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August 01, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-08-01

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TELLS WHY NATIONS WERE
A T ODDS ABOUT ISLAND OF Y AP

"The importance of Yap in theI
world's affairs, and its dominant posi-t
,on in the news of the period," said t
Prof. William H. Hobbs, -of the geol-
Dgy department, in a recent article
printed in the Current History maga-
2ne of the New York Times "it owes
almost exclusively to the fact that it
[s the junction point of the oceanic
cable lines which run to Manila (by
way of Guam), to Shanghai, and to
94nado' on the Island of Celebes. As
this nerve center in the international
cable system is figured in the discus-
sions of the peace conference at Paris
and remained a subjec of internation-
al difference until the United States
and Japan finally reached an agree-
ment on it during the early weeks of
the arms conference."
Professor Hobbs said that the most
famous man of the island was the
Irish-American David D. O'Keefe, "the
most successful man this part of the
Pacific has ever developed. When he
disappeared in 1901 his property was
reported to be valued at some millions
of Germans marks.....
-O'Keefe Great Leader
"O'Keefe," lontinued Professor
Hobbs, "was the type of man who in
Sarawak would have been Rtajah; as
was Brooks; but here was already es-
tablished the civil government of
Spain. Fom the native he bought the.
copra (dried cocoanut meat), tran'
ported it to Hongkong on his schoon-
er, and returned laden with the goods
of which they stood in need. The
small army of natives which moved at
his command, and on whom he used his
fists freely whenever the occasion de-
manded, had been recruited not alone
from Yap, but from those . isolated
islands for to the southward .
lsends which are still desc'ribed in
the pilot books of navigators as in-
habited by natives that are fierce and
Wild and on no account to be trusted."
Professor Hobbs described the na-
tives as "of muscular development
with a dark brown skin and curly
black hair, the old men frequently
wearing beards. The only clothing of
the men is the narrow breech. cloth,
usually red, and the women and girls
wear as their only garment a short
skirt of grass or leaves, which may be
replaced by a woven fabric of excellent
Solvay Athletic ,lub, Whitmore
Lake, special frog, fish, and chicken
dinners. Room and board by day or
.eek.-Adv.
S vummer
W atch Chaps
The new summer watch
chain may be attached to
the belt or lapel of coat.
$1.50 upwards
Haller & Fuller
STATE STREET JEWELERS

workmanship. The love of ornamen-
tation, which is highly developed in
these natives, shows itself particularly
in the use of combs by the men, these
combs being of many forms and gen-
erally constructed out of wood of the
white mangrove. ..
Build "Fa-lu" and "Pa-bal" \
These natives are entitled to a
higher place in civilization, accord-
ing to Professor Hobbs, because of the
"design, workmanship, and artistic
decoration of the club houses . .
The community houses are of two
types, the "fa-lu," or bachelors' club-
house, and the larger and more elabor-
ately decorated "pa-bai," which, though
built especially -for men, is open to
the women as well.
"All about the Spa-bais' and the 'fa-
lus', and in a lesser degree about the
houses of the kings and chieftains; are
to be seen the great money wheels of
aragonite which these hardy voyagers'
or their ancestors have brought on
their rafts two hundred miles across
the open sea from the Pelew islands
to the southwest. As some of these
wheels are fully seven feet in diameter
and their weight is measured in tons,
their use as money must be looked on
rather as a bank deposit n.ot easily
convertable during a panic, and far
better to be reckoned as prestige."
The'Germans during their occupancy
of the islands did much to improve
the islands with their contributions of
public works such as the construction
of a road and a canal.'
Germans Active on Yap
"A wireless station" sand Profes-
sor Hobbs, ''which had been built by
the Germans for communicatinggwith
the others islands in the Caroline group
and by relays with the outside world,
is another important service which
the Germans have to their credit.
With the outbreak of the World. War
a British fleet appeared at Yap and
by ,bombardment destroyed the wire-
less plant to sever the islan.d's con-
nection with the outside world. The
concrete bases for the wireless masts
are all that now remain of the Ger-
man plant at Yap, but a new one has
been erected at a different point by the
Japanese government."
In concluding, Professor Hobbs said:
t"We have !retained a most friendly
feeling with the native islanders, as
we have for the Japanese officials, who
did everything in their power to pro-
mote the geological investigations
which was the purpose of my visit.
The Japanese governor was seriously
ill, b'it he got up from his bed in or-
der to receive us and made every pro.
vision possible by guides, canoes and
natives for rendering access to the
places I desired to visit."

WHAT'S GOING ON
Tuesday August 1.
5 p. m.-Belgium Today. Prof. T. H.
Read, University of California.
8 p. m.-'The Osborne Expedition of
the University in the Pacific," illus-
trated lecture by Prof. William H.
Hobbs, of the Geology department.
Natural Science auditorium.
8:30 p. m.--Visitors' Night at the Ob-
servatory. Admission by ticket only.
Wednesday, August 2
1 p. m.-Excursion No. eleven - Riv-
er Rouge Blast Furnaces, south of
Detroit. Leave at 11 p. M.-,-
5 p., m.-"Porto Rico." (In Spanish).
(Illustrated). Mr. A. E. Mercado.
8 p. m.-Concert. Faculty of the Un-
iversity School of Mnifsic (Hill au-
ditorium).
8:30 p. m.--Visitors' Night at the Ob-
servatory. Admission by ticket only.

ed, are requested to notify T. L. Pur-
dom, either by letter or by calling
801. Allmembers are to meet prompt-
ly at 3:45 o'clock at Tappa'n hall, and
automobiles will carry . them to their
destination.

v

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GEOLOGY PROFESSOR WILL DIS-
CUSS RECENT WORLD TOUR
TONIGHT

ST UDE
RIVER

(By Special Wire to The Summer
Daily)'
Chicago, Ill., July 31.--Final and
d0sperate efforts to. prevent 20,000
street car men and elevated railway
eiaployes of Chicago from striking
have failed.
When it was learned that in no way
could the threatened walkout, which
was scheduled for 4 o'clock Tuesday
morning, be stopped, suburban rail-
ways, motor bus companies and au-
tomobile owners began, hasty prepar-
ations to provide transportation for the
city and its suburbs. The strike of
the elevated workers will probably be
called someitime Wednesday.
All attempts of business men, city
officials, union leaders and car line
chiefs had failed in their efforts to
avert a walkout, which was precipitat-
ed by the demand of the surface lines
that their men accept a yage reduction'
of approximately 17, per cent.

Speaking on "The Osborne Expedi-
tion of the University in the Pacific,"
Prof. William H. Hobbs of the geology
department, will address the members
of the Summer session at 8 'o'clock to-
night. y
Professor Hobbs left Michigan eArly
in August for his trip around the
world for scientific investigation. The,
U. S. government put under his order
the 1,000 ton gunboat Bittern, which
cruised more than 6,000 miles under
his direction. Yodo, a Japanese fast
cruiser, was placed at his disposal
by the Japanese government for a
three days' steam in 'order to make
connections. Japanese merchant ves-
sels were also held over from sailing
from one to three days in certain
parts of the Pacific that Professor
Hobbs might visit certain islands.
Wherever the party stopped at ports
under Japanese rule, they were the

(Continued
ferred to the H;
1irzd's E
Visitors at the

and further, a much g
processes, than- at th
known Highland Park
25,000 men are em:
grounds at the blast
tries.
An added feature 01
a bird's eye view of
of the Ford plants at
eluding the unloadin
age docks, gained fror
el by elevator.
The party will leav
1 o'clock Wednesday,
return on the car th
Arbor at 6:50 o'clock.
White swan Laund

Thursday, August 3,
5 p. m.-Prof. C. O. Carey lectures on,
"Chinese Highways and Byways."
8 p. m.-Open air performance of
{ Shakespeare's "The Taming of the
Shrew." The Shakespeare Play-
house company of New York City
(Campus theater). Admission 'will
be charged.
Friday, August 4 /
3:30 p. m.-Open air performance of
Galsworthy's "The Pigeon." The
Shakespeare Playhojpse company of
New York City. (Campus theater).
Admission will be charged.
WILL HONOR GOLF
CHAMPION. TODAY
Members of the Ann Arbor Cham-
ber of Commerce and the Michigan
Boosters club will give a joint ban-
quet at 12 o'clock today in honor of
Carlton F. Wells, of the department
of rhetoric, who recently won the ti-
tle of amateur golf ohampion of the
state of Michigan in the state .title
elimination tournament. ,
;Wells was the surprise of the
turney, his name being barely famil-
iar to enthusiasts of the sport. He
won from a fast field of entries, sev-
eral of Detroit's star performers be-
ing entered in the lists against him.
He won his matches with ease, and
although his play was not considered
brilliant, it was at all times con-
sistent and steady.
Tickets for the banquet may be pro-
cured today at the Chamber of Com-
merce building.

guests of the government and shown i and- service.

BARGAIN
COUNTER

BOOK

E ducational
0

if t y C ent

Ea e h

Of special interest to Summer School Teachers
and Students. . " New titles added daily.

WAH R's

UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORI

, ,

FR ATERNITIES,
SORORITIES and
CLUBS wishing to buy
or rent, can have their
needs satisfied by call-
ing the ANN AR13OR
.REALTY COMP'Y
Nat'l Bank Bldg. Phoie 40
WITH OIR WITHOUT DRIVER rnnu
416 S. MI D. .i0583J
Special Trips. !or Parties
New 1-Passenger. Bus
Round T rigto Bathing.Beach, $i:
Sunday Schedule:
9 a. m. and every two hours
till 9 p. i.
Special rates on Dance Parties
of io or more.

All Charges Included
Azores,Qibralter, Napes, Pu
Fast American Twin-Screw 15,000 ton Ma
" EP H ILA DE LP HIA"\

A Yankee Ship

A Y

SAINING AU(

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SENIORITY MOST
IMPORTANT ISSUE
(Contiuued from Page One)
of seniority positions was to deter-
mine the order in which men should
be discharged when reductions in
shap forces were put into effect, and
the orders in which they were to go
be taken back in case of increases in
force.
Seeks General Settlement
The President's proposals were said
to be 1engthy, but the only highly
controversial matter dealt with sen-
iority. In general, the men would
go back to work, accepting the rail-
road labor board's awards, with an
opportunity for a rehearing before
the board, the railorads agreeing to
drop all outside contracting of shop
owrk-as practically all of them have
3lready done' and agree in addition
to set up boards of adjustment to
consider grievances.
Subscribe today for 't'he Summer

EDUCATIONAL FRATERNITY
TO HOLD LAST MEET FRIDAY
Phi Delta Kappa, national honor-
ary educational fraternity, will hold its
last meeting on Friday afternoon and
evening, Aug. 4. An outing, dinner,
and talks by Dr. Meyers, Dr. Jackson,
and Dr. Yoakum, are the program.
Those expecting to attend and wish-
ing transportation and dinner provid-

q

.

I'

Accommodations reserved
east and west bound passel
D ir e c t connections to
Swiss, Italian, and Near E

i

Apply at the office of 2Iie Summer J'ichig4
JOHN J. DVYER, General PassengeN
New York-Naples Steamship Comp
150 Broadway, New York City

H. C. FRY BUS LINE.

303 SO. DIVI ION
Home Board

I

Phone 2754.R

Bonus-bona-

}

$6.00 for THREE MEALS

$5.50 for TWO MEALS

Have your seven o'clocks and come to Breakfast afterwards.

Breakfast 7:30 to 8:30

Lunch 12 to 1

Dinner 5:30 to 6:30

1.

NN AR BOI

Mrs F. Dailey;

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every business, and selling life insurance af-
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who are ambitious and willing to work, and who have the
character and stamina necessary to stamp their individuality U
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- The traditions and practices of the JOHN HANCOCK are such ,
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Williams' Shaving Soaps
have been a tradition

A

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iams' Shaving Cream does away with
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That rich white lather that st
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