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August 04, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-04

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THE WEATHER

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O'uimrr

GENERALLY FAIR
TODAY

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIRE
SERVICE

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VOL. XIII. No. 37
OUTDOOR PL.AYERS
PRESENT "TANG
}OF THE__SHREW"
NATURAL SETTING. EFFECTIVE
RAIN NECESSIATES MOVE
TO AUDITORIUM
MC ENTEE COMPANY TO
OFFER 3 MORE PLAYS
Elsie Kea-ns, Harry Neville, P. J
Kelly Take Cast Parts in Shake-
sp-e Production
(yB Portia Goulder)
On a stage framed with overhang
Ing trees and banked with boughs
of cedar, Frank McEntee and his
company presented "The Taming o
the Shrew" last night in the out
ef-door theater built on the campus
The natural setting, producing an
effect that the best stage scenery can
mly approximate, together with the
iablilty of the company and the rol-
licking conedy of the play made ,the
event of unusual moment.
The theater was filled before 8
o'clock and there was a quiet appre-
ciation of the beauty of the scene as
dwell as of the acting going on. Even
tthe thunder as it grew louder and
the thickening clouds that hid the
qmoon did not distract any attention
- from the action. It was not until
'Prof. Morris P. Tilley, who has been
instruinental in bringing the Shake-
speare Playhouse here, announced
that the play would have to be con-
inued in University Hall that there
was the slightest distraction from
the play.
Frank McEntee, who played the
part of Petruchio, was an actor with
the original Ben Greet players. He
made the violent husband as real as
though he were a character from
modern life, without losing any humor
of the situations in which he was
placed.
Elsie Herndon Kearns portrayed as
well the self-willed, unmanageable
girl and the mild mannered obedient
wife. Miss Kearns has appeared in
Ann Arbor before and has played in
Walter Hampden's company in addi-
tion to having been head of her own
company for several years.
Harry Neville kept the audience
laughing even when he was receiving
a beating from his master or teasing
his mistress. Mr. Neville is an Aus-
tralian actor who has toured in all
parts of the world and has had ex-
perience in both Shakespearean and
moderh plays.
P. J. Kelly, who is known for the
parts he has taken in Irish Renais-
sance plays, was the rich old man,
(Continued on Page Four)
KNOW YOUR UNITESITY
"Michigenda" was the name of the
first Michigan Union opera, which was
given in 1908. Since that time Mich-
igan men, have' given this show an-
nually, and have enlarged it each
year. Last season the opera played in
the large cities of the middle west,
Chicago, Toledo, Cleveland, Cincin-
nati, Indianapolis, and other places,
more than one hundred men being on
tour with the show. The opera was
given during the Christmas vacation

last year, and this year's schedule
calls for playing at the same season.
The itinerary for the coming year will
include Pittsburg and Louisville in ad-
dition to the other cities made last
year. The opera is given as one of the
activities of the Union. E. Mortimer
Shuter, who formerly worked with
Florenz Ziegfeld, Fred Stone and oth-
er producers, is the director of the
opera.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, AUGUST 4, 1922

PRICE FIVE CENTS

PRICE FIVE CENTS

PHONES TO PAUSE
IN"BELL'S MEMORY
New York, Aug. 3.-Telephone serv
ice throughout the United States ad
'Canada will stop for one minute ass
tribute to Alexander Graham Bell a
the hour when the inventor is burie
tomorrow, the American Telephone &
Telegraph company announced today
; The exact hour has not been determ
ined.
STUDENTS TO INSPECT
S TTE PEN ITENTIAR
CONSUMERS' POWER COMPANY TO
BE ONE OF OBJECTS OF
JACKSON TRIP
s Jackson, the home of the Michigan
s state prison, will be the objective o
f the twelfth Summer session excursion
- tomorrow.
* Of major importance to most stu-
dents will be the tour through the
penitentiary, which will take place in
the morning. This prison ranks high
among state penitentaries. It is a
complete city in itself, having several
well developed industries, which make
the institution self-supporting.
One of the largest industries is the
binder twine plant whose output this
year will amount to 14,000,000 pounds.
This twine is put on the market at
harvest time.
Make Auto Licenses
The stamping factory, where state
- automobile licenses are made, will be
seen. This section of the prison in-
dustries has been considerably en-
larged by the purchase of the entire
' equipment of the old Jackson Stove
and Stamping company. This expan-
sion of the plant has been occasioned
by the increasing influx of orders for
enameled plates of different kinds.
A modern three-story canning plant
is operated by the state. Practically
all kinds of canned goods are put up
here. Four model farms supply the
factory with produce as well as sup-
porting model dairy herds and high
grade livestock.
Other industries include a furniture
factory, a brick plant, and a new gran-
ite works, where tombstones and mon-
uments are made.
Women will be allowed to go through
the guard room and prison annex.
Following the prison trip, the women
of the party may be taken to the Jack-
son Corset company factory.
"Last Time"
Some difficulty was encountered in
securing permission to visit the pris-
on. Mr. Alfred Fischer, director of
the Michigan committee of public util-
ities information, largely through
whoes efforts the trip has been made
possible, says: "This will be the last
time such a group of visitors is likely
to be able to get in unless they wish
to make it their permanent residence."
In the afternoon the party will visit
the gas and electric plants of the Con-
sumers' Power company, whose guests
they will be at luncheon at noon. Jack-
son is the general headquarters of this
company, which operates in two-thirds
of the southern peninsula of the state.
By division of the party into small
groups, it will be made possible for
everyone to ask questions of the
guides, and have everything fully ex-
plained.
Names of those wishing to take the
Jackson trip may be deposited at the
door of the Summer session office,
room 8, University hall. A special In-
terurban leaving the Huron street sta-
tion at 8:47 o'clock will take the tour-

ists to Jackson. Individual expense
will not exceed $2.00, as transporta-
tion is practically the only expense.
Italy To Be In On Allies' Meet
London, Aug. 3.-Italy has arrang-
ed to be represented in the Allied con-
ference in London Monday. The meet-
is expected to end within three days.

CHINA MAY REGAIN
NATIONAL POSITION
"t -CAREY
Professor Declares Country Must be
Left to Work Out Own
Problems
WAS WITH AMERICAN PARTY
SURVEYIN~G GRAND CANAL
"If left to work out her problems
alone in her own way China will once
more assume her proper place among
the great nations" said Prof. Clifton
0. Carey of the surveying department
speaking on the topic "Chinese High-
ways and Byways" yesterday in the
Natural Science auditorium.
Professor Carey was one of the
group of American engineers chosen
f to make a survey of the Grand canal
in China where his work began in
1918. This activity carried the engin-
eers far into the interior of China, so
that they were able not only to observe
the life and conditions in the large
cities but also in the parts usually un-
travelled by foreigners.
1 This Grand canal was begun in 486
B.C., but was not completed in its
present state until 1290 A.D., about
200 years before the discovery of Am-
erica. The waterway is about 900
miles long and was constructed to
convey rice and other grains from
the interior of the country. -The Yel-
low river has made the problem of
keeping up the canal particularly diffi-
cult, for at one time it cut through the
dikes and severed the source of wat-
er along one end of the canal.
Traveling Difficult
The surveyors, said Professor Car-
ey, had particular difficulty in travel-
ing because of the meagre railroad
facilities of but 6,000 miles to accom-
modate a country one-fourth, larg-
er than the United States. The party
had to resort to canal boats, slow but
conmfortable means, to Pekin carts
covering from 20 to 25 miles a day, to
wheel barrows and to sedan chairs.
In commenting upon buildings in
China Professor Carey said that few
of the houses have any artificial heat-
ing devices. Most of those that are
heated have only a bed which is warm-
ed. Temples, palaces, and walls are
the other principal structures. Pro-
fessor Carey showed many illustra-
tions of the large and elaborate templ-
es, evidences of an old civilization.
The summer palace of the emperor
with its great stone boat, according to
Professor Carey, is one of the most im-
pressive points of interest In China.
The Great Wall of China is 1220
miles long continued the speaker, but
it is in reality 2,500 miles in length
considering the double walls which
are built in places. The substructure
is of masonry while the parapet is
fashioned of large bricks, while the
center of the wall is filled in with
earth with a top surface of stone. This
line of defense was build about 2,200
years ago to prevent the country from
becoming overflowed with hordes of
savages.
Peculiar Customs
In speaking of the people, Professor
Carey pointed out their manner of
dress, particularly in the colder clim-
ates, where they wear heavy padded
clothes. They do not, however, use
gloves but keep their hands warm by
inserting them in their large sleeves.
Much of the time the party had to
travel under the protection of federal
soldiers or under the guard of the lo-
cal military authorities to safeguard
them from bandits. One of the pecul-

tar methods of fishing that the Chinese
employ is the use of corbies, a type
of bird, which dive long distances to
catch the fish. They then bring tfeir
prey to the pilot of the boat. To pre-
vent the birds from swallowing the
fish, a string or rubber band is fast-
ened around the neck of the corbies.
(Continued on Page Four)

STUDENT CLOCHES
GIVE YOST DINNER

Athletics in High School Entirely
to You, Coach Tells
Men

Up

"WE MUST NOT FURNISH CLUB
TO CRITICS OF ATHLETICS"
Marking the close of the work of the
summer coaching school, students in
that department last night ,gave a
testimonial dinner in the Union in
honor of Coach Fielding H. Yost and
his staff of assistants and trainers.
After the dinner a meeting was held
in the reading room on the second
floor, where several brief talks were
given by students and instructors on
the merits and value of the new coach-
ing school at Michigan.
Coach Yost the last speaker on the
program, in his address dwelt on the
importance of the coach in his relation
to his students and to the community
as a whole.
Benefit to Average Boy
To the coaches who have just com-
pleted their summer work, Coach
Yost said:
"We hope that you take away with
you something that will prove an as-
set.
"We have tried to give you all the
knowledge within our power to en-
able you to take away with you some-
thing that will be of benefit to the av-
erage boy. The problem which con-
cerns you coaches most is to get this
average boy to realize that the price
of efficiency in athletics in your school
is a lot of hard work, effort and study
on your parts.
"Next year our athletic program will
be carried out in the new field house
on Ferry field where better and larg-
er facilities can better serve you as
well as us.
"Athletics in high school-whether
they are to be clean and sportmanlike
-is entirely up to you. Make the
boys whom you teach realize that ath-
letics stand for the best interests and
for the most advantageous moral as
well as physical training, just as much
for those who are on the sidelines as
wli as those who are competing.
Athletics Being Examined
"Athletics are being thoroughly ex-
amined now, and we must see to it
that we ourselves, insofar as we are
concerned, do not furnish the critic
with a club.
"The game of football is a he-man's
game. It is the spirit that it imbues
that makes it worth while. It is up to
us to make it the clean straight game
it should be."
In concluding Coach Yost declared
that athletic coaches should give to
their work all that they could. "Be
interested in your work and by so
doing you will arouse a spirit of emu-
lation, of leadership, in the boys you
teach. And always remember this,
that at any time you may need us,
we of Michigan are at your service.
SEATTLE TO BE SITE OF
WORLD'S LARGEST TELESCOPE
Seattle, Aug. 3.-Charles H. Frye,
Seattle capitalist, announced today his
selection of Beacon Hill, in South Seat-
tle, for the observatory which will
house the biggest telescope in the
world. The glass, 120 Inches in diam-
eter, and weighing five tons, will be
shipped to Seattle from Vancouver on
a special barge, he added.
See Reed Senator Crow's- Successor
Uniontown, Pa., Aug. 3. - United
States Senator William E. Crow, who
died at his country home near here
yesterday, will be buried Saturday aft-
ernoon. Services will be held at the
home and burial will be here. David
A. Reed is believed to be the man who
will be appointed at Senator Crow's
successor.

3 5 0 VISITORS
SEE OBSERVATORY
Approximately 350 people have ob-
served the moon and several of the
stars, among them Mars, through the
small telescope at the University Ob-
servatory during the past three eve-
nings. Both Monday and Tuesday eve-
nings were especially good evenings
for observations and the shadows on
the moon were clearly discernible.
Last evening, however, clouds obscur-
ed the moon most of the time and it
was only from about 9 to 9:30 o'clock
that observations could be made. Be-
sides being given the opportunity to
look through the telescope guests were
shown about the observatory and ex-
amined the various astronomical in-
struments. The meridan circle, the
instrument used to, secure absolute
time, attracted attention.
Last evening was the last time that
the observatory will be open to Sum-i
mer session students for this purpose.I
It has been a custom in the past to
have open house at the observatoryt
during summer school. These partic-
ular nights were chosen because the
moon was in the first quarter and itf
is then that the shadows are best ob-
servable.-
Prof. William J. Hussey, of the As-
tronomy department, director of the
observatory, had charge of the obser-i
vations.-
ONALDSON TO TEll HOW
TO JUDGE A PICTUREI
UNTRAINED PERSON CAN APPRE.
CIATE ART, BELIEVES IN.-
STRUCTORf
"How to Judge a Picture" is the sub-1
ject of an illustrated lecture to be
given by Bruce M. Donaldson, of the
fine arts department, at 9 o'clock thist
morning in room D of Al-F
umni Memorial hall. Colored slides
will be shown of some of the master-t
pieces.e
Mr. Donaldson believes that the non-
technical spectator can appreciate aX
work of art as well if not better than
the person who is trained in the sub-
ject provided he knows some of the
principles of approach. It is with
hese principles that Mr. Donaldsone
will deal in the lecture this morning.
While the lecture is given primarilys
for the class in written criticism thet
public is invited
Youngsters Leave
For Camp Today4
Seventy-five youngsters, forming thea
fourth and last section of the Univer-i
sity -Fresh Air camp, leave today fora
Pinckney. So far this summer theret
has been only one casualty; when one
boy with shoes on ran through a bed
of hot ashes to get a ball, another,
who was barefooted, attempted to fol-
low him and was burned, painfully but
not seriously. The camp closes Aug.7
14 for the summer.
Yesterday 's Gamesd
American League
Athletics 5, St. Louis 9.r

Washington 2, Chicago 0.c
New York 10, Cleveland 9.1
Boston 0, Detroit 4.
Boston 4, Detroit 7.
National League
Pittsburg 5, Boston 4.
St. Louis 7, Philadelphia 1.
Cincinnati 0, Brooklyn 4.
Chicago 0, New York 5.

SENIORITY STILL
STUMBLING BLOCK
IN STRIKE PEC
RAILROAD HEADS CONTINUE TO
TURN DEAF EAR TO SET-
TLEMENT
FURTHER GOVERNMENT
PLANS NOT DISCLOSED
Rioting In Walkout Circles Again Re-
ported; Jackson Workers
Mobbed
(By Associated Press)
Washington Aug. 3.-Further plans
of the government in connection with
the railroad strike were unrevealed
today although administration agen-
cies were understood to be exploring
the possibilities of settlement on the
basis of assurances conveyed by the
railway executives that they would
consider favorably any proposals that
preserved the seniority rights of shop
men who have continued at work dur-
ing the strike.
The executives in appraising the ad-
ministration the door to further nego-
tiations still was open, were said to
have been emphatic on the condition
as to seniority.
Six St'ates Report Riots
Chicago, Aug. 9.-Violence was re-
ported from six cities in as many
states during the night. Four of the
disturbances assumed the proportions
of riots, one resulting in the death
of one man.
Carl Spradley was killed during an
exchange of shots at Van Buren, Ark.,
between guards in the Missouri Pacific
shops and men said to be strikers. At
Jackson, Mich., several police officers
and striking shop men were slightly
injured when more than a thousand
striker sympathizers including many
women and children attacked non-
union workers with sticks, stones,
eggs and other missiles as the non-
union men were leaving the shops of
the Michigan Central railroad. Fifteen
persons were arrested.
More Seamen to Strike
Detroit, Aug. 3.-Coal passers, deck
hands, able seamen and oilers employ-
ed on Great Lakes freighters wil
strike "in a few days" Thomas Con-
way of Buffalo chairman of the execu-
tive committee of the Great Lakes dis-
trict of the .International Seaman's
union announced here today.
Refused to Join Strike; Killed
Chicago Aug. 3.- Robert Johnson,
42, an employe of the Illinois Central
shops at Burnside, was beaten to
death this morning by four unidenti-
fied men, the police reported. The
assailants escaped. Witnes~ses told
the policemen the four men accosted
Johnson, asked him not to go to work
and then attacked him.
Non-Striking Unions May Confer
Chicago, Aug. 3.-E. J. Manion, of
St. Louis, president of the Railway
Telegraphers' union, has sent letters
to the heads of the 12 railroad unions
not on strike suggesting a meeting to
discuss the growing tendency to in-
volve their men in the shop men's
strike it was learned here today.
Mr. Manion suggested the advisabil-
ity of a conference of the 12 grand
chiefs including heads of the four big
brotherhoods, "to consider action."

Blake Arrives In Ambala
Ambala, British India, Aug. 3.-Maj-
or W. T. Blake, British aviator, at-
tempting to circle the globe, has ar-
rived here from Lahore. Weather is
unfavorable for flying because of mon-
soons.

Shakespeare Playhouse, of New York, Presents in Open Air Campus Theatre, at POPULAR PRICES:
Friday Night, August 4th, 8 o'clock, Galsworthy's "PIGEON"
Saturday Afternoon, August 5th, 4 o'clock, Shakespeare's "TWELFTH NIGHT"
Saturday Night, at 8 o'clock, Barrie's "THE ADMIRABLE CRICHTON"

is.

I Reserved Seats, 75 Cents

General Admission, S Cents'

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