHING BEACH

ANSWER HARDING
PROPOSAL TODAY
(Continued from Page One)
doors, chief officials of all the rail-
road labor organizations adjourned
tonight until 9 o'clock tomorow
morning declaring themselves still
unready to make response to Hard-
ing's settlement strike offer to the
shopmen, and still unready to make
public the policies which the unions
intend to follow under the circum-
stances.
Warren S. Stone, grand chief of the
engineers' brotherhood and chairman
of the meeting, announced at its
close that both these expressions
would be forthcoming tomorrow. Of-
ficials of the seven unions on strike
will reply to the President for them-
selves, Mr. Stone said, while the re-
mainder of the organizations intended
to join in a declaration of the posi-
tion to the public.
Senority Still the Issue
While the formal announcement of
the conclusions was withheld, the of-
ficers of the striking shopcraft or-
ganizations were unvarying in hold-
ing out the impression that the Pres-
ident's offer, the height of which is
the proposal to leave the seniority
status question to decisions of the
railway labor board, would meet re-
jection. The purpose of the gather-
ing, as they described it, was merely
to consider what the policy of the
other unions would be.
News Of The Day
Belfast, Aug. 11.-Bandits raided
banks in Kingscourt, County Cavan,
getting 2,400 pounds.
Hong Kong, Aug. 11.-Chamber of
Commerce lists of subscriptions for
relief to Swatow typhoon victims total
$42,000.
London, Aug. 11.-Military rule in
Portugal continues, though condi-
tions are improving and work is being
resumed, following a general strike
because of high cost of bread.
London, Aug. 11. - India, Canada
and South Africa have agreed to ratify
the treaties of the Washington confer-
ence, the foreign office announced.
Newfoundland is expected to agree at
the end of the month.
Mexico City, Aug. 11. - A. Bruce
Bielaski, in Cuernayaca to testify re-
garding his recent kidnaping, expects
to leave for the United States with his
wife when he is through in court. He
has been the guest of the American
Charge here since July 6.
Tokio, Aug. 11.-A newspaper report
predicts that Japanese evecuation of
Siberia will be made the occasion of
an effort by the Chita republic to over-
throw the Vladivostok government
Chita troops are reported advancing
southward along the Ussuri railway.
Camp Grant Has $1,000,000 Fire
Rockford, Ill., Aug. 11.-Fire in the
Camp Grant barracks was brought un-
der control early today, after eight
units in the hospital area had been
destroyed and 20 isolated buildings
damaged. Several soldiers were injur-
ed slightly while aiding firemen in
fighting the flames. Four soldiers who
fell through a burning roof escaped
with minor injuries.
Camp authorities declare the fires
undoubtedly were of incendiary origin.
The barracks, erected during the

war, were built and equipped at a cost
of more than $1,000,000.
Boycott Pierce Oil Company
Vera Cruz, Aug. 11-A boycott has
been declared against the Pierce Oil
corporation because the company dis-
missed 75 workmen and failed to give
them three months wagesaas required
by law. Threats are made that any-
one caught working will be killed.
Patronize Daily Advertisers.-Adv.

Library Displays
Rare fird hooks,
The collection of illustrated bird
books on displa'y in the lower corridor
of the University library is from the
library of Mr. A. M. Todd, of Kalama-
zoo. The set to which these books
belong comprises ten titles and 41
volumes. They are sumptuously bound
in tooled green morrocco and illustra-
ted with 2,999 hand-colored plates
made by the famous English ornithol-
ogist, John Gould, from 1831 to the
time of his death in 1881.
Gould was born in 1804, the son of
a gardner at Windsor Castle, and him-
self became a gardener at Ripley Cas-
tle in Yorkshire. Having early ac-
quired a knowledge of wild birds and
great skill as a taxidermist, he was
appointed in the latter capacity to the
newly formed Zoological society of
London in 1827. In 1830 he received a
valuable collection of birdskins from
the Himalayas, then almost a terra in-

WA HR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES

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D,

AUTO LIVERY;
WITH OR WITHOUT DRIVER
416 S. Main. Ph. 583J

I111i'- ffi : _ :g:ama s s
sr a sa os _ mx ss.=aa

MIDSUMMER

READING

All of the New and Up-to-date Fiction at

cognita, and his first volume of plates, British Museum of Natural History in
"A Century of Birds from the Himalaya South Kensington, as is his collection
Mountains," 1831, was made to illus- Australian mammals. His Australian
trate this collection. birds are in the Academy of Natural
Other sets in the collection are Sciences in Philadelphia.
"Birds of Europe," five volumes;
"Birds of Asia," seven volumes; "Birds U.S. MAN TALKS AT
of Great Brtain," five volumes, which,
with three volumes on Australian BERLIN UNIVERSIT Y
mammals, are now on display; and
monographs on partridges, of North (Continued from Page One)
America, and on the family of toucons. Professor Shepherd delivered a sec-
These books are owned by Mr. Todd. ond lecture the same day before the
The remainder of the set he has given
to the University. It consists of five English Seminar, speaking on the
volumes on humming birds, seven on connection of Europe with modern
birds of Australia, five on birds of civilization. During a week's visit in
New Guinea and the Papuan islands, Berlin he 'was the guest of honor at a
and a monograph on trogons. number of social functions,
Gould's work reached its climax in
the production of "The Birds of Great Deny Diplomatic Overstep
Britain." His death cut short his Santiago, Chile, Aug. 11. - Denial
work on "The Birds of New Guinea and that agreements signed in Washington
the Papuan Islands," which was com- for settlement of the Ancon treaty dis-
pleted by R. Bowlder Sharpe, of the pute exceed the formula advanced by
British museum. the American secretary of state is
His remarkable collection of hum- made in a statement issued by Presi-
ming birds is in the possession of the dent Alesandri,

WHITMORE

LAKE

Free Picnic Grove

Lunches at "Van's"

SUNDAY'S CHURCH SERVICES

Too Late Then-
You should have thought of it before
and protected yourself by taking out a
policy of burglarly insurance with us.
We cannot p r ev e n t burglars from
breaking in and stealing your valuables
but we can cover your losses, which
you.cannot recover otherwise.
We make a specialty of this insurance
and can give you the fullest protec-
tion.
BUTLER
Insurance
209 1stNat'lBankBldg. Ph. 401M

}V
White ,Lowl
hoes
Reduced to
$29
120 pair of white low sport and street
oxfords, pumps included. Formerly
priced to $8.50. A splendid buy for
August and September wear.
O'Kane &Hertler
335 SOUTH MAIN STREET
Have Your Shoes Fitted by X-Ray

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FIRST BAPTIST
CHURCH
Huron, below State
Rev. R. Edward Sayles,
Minister
Sunday, August 13, 10:30.
"The Soul's Awakening."
Howard R. Chapman,
Baptist University Minister.
Special Music-Prof. E. N. Bil-
bie will play a violin solo. Solos
will be rendered by Mr. Robert
Dieterle and Miss Helene Almen-
dinger.
The Sunday School at noon,
with Student Guild classaat Guild
House. Final study in Mark's
Gospel. Mr. Chapman..
The Students'aGuild devotional
meeting at 6:30 at Guild House.
ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
SHURON
Cor.. Third and West huron Ste.
(MO. SYNOD)
C. A. BRAUER, Pastor

Opiurrh
Cor. Division and Catherine Sts.
7:35 Holy Communion.
10:30 Morning Prayer and
Sermon.
Rev. C. T. Webb, preacher.
Strangers Always Welcome.

Li

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r--,

Summer

School Students

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Presbyterian Church
iT uron ann UDinto Streets
Z1eonarn R. Marrett ID.DE.
fttnister
Secretary tot niersit2 fenl
Morning Service at 10:30.
Address by Rev. Robert Brown,
of Bad Axe, Mich.
6:oo Social half hour.
6:30 Christian Endeavor meet-
ing; Harold Van Deman, leader.
Topic, "The Bible and the Stu-
dent."

Why Not Travel via
THE ANN ARBOR RAILROAD
UNEXCELLED TRAIN SERVICE
For accommodation of returning Summer School students, following train service,
Ann Arbor to Toledo, will prevail :

9:30 Morning Subject:
' Christ's Parable of the
Hidden Treasure."

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Lv. Ann Arbor-'1:4o A. M. [CT]
Arr. Toledo-.--- 2:10 P. M. [ET]

2:00 P. M.
5:00 P. M.

[CT]
[ET]

4:30 P. M.
7:00 P. M.

[CT]
[ET]

1O 3o Bible School.
ii :30 English Service.
No Evening Services
ALL ARE WELCOME.

For immediate information, below find list of one-way passenger fares from Ann Arbor to
principal destinations via Toledo:

._.._

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I First Methodist

Unitarian Church

State and Huron Sts.

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Church

SIDNEY S. ROBINS, Minister.

A. W. STALKER, Minister.

August 13th, 1922

t,

mo:3o a. m. Dr. H. Addis Leeson
will speak on:
"An Affluent Faith."
12:00m . Sunday School.
6:30 p. m. o Wesleyan Guild.

10:35 a. m.
"A QUESTION LIFE ASKS
OF ALL."
Criticism, including self-criti-
cism, is just the excavation for a
building, just a hole in the ground.
Last Sunday before vacation.

YOU WILL FIND THE
Farmers
and Mechanics Bank
A pleasant, conven-
ient and SAFE place
to transact your
business.
TWO OFFICES:
101-105 South Main St.
330 South State St.
Nickels' Arcade
Member of the Federal Reserve

NORTH-BOUND TRAINS
North-bound trains Nos. 5f and 53 leave Ann Arbor 8:xo A. M. [CT] and 4:41 P. M. [CT],
connecting with Grand Trunk, Michigan Central, Pere Marquette and G. R. & I. for all principal
destinations in lower and upper Peninsula of Michigan.
Try Our "Across Lake Route"
in traveling to destinations in Wisconsin and Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Four modern steel
passenger ships, splendidly equipped, in service year round between ports of Frankfort, Michigan,
and Manistique, Michigan, Menominee, Michigan, Kewaunee, Wisconsin, Manitowoc, Wisconsin.
H. A. MILLI, Comm'l Agent,,Ann Arbor, Michigan

Youngstown, Ohio........................... $8 53
Akron, Ohio.................................. 7 47
Toledo, Ohio .................................Iz 64
Marion, Ohio............................... 5o8
Cleveland, Ohio .............................. 6 z5
Columbus, Ohio ................. ............ 6 72
Canton, Ohio. .............................. 7 47
Cincinnati, Ohio.............................. 9 6o
Dayton, Ohio .............................. 7 64
Springfield, Ohio............................. 7 14

Baltimore, Md............. ...........$21 77
Washington, D. C.......................... 21 77
IErie, Pa.... .................... .... 957
Philadelphia, Pa............................. 23 45
Pittsburgh, Pa....... ................io 87
Chicago, Ill...'... .10 72
St. Louis, Mo........................ .16,%
Louisville, Ky.........................13 51
Indianapolis, Ind..........................o o4
South Bend, Ind.........................762

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