100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

August 11, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Ih p

'ummirr

THE WEATHER
FAIR AND WARMER
TODAY

Sir

oatt

ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

VOL. XIII. No. 48 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, AUGUST 11, 1922 PRICE FIVE CENTS

ROADS

FAVORING

HARDING

PLAN

BELIEVE ROOMING
SITUATION WAILL
REMAIN NORMAL

LIBRARY NOTICE
Students having in their pos-
session books drawn from the
University Library are notified
that all such books are due Mon-
day, Aug. 14, on account of the
impending close of summer
school.
WM. W. BISHOP,
Librarian.

PRICES EXPECTED TO
LEVEL WITH THOSE
LAST YEAR

BE
OF

ON

UNIVERSITY I ISTING
WILL GO ON AS USUAL
Misunderstandings May be Taken to
Dean of Students for Settle-
ment
Rooms for the next University ses-
sion are being, and will, continue to
be, listed in the office of the Dean of
Students, as has been customary in the
past. Canvass of the city for rooms
will be made as usual under the gen-
eral direction of the Michigan Union.
Prices are expected to be about the
same as last year, and the rooming
house situation, as far as can be seen
at present, will not be acute.
Will Not Dictate Lease Period
According to a statement issued by
Dr. Wahr, assistant to the Dean of
Students, "students are expected to
keep all agreements, verbal or writ-
ten, made at the time of the renting of
the rooms. The University does not
attempt to dictate the length of period
for which the landlord may rent or
the student may take a room."
From past experience it is thought
that the fairest arrangement for all
concerned is for the student to engage
his room by the semester, and for him
to use the lodging house agreement
supplied by the office of the Deanof
Students. Any difficulty arising be-
tween the student and landlord when
this agreement is used may be brought
to the Dean of Students or his repre-
sentative for settlement, for provision
for this is made in the University
agreement.
Should Consider Contracts Carefully
Both landlords and students are ad-
vised to consider very carefully the
terms of any agreement made, whether
verbal or written, before making or
signing an agreement..
It has been found, according to Dr.
Wahr, that most of the difficulties
which have arisen in the pastbbetween
landlords and students have been due
to indifference, lack of thought, and
consequent mislunderstanding about
the terms under which the rooms
were rented.1
PRO DAVISON ACPTS
POSITION IN BROOKLYN
IS SECOND OF ENGINEERING FAC-
ULTY TO LEAVE THIS
YEAR
Prof. Ward F. Davidson, who has
been a member of the faculty of the
department, of electrical engineering
since 1916, has accepted a position with
the Brooklyn Edison company, and
will leave Ann Arbor with his family
at the close of the Summer session. He
has applied for a year's leave of ab-
sence, but if the University is unable
to grant this, he will resign his posi-
tion here.
Professor Davidson is the second
faculty member of the electrical eng-
ineering department to leave the Uni-
versity within a short time. Prof.
John C. Parker, head of the college
for many years resigned this spring to'
take charge of the engineering work
of the Brooklyn Edison company.
Professor Davidson's successor has
not yet been appointed.
German Consuls in Conference
Berlin, Aug. 10.-American consularj
officers from all parts of Germany are
holding a three-day conference here.

DIFFICULT ROLES IN
"MELTING POT" MAKE
PEET N UC (By Lee O'Ja3 ii)

After much heralding and proclaim-
ing of trumpets, the class in play
production last night presented Zang
will's masterpiece, "The Melting Pot,"
in University hall auditorium, before
a fairly large audience.
The performance on the whole was
fair, considering the fact that the
Toles were difficult, but there was
lacking throughout the play that
which makes the actor an artist,
which makes the painter a master--
that thing which is called interpreta-
tion. With but a few exceptions, the
players were too forced, too stiff, al-
though to their credit it must be
said that they tried, and tried hard.
Awkwardness more than anything else
detracted from the general interest of
the production.
Harold B. Lipsitz, in the role of
David Quizano, held his part in com-
mendable manner. His lies were the
most difficult of all, and the most im-
portant, too, but there were few slips
in his presentation.
Harry G. Miller, as the German mu-
sic-master, and Helen Elliott, as Kath-
leen the maid, if for nothing else, de-
serve praise for saving the play from
becoming too heavy. There was no
affectedness in their characterizations,
no stumbling or hesitating for artifi-
cial effect-they were themselves.
Victor F. Diehl was too sombre in
his role, failing to take advantage of
the opportunities which his part af-
forde. His gestures and motions were
superfluous, although his acting on
the whole was not half bad. Isabelle
E. Ronan as Vera Revendalucarried
(Continued on Page Four)
SIX REPORTED DEAD S
CRUISGOES AGRN
BRITISH GOVERNMENT VESSEL
ON ROCKS OFF BELLE
ISLE STRAITS
Halifax, N. S., Aug. 10. - Six to
11 men may have perished when the
British cruiser Raleigh went ashore
yesterday in the Straits of Belle Isle,
it was indicated today in unofficial
dispatches received here.
The first report of the death toll
came in a message from the Canadian
government steamer Aranmore, 280
miles from the scene. The Aranmore
said 6 men lost their lives when wa-
ter rushed into the Raleigh's engine
and boiler rooms after she struck the
rocks.
While no/ official communications
have been received from the spot
where the cruiser was wrecked Com-
mander Jermain of the Halifax dock
yards today intercepted messages in-
dicating 11 of the crew were missing.
The remainder of the 800 officers and
men were said to have reached her.
Washington, Aug. 10.-The aid of
the American navy was today placed
at the disposal of Admiral Sir Wil-
liamn Pakenham, commander of the
British North Atlantic squadron,
whose flagship is aground near St.
Johns, N. S.

BEAL A*PPOINTED
WASHTENAW FUEL1
ADMINISTRATOR
MIN IE HEAD PREDICTS END OF
THE STRIKE IN
WEEK,
SERVED AS COUNTY
WARTIME FUEL HEAD
G ;oesbeck Awaits Reply from S Bond
Telegram to Central Fuel Head;
First Answer Negative
(By Associated Press)
Lansing, Aug- 10.-Governor Groes-
beck today awaited results from his
2econd telegram to the Interstate
Commerce commission, urging that
the Louisville & Nashville railroad be
ordered to permit the Detroit, Tole-
do & Ironton to use its system to
tap the coal fields in its territory and
transport fuel to Michigan.
Frown on State Plan
The governor received a reply to his
first telegram to the commission
Wednesday night. It was signed by
Commissioner Clyde B. Atchison and
stated that "present information does
not indicate that the proposals to run
D., T. & I. trains over the L. & N.
would afford the relief sought, because
of countervailing disadvantages."
In the meantime the governor con-
tinued to hold further state action to-
ward securing coal supplies in abey.
ance, pending the conclusion of the
Cleveland conference of operators
and miners.
Beal Is Named

The state fuel administration today
naned the following additional sub-
administrators:
Mt. Clemens; Delta, P. P. Bourke, Es-
Huron; Gladwin, Charles B. Erwin.
- averton; Missauckee, R. M. Bielby,
Lake City; Iosco,- Burley Wilson, Ta-
was City; Washtenaw, J. E. Beal, Ann
Arbor; Macomb, William N. Streit,
Mt. Cemens; Delta, P. P. Bourke, Es-
canaba; St. Joseph, Charles L. Spence.
Sturgis; Grand Traverse, W. J. Hobbs,
Traverse City; Crawford, R. D. Bai-
ley, Grayling.
Beal Not Officially Notified
C. E. Beal stated last night that he
had received no official notice of his
appointment, but expected that the
appointment would be accompanied
with information and data concerning
the administration of his office.
Mr. Beal, who is a member of the
Board of Regents of the University,
acted as fuel administrator for Wash-
tenaw county during the war period,
assuming his duties prior to the
Michigan coal tie-up, which resulted
in Ann Arbor being deprived of fuel
for seven weeks.
Cleveland, Aug. 10. - The policy
committee of the United Mine Work-
ers of America today voted to pro-
ceed with the negotiation of a wage
scale agreement with the operators o'
Ohio, western Pennsylvania, Indiana
and Illinois, who are here for the
joint conference, called with the view
of breaikng the soft coal strike.
Announcing the committee's deci-
sion, President John L. Lewis of the
miners said:
Hope for End in Week
"I confidently predict that when a
scale is made here that 75 per cent
of all the bituminous workers now on
strike will sign the scale and return
to work in a week."
Settlement of the strike in the an-
thracite regions which also have been
shut down since April 1, when the
miners walked out, would "naturally
follow" the resumption of work in the
soft coal industry, Mr. Lewis said.
his settlement, however, would be
reached through negotiations with
the miners and the anthracite opera-
(Continued on Page Four)

I

ENGINEERS PLAN
NATIONAL MUSEUM
(By Associated Press)
New York, Aug. 10.-Plans for the
establishment of a national engineer-
ing museum, the first of the kind in
the United States, were announced re-
cently by the American Society of Me-
chanical Engineers. The collection,
which will be a part of the Smithson-
ian Institution's National Museum at
Washington, will be started with var-
ious models, drawings, diplomas, and
medals that once belonged Lo Capt.
John Ericcson and Cprnelius. H. De-
Lamater, builders of the Monitor, and
the pioneer engineers of America, who
were associated 50 years in the De-
Lamater Iron Works, the largest insti-
tution of that kind in the United States
half a century ago.
All the engineering societies in Am-
erica have accepted the Mechanical
Engineering Society's invitation to
participate in assembling material for
the museum.
EMPLOYER SHO U I
KNOW PSYCHOLOGY
Professor Ymakum Believes Business
Man Should Have Knowledge
of Science
M1ANA6GE tS HAVE OWN NOTIONS
ON METHODS OF HIRING MEN
Speaking of the "Psychologist in
Industry," yesterday in Natural Sci-
ence auditorium, Prof. C. S. Yoakum.
of the Carnegie Institute of Techno-
logy, pointed out some of the difficul-
ties encountered by workers in this
field, the problems that had to be stud-
ied, and the work already accomplish-
ed. "Testing," declared the speaker,
"does not by any means include the
whole field of the psychologist in in-
dustry." Professor Yoakum outlined
the sociological influences in industry,
that of conformity inside the factory
walls and those of the labor unions ex-
erting external pressure.
"Business is nothing more than a
series of activities stirred up by hu-
man needs," defined the lecturer. Pro-
fessor Yoakum emphasized the fact
that much study had been made of
production in industry but relatively
little has been done on distribution
and relations.
Managers Differ with Experts
In treating the competition which
the psychologist in industry has to
meet, the lecturer showed that the
principal difficulty was encountered in
those men in the organization who had
grown up to their present high posi-
tions while some trouble was found
where outside sexperts in mainten-
ance, character analysis, and selection
of men. The first class have princip-
ally concerned themselves with the ad-
ministration and processes of their
concerns, but these men in selecting
employees laid great stress on "hunch-
es," questions, looking directly in the
eyes of applicants, or browbeating.
The other people who were obstacles
in the psychologist's study are the
outside specialists, those who look to
external qualities or acquired charact-
eristics, such as facial muscles, atti-
tudes, postures, and ease of move-
ments. Still others are of the spirit
ualist and claravoyant types who go
into trances to analyse the particular
problem presented.
Employers Should Know Psychology
In touching on what the captains of

industry expect of the psychologists,
Professor Yoakum said they need
methods of selection, some psychologi-
cal proceedure by which they can
know that they are getting men who
approach those they already employ,
who are superior. They also desire
to get a better group and social
psychology to apply to advertising and
selling problems. Fatigue, light, and
abnormal employees demand also the
consideration of the psychologist; ac-

cording to Professor Yoakum. The
speaker emphasized the fact that
sound knowledge of psychology and
its relation to the selection of men
should be put into the hiands of the
business men of our country as much
as into those of our students in schools
and universities.
Professor Yoakum went on to demon-
strate the correlation betwen human
characteristics and intelligence tests,
showing one instance in which those
of relatively high intelligence remain-
ed the longest in a particular com-
pany, while those of lower and much
higher mentality had long periods of
service. In other examinations off
engineering groups tests were able
to prophesy those who were to under-
take design work and who who would
be salesmen-engineers.
COACHES OF 18 STATES
ATTENDYOST'S SCHOOL
MENTOR SATISFIED THAT EXPER-
IMENT HAS PROVED SUC-
CESS
Enrollment figures for the summer
school for athletic coaching and ad-
ministration this year show that 91
registered for courses, including more
than 80 preparatory and high school
coaches and one woman, Agnes M.
Campbell, who has been taking base-
ball at Harvard. This is the first year
that courses have been offered in a
coaching school, and according to
Coach Fielding H. Yost, the experi-
ment has proved successful in every
way. Nineteen states in all parts of

SENTIMENT TURNING AGAINST
"FIGHT TO FINISH", CHALLENGE;
ACCEPTANCE EXPECTED' ODY

HOOPER WILL ATTEMPT TO CON.
CILIATE EXECUTIVES AND
EMPLOYEEES
BOARD TO DEAL WITH
SENIORITY DISPUTE
Strike Leaders Obdurate; Will Not
Make Statement Until After
Meeting "
(By Associated Press)
Washington, Aug. 10.-Western and
southern transportation representa-
tives began to arrive here today for
the session tomorrow of the Associa-
tion of Railroad Executives to pass on
President Harding's new rail peace
plan. Indications were that-the "sur-
render" policy voiced by L. S. Loree,
chairman of the eastern conference,
was fast gaining momentum.
Make Concerted- Effort
Concerted efforts of the eastern men
to sanction their position was fore-
seen in several informal conferences
held this afternoon and tonight at
which newly arisen officials: were
guests of local executives.
The subterranean drifting of senti-
ments against acceptance of President
Harding's proposal which until today
seemed to be confined to a few of the
more belligerent eastern roads, now
appears to dominate among the exec-
utives here for the conference. Their
attitude is that the strike is already
lost to the shop craftsmen and that,
with the acceptance of the strike lead-
ers' challenge to a "fight to the finish,"
the shop forces soon will be recruited
to normal strength and the power of
the union disintegrated.
South and West Unfavorable
Southern and western roads, how-
ever, are not faring so well, it is
frankly admitted, because most of
their shops are situated far from the
big labor centers where non-union
forces are most easily recruited to re-
place the strikers.
Their representatives came here
prepared to vote for aceptance of Mr.
Harding's plan, it was understood.
Washington, Aug. 10.-Nearly all
the officials of the railroad unions who
will participate in tomorrow's con-
ference over President Harding's final
proposal of a basis for settling the
strike, were in Washington tonight
and had completed a survey of the
situation as presented to them by
leaders of the seven shopcraft organ-
izations actually on strike. The only
exception was the head of the "Four
Brotherhood" of train service men who
are expected to be on hand by 10
o'clock when the 'general meeting is
scheduled to begin.
Hooper to Speak
Ben W. Hooper, chairman of the
railway labor board, also arrived in
Washington today having come on a
train which carried a large number of
railroad presidents to New York. He
called upon President Harding and
later stopped and talked with union
spokesmen.
It was understood that Mr. Hooer's
efforts would be to persuade both the
rail executives and the union leaders
to accept the President's offer, which
suggested that the strike be called off,
the men be taken back in service by
the railroads and the. question of the
seniority status be dealt with by the
board.
Expect Acceptance
'The White House was the source of
Information during the day that the
executives could be expected to accept
the President's solution, after thir
meeting at New York tomorrow. Strike
leaders, however, were apparently un-

changed in their attitude of opposition,
(Continued on Page Four)

FIELDING H. YOST, DIRECTOR OF
I ternational Athletics, who has
completed a successful experiment
in establishing a school for coaches
in the University.
the country are represented in the en-
rollment and one student comes from
Essex. Ontario.
The courses given this summer have
been arranged especially for instruc-
tors already engaged in teaching or
coaching during the regular school
year and for others who wish to sup-
plement the preparation they may
have received in colleges and profes-
sional schools. The more important
problems of coaching have been taken.
up, and instruction in both theory and
practice in football, basketball, base-
ball, track and filed has been given.
Supervision of playground and Boy
Scout activities, organization and ad-
ministration of athletics, and methods
of teaching gymnasics are some of
the other courses which have been
pursued this summer.
Hillsdale Students Hold Picnic
Twenty-five former students and fac-
ulty, members of Hillsdale college, who
are students in the University Summer
session, held a picnic supper last eve-
ning at the fire place on the Geddes
Heights boulevard.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan