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August 02, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-02

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RALLY FAIR
TODAY

c l e §ixmm

il

No. 35.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2, 1922

DESBECK NAMES
TTER "DIRECTOR
MICHIGAN, FUEL

BELGIUM WILL RECOVER BY STINT
O F INDUSTRY, SAYS PROF. REED;
GERMANY MUST PAY INDEMNITIES

RAIL EXECUTIVES
FROWN ON HARDING
SETTLEMENT PLAN

SHAH'S ADVISOR

SUPERVISE ALL COAL
TRIBUTION FROM
LANSING

DIS.

NTIRE STATE WILL BE
>IVIDED INTO DISTRICTS
ew Administrator Will Undertake
Direction of Mine Problems
Today
..X
(By Associated Press)
Lansing, Aug. 1. - William W. Pot-
. a member of the public utiligies
>mmission, tonight was appointed
y Gov. Alex J. Groesback. as fuel ad-
inistrator for Michigan.
Mr. Potter will direct from Lan-
ng the handling of all priority or-
ers, and supervise the district ad-
inistrators, distribution of all coal,
ipped into the state and the direc-
on of the federal coal distribution
>mmlssion The entire state is to be
ivided into districts, the larger cout-
es being made separate districts.
For Wayne county and Detroit the
>vernor plans to name Charles A.
ean as administrator..
Fred G. Tamkling will be appointed
ir Kent county and Grand Rapids,
ad Robert S. Wallace already has
een appointed for Saginaw.
Other districts are to be mapped
ut by Mr. Potte, who will begin the
erfecting of his full organization to-
orrow, -and will be prepared within
few days to take overi the entire
)al distribution .probletn, now fin the
ands of the utilities commission.
'aculty Fans To
lie Given Chance
Baseball games at the get-togeth-
's" of members of the School of d-
pation have been such a drawing
ard hat it has becomp necessary to
ake out a new program In order to
t everyone play at least part of a
une. .
Elimer D. Mitchell, director of intra-
Lural athletics, will have three dia-
.onds ready by tomorrow to accom-
odate more players. he captains
iosen for the six teams are Tuck, of
wosso, Hiar, of Wyandotte, Harring-
In, of Albion, Beam, of Richmond, and
B~ody and May of the University.
The captains:are to draw their men,
rho drill play five innings each,. and
ien give place to others drawn in a
milar way who will finish opt an-
her five innings. All summer tu-
ets are invited td, come. and take
art in the activiles. Cool drinks will
e served free of charge.
NOW YOUR UlNIVESITY
Organization of the Women's league
'as accomplished in 1890. It was
arted at the instigation of former
resident Angell as a fruit and flow-
r mission; the members visited local
,spitals and cheered the patients with
.ch gifts. In 1890 it was decided that
he organization should be enlarged
kd called the Women's league. Ethel
ountaifi Hussey was the first presi-
ent; Ilene Fisher, '23, is acting presi-
ent for the Summer sssion.
-overnor May Held Coal Conference
Indianapolis, Aug. 1.-Governor Mc-
ray, of Indiana, today invited the
overnors of Ohio, Illinois, Michigan,
Visconsin, Kentucky, and Pennsylva-
la to meet Thursday, Aug. 3, for a
onference on the coal situation.

"The productive energy of the Bel-t
gian people will return Belgium to a9
condition of prosperity within a com-
paratively short space of time," said
Prof. T. H. Reed, of the University ofc
California political science de'part-t
ment, yesterday in his lecture onf
"Belgium Today" in the Natural Sci-
ence auditorium.t
Professor Reed spent most of the
last year doing research work in Bel-
gium for a book which is soon to be]
published.t
, "Up to 1914," said Professor Reed,£
"Belgium was a 'terra incognita'. It
is time we caue to learn something
about Belgium. We have much to
learn from that country in social, ec-
onomic,' a4 political problems. There
is certain danger in that we think of
.mere size as the important thing."
the speaker continued, showing that
some of the most important democrat-
ic contributions in the history of the
world have been made by the small
states, such as Greece. Along this
same vein, Professor Reed added,
"There is perhaps more to learn ir
Belgium from the political science
point of view than there Is in any
other country in the world."
In telling of the industry of the Bel-
glans, the speaker, remarked that ev-
erybody worked. "Reconstruction Is
going on in Belgian more rapidly than1
in any other country today. The
French are waiting for the government
to do something." But the orphanages
and some of the fields of Flanders]
show .more than anywhere else the
ravages of war..
Germany Must Pay
The finances of the Belgian govern-
ment are in "bad shape" according to
Professor Reed, since dependence isI
placed upon the .German indemnities.
If the Germans fall to pay the indemn-
ities, both France and Belgium, said
the speaker, will face bankruptcy. In
accounting for the rapid return of
Belgium to prosperity, Professor Reed,
pointed out that the country has great
natural resources and was a main sta-
tion on the international trade routes.
The speaker indicated the, importance'
of Belgium in its geographical position
as 'being able to control the whole of
Northern Europe. This was the thought
in the minds of the European nations
when they made Belgium neutral ter-
ritory in 1830, continued Professor
Reed, and it was the dominant idea of
the Germans when they made their in-
vasion in 1914. "Belgium is no longer
a neutral field, but is independent,"
declared Professor Reed. Belgium is
now protected by alliances with Great
Britain and France, in which those two
powers have agred to protect Bel-
gium. "Belgium is the 'key of the
whole balance of European power."1
"The Belgian is an individualist,";
continued the speaker, "but one who
understands the art of co-operation.
He has worked out a tradition of in-
dependent government." Oppression at
various times proved the value of the
local governments, which demonstra-
tes the soundness of their democratic
organization. Even during the war,
when the established central govern-
ment was forced to evacuate, the local
governments continued to function.
The "ultimate test of any government
in the world lies in the efficiency of its
local autonomy," the speaker added.
The people by universal suffrage of
men and women elect the council who
choose the burgomaster. The burga-
master is theoretically the appointee
of the king, but practically he is al-
ways the choice of th people.
)as Second Oldest Constitution,
Next to the United States Belgium
has the oldest written constitution in
the world. She has the oldest in Eu-

rope. The constitution, of Belgium,
said Professor Reed, extends a high
degree of individual liberty to the peo-
ple. Gradually the suffrage has been

extended until ther.e is now universial
suffrage for men.
Belgium has a stronger party sys-
tem than our own. The three parties,
the Socialists, Catholics and Liberals
dominate the whole country. The first
two aim to extend a system that satis-
fies every human want. They offer co-
operative stores, party unions, party
theaters, party insurance, and so on.
These three parties sit in the chamber
of deputies which elects the ministry.
In Belgium, however, the speaker con-
trasted, there are no political land-
slides for there is proportional rep-
resentation. Voting is compulsory in
Belgium and for failure 'to comply
with this law four times a._man loses,
his ballot afid right to hold public
office for 10 years. The result is that
(Continued on Page Four)
BOOSTERS ACQUIRE BIB
ELECTRIC SCOREBOARD
FOR FOOTBALL GAMES

FOR NEWEr
BUILDIN -G
STRUCTURE WILL HAT
CAPACITY 01
12,500
STEEL WORK WI
FINISHED WITHIN
Will Be One of Two Big
Ings Large Enough to
modate Conference

SENIORITY QUESTION
* DIVIDING WEDGE
CONFERENCE

REPORT MEN READY
TO ACCEPT PROPOSAL
Operators Declare Restoration Would
Be Breach of Faith with
New Employes
BULLETIN
Chicago, Aug. 1.- Acceptance of
President Harding's railroad peace
plan by the striking shop men was
practically assured tonight when the
strikers' policy committee of 90 ad-
journed until tomorrow when definite
action is expected to be taken.
This was learned from union leaders
after a four hour session today in
which the President's suggestions were
fully discussed and explained to the
committee.

BECOMES
IN

DR. R. C. MILLSPAUGH, FORMER-
ly' of the State Department in Wash-
ington, has begin appointed chief
financial adviser to the Persian gov-
ernment.
. 'f
SHAKESPEARE CAST
LAUD0EDON TOUR
Mr. Frank McEntee whose reputation
as an actor and producer of the drama

Michigan will no longer have to de-
pend on meagre ticker and newspaper
reports of the Big Ten football games
in which the Wolverines engage on
foreign fields. The presentation of anf
electric scoreboard, maintenance andf
accessories for which will total $1,000,
by the Boosters' association to the
Booster committee on athletic affairs
wirovide detailed play by play re-
por or all of the big football games
when Michigan plays away from home.
Each play will be recorded on the
board five seconds after it occurs, elec-
trically-controlled indicators and1
gu s showing the exact position of
the all on the field, and following the
game in every move.
The board is an exact duplicate of a
gridiron. On each side of this minia-
ture gridiron the names of the- men
are placed in the positions they play1
on the teams, the indicators showing
bright electric lights in front of the
player's name who is carrying the
ball or who is the important factor in
any play. It also records downs, yards
gained and lost, kicks, formations, for-
ward passes, time out, and time left
for play, as well as an accurate ree- I
ord of the score.
It is expected that the work on the
scoreboard will be completed and
ready for delivery in time for the Van-.
derbilt game.
This device has been used by several
other large universities and has been1
declared successful. The Ohio State-
Chicago Conference game was record-
ed for home followers on the score-
board, as was also the Washington and
Jeffeson-California game.,
WELLS GUESTOF BOOSTERS
AND CHAMBER' OF COMMERCE
Carlton E. Wells, instructor in
rhetoric, and new Michigan state golf
champion, was guest of honor at a
luncheon yesterday at the Chamber
of Commerce inn. . More than 60 Ann
Arbor business and professional men,
members of the Chamber of Com-
merce and Boosters' club were pres-
ent.
A silver trophy cup was presented
to Mr. Wells by Prof. F. N. Mene-
fee, of the Enginering college, who
was chairman of the meeting follow-
ing the'luncheon, in behalf of the
Chamber of Commerce.
Spencer Lays Coal Plans
Washington, Aug. 1.-A plan of pro-
cedure under which the government
emergency fuel control machine will
be operated was completed today at a
meeting of the central coal committee
with Fuel Distributor Henry B. Spen-
cer presiding.

{ I is firmly established is bringing to

(By Assoclated Press)
New York, Aug. 1. - Railway ex-
ecutives of the nation today rejected
the program advanced by the, Hard-
ing administration for settlement of
the rail strike..
Willing to accept conditionally two
suggestions put forward by the White
House-that both sides abide by wage
decisions of the Railroad Labor board
" and that- law suits springing out of
the strike be withdrawn-the heads
of 148 roads declared emphatically
that it was impossible to reinstate
strikers, with unimpaired seniority
rights, the third provision in the
President's plan, because such action
would be a breach of faith wth new
employes.
The decision not to yield on the
question of seniority was made known,
to the White House by telegraph aft-
er the rail heads had listened to a 20
minute address by Secretary of Com-
merce Hoover, who, as direct repre-
sentative of the President, told them,
in effect, that the administration held
the seniority- question of minor im-
portance in comparison with that of
upholding the Railroad Labor board.
This action was taken in the face of
a letter from President Harding ad-
dressed to T. DeWitt Cuyler, chair-
man of the American association of-
railway executives, embodying the
terms of agreement "as I understand
them, upon which the railway mana-
gers of united shop craft workers are
to agree, preliminary to calling off
the existing. strike."
75 ENTERTAINED
AT LE AGUE TEA

Ann Arbor a strong cast to support
him from reports that 'have come
from the cities the company has fl-
ready -visited. The Shakespearean
Playhouse of New York will give both
Shakespearean. plays and several of'
the more worth while and entertaining
plays ,of modern dramatics.
The out of door theater that this
company will use will be located be-
tween the Library and, the Museum.
The stage is to be. built where the
grandstand was erected during Com-
mencement week, just back of Pres-
ident Burton's tennis court. In case
of rain the .performances will be con-
tinued in University hallauditorium.
"The Taming of the Shrew" -will be
presented at 8 o'clock -Thursday night,
and "The Pigeon," one of Galsworthy's
plays will be given Friday night.
"Twelfth Night" .is to be given. at 4
o'clock Saturday afternoon. "The Ad-
-mirable Mr. Crichton" is the last of
the plays which will be presented here
and is to be given Saturday night.
Tickets are on sale at Wahr's book-
store. Reserved seats are 75' cents,
general admission is 50 cents, and
$2.25 is the price of tickets to all four
of the plays. This makes it possible
to see four performances for the price'
of three..
CALIFORNIA WINE
SUPPLY GREATLY
EXCEEDS DEMAND

Excavation for the founde
the, new field house will s
Ferry field this morning, w
first god will be turned for 1
dations. Christman and cot
Detroit have the contracts
concrete work. By Aug. 10 1
ed that the north end of the
tions will be sufficiently com
that the constructors may
erection of the steel, which
rolled by the Bethehem St
and fabricated in Detroit.
To Supply All Needi
When the new field hous
ished, Michigan will have on
greatest athletic plants in t
try. Facilities furnished by
house together with those
available will supply every
all the sports recognized by
ference. Ample room for ind
tice will be offered.
Equipment sufficient to h
freshman and -Varsity athlet
include an 8 lap to the mile
75 yard straightaway,. severa
ball courts, and provisions
door football and baseball :
Waterman gymnasium then
freed from the congestion c
the classes by athletic p'rat
rinods.
Seating Capacity 12,5
Clear of obstruction to a
63 feet, the main activity roc
ures 300 by 160 feet with
for 12,500 spectators. The
this room corresponds exac
the dimensions of the stand
ball field.

GUN AND BL
TO HOt

There will be a revival of
fashioned picnic Saturday a
when the Gun and Blade clt
tVains at Whitmore Jake.
are asked to buy their ticket
are priced at $1, at either'W
Grahamn's bookstore, bring th
ket of lunch and meet at tl
by 1 &-clock.
The club will furnish th
portation to and from the la
tertainment has been plawn
everybody. Ice cream and co
also be furnished by the clul
FORMER U. S. REPRESENTA'
OF, SINN FEIN, DIES IN

Both men and women we're enter-
tained yesterday afternoon at the tea
given at the Chi Omega house, 1503
Washtenaw avenue, by the Woman's
League. Approximately 75 people
were present during the afternoon.
Mrs. Wilbur R. Humphreys, Mrs.
Thomas E. Rankin and Miss Helen
C. Bishop were the hostesses. Punch
and cookies were served the guests.
This was ,the fourth, of the teas
given by the League 'this summer
and it gill conclude its activities un-
til the opening of the fall term.
Report De Valera Coming to U. S.
New York, Aug. 31.- Eamonn de
Valera, leader of the Irish insurgents,
has slipped out of war-torn Ireland,
and is on his way to the United States
to plead for financial support to. fight
the Irish Free State government, it
was reported in Hibernian circles here
today.

(By Associated Press)
San Francisco, Calif., Aug. 1.-Wine
is being produced in California faster.
than the beverage is consumed; and
about five times as much has been
made the last year as has been With-
drawn from bond, according to John
McLaughlin, colector of internal rev-
enue.
In the fiscal year ending June 30,
1922, the,' production of wine in the
northern half of the state exceeded
withdrawals by 2, 877,490 gallons, his
report shows. Ong July 1, 1922, there
was on hand in the bonded wineries of
the northern part of California 14,-
236,429 gallons of dry wine and 5,135,-
531 gallons of sweet wine.
PHILIPPINE SHIPPING TRAFFIC
IS PARALIZED BY STRIKE

Dublin, Aug. 1.-Harry
former representative of
Fein, in the United States, d
in a hospital here of wound
early this morning in the G
in Skerries, a fishing villag
Dublin, while attempting to
ture by troops of the natiot
Students to Visit Ford
Summer session student
spect the Ford plants at R
this afternoon, on the eleve
sursion on the Summer E
gram. The party will leav
bor on the 1 o'clock interi
State and Packard streets a
rive at the general office
o'clock.. Return to Ann
be made at 6:30 o'clock.

Manila, Aug. 1.-Interisland vessels
as well as governmental coast guard
vessels and ships operated by the gov-
ernment railroad are tied up and in-
terisland traffic is paralized as the re-
sult of a shipping strike declared at
midnight Sunday.

.._,

[AKESPEARE PLAYHOUSE Presents in Open Air Campus Theatre, at POPULAR P
ursday Night, Aug. 3rd, 8 o'clock, Shakespeares "Taming of the Shrew" Saturday Afternoon, Aug. 5th, 4 o'clock, Shakespeare's "Twelfth
day Night, Aug. 4th,8 o'clock, Galsworthy's 'Pigcon" I Saturday Night, at 8 o'clock, Barrie's "The Admirable Crici

,

Cents. General Admission, SO Cents.

Reserved Seats for four

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