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June 19, 1922 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-06-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILV

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HUGHES UPHOLDS
OPEN DIPLOMACYI
(Contiuued from Page One)
tive power of the Nation is vested in
the President, subject to the excep-
tions and qualifications expressed in
the Constitution. .......
Leaders Should Co-dperate
"I should not favor a change in the
distribution of power or any modifica-
tion of practice which would encour-
age the notion that the Executive is
responsible to the legislative branchI
of the Government in matters which
under the Constitution are exclusively
of executive concern. . . . . But
speaking in my private capacity and
expressing only a personal opinion,
I do believe in multiplying the
facilities for appropriate co-operation
between responsible leaders, who un-
derstand their respective functions, in
a manner suited to the full discussion
of great international questions when
these fall within the constitutional
ocmpetency of the Senate.....
"The paramount importance of con-
tact with the Press is fully recognized,
but in the nature of things, this con-
tact for the most part must be in-
formal. What is desired is not control,
of news but accurate information. To
meet this demand, the President him-
self meets the correspondents twice
a week and department heads still
more frequently. The Secretary of

State has two press conferences each
working day at which either the Sec-
retary or the Under-Secretary is
present. The officers are not quoted,
but there is frank disclosure of facts
and aims withing the widest possible
limits. There is thus the most direct
contact with those who are the prin-
cipal purveyors of information and
the chief educators of the public. This
is our substitute for parliamentary
interpellation. It is in this manner
'that, in substance, account is ren-
dered to the final authority.
"But open diplomacy must still be
diplomacy, and it canot be open at
the cost of losing its essential char-
acter and of frustrating its proper
purposes. By. diplomacy, I mean the
art of conducting negotiations witl
foreign Powers, and when we refer,
with suitable discrimination, to open
diplomacy, we have in mind the appro-
priate publication of international
negotiations, the absence of intrigue,
priately disclosed; that there should
candor and directness. The diplomacy
of the United States has been, and is,
"open diplomacy. . . . ..
Good-WillE ssential
"Moreover, the maintenance of in-
ternational good-will during negoti-
ations is of vital importance. While
it is assumed that democracies are
peace-loving, it cannot be forgotten
that the activities of democracies fre-
quently make it difficult to arive at
a good understanding.,
"With all these considerations, it
remains true that there should be no
secrecy for its own sake; that gen-
eral policies should be made clear;

I

that particular aims should be appro-t
privately disclosed; that there should
be public announcement of all pro-
ceedings to the extent consistent with
that essential requirements of negoti-
ation; and that nothing should ever
be done by our diplomatic agents
which as far as its actual character,
is concerned could not be publicly
proclaimed and justified as being free
from artifice and deception and in full
accord with American principles....
"The principal difficulty at this time
in our conduct of foreign affairs is
not without method, prejudiced and
inflammatory discussions in which
some of our citizens and certain por-
tions of the press permit themselves
to indulge. If there is to be less re-
ticence in diplomacy, there must be,
if not a greater reticence, it least a
keener sense of responsibility in the
discussion of international questions.
Open diplomacy and blatant and. inju-
dicious utterances will not go well to-
gether. The corrective can only be
found in that state of the public mind
which will unsparingly condemn and
ostracize those who by their base im-
putations imperil our friendly rela-
tions with other nations....
Foresees New Era
"There are those who view the dis-
locations caused by the war, the pres-

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.ent wide-spread impoverishment, the
assaults and too frequent triumphs of
unreason, the controversies over
superficialties and the ignoring of
the cause of distress and insta-
bility, with a feeling of hope-
lessness. But this is not the end
,of the world; rather it is the begin-
ning of a new era, a formative period
when it is the highest privilege to live
and perform one's part....
"Above all we need the spirit of
reasonableness which men and wo-
men of good sense and culture may
bring to public discussion,-that calm
Judgment which proceeds from wide
knowledge and keen insight."

E

ADVOCATES OF PROHIBITION
TO MEET IN OKLAHOMA CITY
Oklahoma City, Okla., June 19.-.
Advocates of prohibition from - six'
states will gather here June 25 for a
conference at which plans will be laid
to aid the election of senators and con-
gressmen who are opposed to a re-
vision of the prohibitory laws so as to
permit the use of beer and light wines
for beverages, according to a prelim-
inary outline of the program made
public here by H. T. Laughbaun, su-
perintendent of the anti-saloon league
of Oklahoma.
Typewriters of standard makes sold
and rented. 0. D. Morrill, 17 Nickels'
Arcade.-Ady.

Play Claims 'ust Be Made Now

Persons having bills against the
Senior Girls' play committees should
present claims as soon as possible to
Mildred Chase, at 718 Tappan avenue.
Your name embossed free of charge
on all fountain pens purchased from
O. D. Morrill, 17 Nickels' Arcade.-
Adv.
46 issues-The Summer Michigan
Daily-46 issues.-Adv.
RAIN WATER SHAMPOOS
Marcelling Manicuring
Water Waving
Mrs. T. L. Stoddard
Tel. 2652 107 N. UniversitV

Rider's Pen Shops, 308 S.
Adv.

State.-I

i'

110OKS

GIFT EDITIONS

FUZR

C0 M M E N C E M E N T

Aw

AUR9'S

U NIVERS I T Y
BOO K STORES

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,

Catering

Canoe and Party Orders

SUMMER STUDENTS

1

For light Luncheons after the show or canoe trip
stop at
Te Blue Bird Delicatessen

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Phone 155

1112 South University

KEE PlCOOL!
Especially during hot weather it is wise to avoid needless worry.
You won't have to worry about your Clotkes Cleaning, if they
are regularly Energined.
Swissiized Garments Stay Clean Longer
Cleaning
PHONE Pressing
2509 Repairing
2APleating
~The Home of Energine'"
209) South Fourth.Avenue

1

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STUDENTS' SUPPLY STORE
1111 South University Ave.

The City Y. W. C. A.
invites the Alumni
and visitors to try its
home baked foods in

Engineers' and Architects' Materials
Stationery Fountain Pens Loose Leaf Books
Cameras and Supplies,

Candies

Laundry Agency

Tobaccos

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UI

PAN

all

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their cafeteria.

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508 East William St.

Ann Arbor
Savings Bank
Two Offices:
N. W. Corner Main and Huron St
707 N. University Ave.

Ln

.Palm

I

beach

Sums

i

I

I

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We also wish to emphasize the unusual values found in our Halifax Tweeds
and Palm Beach Suits and Golf Sweaters. You are always able to use these
clothes to advantage and that is one reason why they are so economical. Hal-
ifax Tweed suits complete are selling for $18,00. Don't delay in making
your selection because, at this price we expect them to move.
Palm Beach Suits from $10.00 up - These are all ready to wear.
EARLY SHOWING OF FALL SUITINGS

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Exclusive Designs
in
Afternnoon and Evening Gowns
239 Nickels' Arcade Phone 795W
Mrs. Grace Van Schoick

I.

Karl

)Yalcolm

I

F' -

I

I

I -

sIlK. i

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TUTTLES

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For-

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A place to bring your friends.
the food better; nowhere is
- more prompt. Open all

Nowhere is
the service
summer.

Summer Comfort
Use electrical appliances

-

Michigan's

TUTTLE'S LUNCH ROOM
MAYNARD STREET

I Favorite College Songs

.r.. .
.....

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11

The Electric Fan

250 pages of your Alma Mater
Songs and views of Ann Arbor

SUMMER SESSION

will keep you cool all summer. It costs less than
a cent an hour to run and will last a life-time.

-

College Songs
Sheet Form

June 26-August 18

The Electric Grill
will cook right on the table.
It is ideal for summer lunches.

SHORTHAND

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TYPEWRITING

The Electric Iron

Records

Yellow and Blue
College Days

Victors
Varsity

When Night Falls, Dear
Ann Arbor Days

BOOKKEEPING
SECRETARIAL

enables you to do careful work in
possible time and with the least effort.
convenient and efficient.

the shortest
It is clean,

TRAINING

The

auttarb at William

Hamilton Business College
STATE AND WILLIAM STS. ANN ARBOR

DETROIT EDISON
Company

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