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August 11, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-11

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PAGE FOUR

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, AUGUST '11, 1922

PAGE FOUR FRIDAY, AUGUST 1.1, 1922
D 'scouraged British Students

Discouraged British Students
To Seek Utopia On Lonely Isle

(By Associated Press)
London, Aug. 10.-Discouraged at
the outlook in this country, dissatisfied
with the after-war Britain, but actu-
ated mainly by a love of adventure,
about a dozen engineering students
of Loughborough college are setting
out on Sept. 1 for an uninhabited Pac-
Ifi island belonging to Ecuador,
Most of them are ex-officers. Among
them is an author, D. L. David, who
wrote "Ya Brot." He expects to find
in the new settlement work for his
pen as well as his hands. A 90-ton

vessel is being made ready for the
expedition.
The chief means of existence they
hope to find by utilizing the resources
of the island itself; the development
of fruit-growing and the breeding of
cattle.
All hands will be required to work,
although climatic conditions, it has
been ascertained, are ideal and all
they will need for food can be obtain-
ed without working, if they are con-
tent just to "loaf and invite their
souls."

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Their destined home, the adventur-
ers say, is about 500 miles from the
Panama Canal.
EDUCTORS TO REFORM
"LilRED SHOOL HOUSE"
(By Associated Press)
New York, Aug. 10.-Add to the list
of idols smashed to smithereens by
the efficiency of modern science that
quaint institution of American rural
life-the "little red schoolhouse"-now
denounced by educational experts of
Columbia university as "a danger to
national progress."
Experiments conducted for the past
year in a tiny school in Warren coun-
ty, N. J., have proved to Dr. Fannie
Dunn, of Teachers' college, Columbia,
that the problems attending the evis
of the "cult of the little red school-
house," as Dr. Dunn calls it, can be
solved by the same methods that have
brought progress in teaching the young
of the cities "how to shoot."
Forty-four pupils attended the typic-
al schoolhouse in Warren county,
which was seven miles from a trunk
line railroad, two miles form a postof-
fice, and out in the open country. A
single teacher was forced to instruct
eight grades. There are still 200,000
similar schools in the United States
just 160,000 too many, Columbia edu-
cators says. They hope to cut the
number to 40,000. Changes that seem
appallingly revolutionary to Ameri-
cans who remember the rigid, plaster-
cast demeanor that was exacted of
every country schoolboy who was fore-
ed to attend the little red schoolhouse
of years ago, are recommended for
those one-teacher institutions that will
remain. Unrestricted movement about
the room, the installation of pupil
helper for the teachers, a more "club-
by" spirit among the youngsters, and
the application of the "automat" idea
in teaching the children to gain a large
part of the education themselves from
the school library, are part of the new
plan evolved from the Warren coun-
ty test.
J. E. BEAL APPOINTED AS THE
NEW 'COUNTY FUEL HEAD
(Continued from Page One)
tors, and no date has yet been set for
the resumption of their negotiations,
which were broken off in June.
Mines Stand Idle
Staunton, Ind., Aug. 10. - With. the
beginning today of the ninth day of
occupation of the Staunton coal dis-
trict there had not been a lump of
coal mined at the shafts and officials
apparently are casting about for skill-
ed labor with which to begin diggin
coal.aThere has been little response
to Governor MCray's call for volun-
teers among striking miners to man
the shafts and element of labor ship-
ped in from outside points apparent-
ly has proven unsatisfactory to the
mine operators.
Governor McCray in a statement is-
sued in Indianapolis yesterday said
convict labor would be used to oner
ate the mines only as a last resort,
and the statement brought forth the
comment from several different quar-
ters "that the last resort is about
due."
EXPECT ROADS TO AGREE TO
HARDING'S SETTLEMENT PLAN
(Continued from Page One)
although B. M. Jewell, chairman of
the striking group, said that the meet-
ing could hardly reach a decision be-

fore Saturday.
He repudiated as entirely unfounded
suggestions that the shopcraft union
expected sympathetic strikes from the
other transportation organisations, but
left the impression that sympathetic
action was expected.
FIRST OF PLAY PRODUCTION
DRAMAS GIVEN LAST NIGHT
(Continued from Page One)
her share of the performance as well
as Diehl, and although her part was
a sad one, still it is known that Rus-
sians sometimes smile, and are not
cold in their love-making.
It must not be forgotten, however,
that this was an amateur production,
and that even effort has its reward.
"The Melting Pot" is a play of the
heart and the soul, of the suffering of
a nation-and interpreting it is an
achievement in which better and more
experienced actors have failed.
Daily Wants Ads bring results.-Adv.

WAHR'S

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORES

i _ _ ___ _ _

. _ .

AN OPPORTUNITY
CHANCE is seldom offered
for you to realize as much
on your money as we are
offering at this time.
N an effort to make room for
the Fall popular numbers,
we are making a reduction
in the prices of almost our com-
plete popular stock.
4TARTING this morning and
continuing through Satur-
day, Aug. 12th, the 40-cent
numbers will sell at 30 cents
each, 4 copies for $1, and the
30-cent numbers at 25 cents, or
5 for $1.
MFrsi. M3. 11, it
Summer School Students
Why Not Travel via
THE ANN ARBOR RAILROAD
UNEXCELLED TRAIN SERVICE
For accommodation of returning Summer School students, following train service,
Ann Arbor to Toledo, will prevail :

MIDSUMMER

READING

Bulletin
Washington, D. C., August 10.-
Use of the emergency power
of the interstate commerce com-
mission to bring into line coal op-
erators who are failing to co-
operate with the federal fuel or-
ganizations in the control of prices
was under consideration today by
the central coal administration.
Daily Wants Ads bring results.-Add,

All of the New and Up-to-date Fiction at

WHAT'S GOING ON
Friday, August 11
5 p. m.-History and Citizenship; a
New Examination of an Old Subject.
Prof. W. A. Frayer.
8 p. m.-Richard Brinsley Sheridan's
"The Rivals." The class in Play Pro-
duction under the direction of Prof.
R. D. T. Hollister. Admission will
be charged. (Auditorium of Univer-

sity hall).
9 p. m.-Dance in Union
Paul Wilson's orchestra.

ball room.

Saturday, August 12
8 a. m.-Excursian No. fourteen-
First National Bank, Detroit, Bob-Lo
Island, and the Detroit river. Leave
at 8 a. m., arrive at First National
Bank 10 a. m. Lunch at noon.
Leave on Bob-Lo boat at 1:30 p. m.
Leave Bob-Lo at 6:30 p. m.
Daily Wants Ads bring results.-Ady.

Bonus-bona--bonum!
IMAGINE the agony of the old oaken
soldiers of Rome who were compelled
to shave soapless before meeting the enemy.
Not so good!
Today-bonus or not-you college vet-
erans will not decline a good thing. Will-
iams' Shaving Cream does away with all tense
expressions and puts you in the right mood.
That rich white lather that stays rich
and thick, softens whisker resistance and
reduces razor action to
a pleasant painless purr.
Williams' Shaving Soaps
have been a tradition
among college men for--
generations.
,.Shaving Cream

Lv. Ann ArboriI1:4o A. M.
Arr. Toledo---.--2:10 P. M.

[CT]
[ET]

2:00 P. M.
'5:oo P. M.J

[CT]
[ET]

4:30 P. M.
7:00 P. M.

[CT]
[ET]

For immediate information, below find list of one-way passenger fares from Ann Arbor to
principal destinations via Toledo:

Youngstown, Ohio.......................... $8 53
Akron, Ohio.-........................ 7 47
Toledo, Ohio:................................ 164
Marion, Ohio.............................5 o8
Cleveland, Ohio............................ 6 15
Columbus, Ohio...........................6 72
Canton, Ohio .............................. 7 47
Cincinnati, Ohio...........:.................. 9 6o
Dayton, Ohio .............................7 64
Springfield, Ohio......................... 7 14

Baltimore, Md...............................$21
Washington, D..C.................... 21
Rrie, Pa . .............................9g
Philadelphia, Pa...I. ........... .........23
Pittsburgh, Pa .......................... 1
Chicago, Ill...o
St. LOWiS, MO............ .. .... ....... 1
Louisville, Ky..... ..................13,
Indianapolis, Ind...................... Io
South Bend, Ind......................... 7

77
77
57
45
87
7'
95
52
0I
64

NORTH-BOUND TRAINS
North-bound trains Nos. 5f and 53 leave Ann Arbor 8:io A. M. [CT] and 4:41 P. M. [CT],
connecting with Grand Trunk, Michigan Central, Pere Marquette and G. R. & I. for all principal
destinations in lower and upper Peninsula of Michigan.
Try Our "Across Lake Route"
in traveling to destinations in Wisconsin and Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Four modern steel
passenger ships, splendidly equipped, in seivice year round between ports of Frankfort, Michigan,
and Manistique, Michigan, Menominee, Michigan, Kewaunee, Wisconsin, Manitowoc, Wisconsin.
H. A. MILLS, Comtn'1Agent, Ann Arbor. Michigan

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