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July 30, 1922 - Image 1

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Michigan Daily, 1922-07-30

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No. 33

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, JULY 80, 1922,

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1

3EACE IN 'STRiKE
ZIRLS EXPECTED
.BY RA L LADERS
NION HEADS CONFIDENT THAT
MEETING NEXT WEEK WILL
END WALKOUT
LLSO ASSERT MEN TO
R E T'A I N SENIORITY
'imothy Healy Says "Settlement is in
the Hands of President
.Harding"
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, July 29.-Leaders of the
triking railway shop men returning
om conferences with President Hard-
ig tonight expressed confidence that
he walkout would be terminated as a
esult of meetings of railway execu-
tes and employees committees next
reek to consider proposals submitted
y the President.
They also asserted that the strikers
ill return to work with the seniority
ghts unimpaired if they return at
11. B. M. Jewell head of the shop
raft organization, shook his head
nulingly when newspaper men at-
empted to question him. He refused
term the outlook hopeful or oth-
rwise, but declared that "it was safe
> assume that the meeting of the
iop craft policy committee was call-
i to hear suggestions for terminating
Me strike."
Timothy Healy, president of, the
remen and oilers union, which also
on strike, told newspapermen that
e expected Tuesday's meetings to re-
ilt in a settlement.
Asked concerning the stage peace
egotiations had reached Mr. Healy
aid that, "The peae is in the hands
f the President," He refused to be
noted to the effect that a settlement
f, the Issues between the, railroads
nd the strikers had been tentatively
greed upon between Mr. Jewell and
. DeWitt Cuyler, as a result of the
onferences with the President.
UNDA1y SERVICES IN
ANNARJBOR CHURCHS
Rev. W. B. Shirey, director of relig-
fus education of the Presbyterian
hurch of Michigan, will speak this
orning at the regular morning serv-:
e at the Presbyteran church on the
ibject, "Following God's Plans." Rev-
rend Shirey is taking the place of
ev. Leonard A. Barrett, the pastor,
'ho has left for Wooster, Ohio, on his
aeation., The University Fresh 'Air
amp will be the subject of the dis-
ission at the student noon elass at
1:45. The talk will be given by Louis
G Reimann who has been directing
te camp during the summer. The
gular meeting of the Christian En-
eavor will be held at 6:30 o'clock,
ith Alex Burr as leader. The topic
i be takenti up will be "Christianity in
idustry."
"The Peril of the Lonely," is the
ibject"of Rev. A. W. Stalker's ser-
ton at the morning servce at the
irst Methodist church. A devotional
Meeting will be held by the Wesleyan
uild at 6:30 o'clock.
Rev. Sidney' S. Robbins will discuss
E. G. Wells's Outline of History," 'at

he morning service at the Unitarian
hurch.
"The' Wonderful Growth of God's
hurch," is the subject of the sermon
hosen by Rev. C. A. Brouer of St.
aul's Lutheran church. The first
ervice will be held at 9:30 o'clock.
t 10:30 o'clock the Bible school will
ave its regular meeting. The Eng-
sh service wil be held at 11:30

MICHIGAN M E N
ARE IN DEM AND
(Special to The Summer Daily)
Lima, Ohio, July 29-Michigan Law
school alumni form . substantial re-
sources for. bpnch material in Lima,
Ohio, according to appointments made
within the last three years in the city's
criminal court. Two graduates of the
University of Michigan's Law school
have been picked from the list of men
from Dean Bates's institution. The
first was Ernest M. Notkins, '12L, who
was succeeded by a graduate of West-
ern Reserve, who in turn gave way to
Benjamin Motter, '16-18L.
WALTER WESBROOK
SETS HIGH RAING
Former Varsity Captain Listed Seven-
th Among Collegiate Net'
Men1
WILLIAMS OF YALE RANKED
BEST COLLEGE NET PLAYER
Walter Wesbrook, former coach and
also captain of Michigan's Varsity ten-
nis team, and who recently displayed
spectacl ar form in the national cham-
pionship tournament, has been ranked
seventh'in the rating of college play-
ers who conpeted in the national in-
tercollegiates this year.
Wesbrook, during his collegiate car-
eer, held the title of Conference cham-
pion, and was also several times cham-u
pion of the state of Michigan and of
the city of Detroit. In the recent in-#
tercollegiate meet, he was defeated in
a close match by. Wray Brown of
Washington University,' who in turn
lost to Lucien Williams, of Yale, in the
finals. Brown is listed as number two.
Wesbrook is the only Wolv'erine
named on the list, no other players
being ranked in either the singles or
the doubles.£
(By Associated Press)
New York, July 29.-L. E. Williamsr
of Yale university, a Chicago boy, was
ranked as the leading college tennis
player of the year by a special com-
mittee of the United States Lawn Ten-
nis association, which announced its
,ratings today.
Phil 'Neer and James Dazies, of Le-
land Stanford university are ranked
number one as doubles players.
KNOW' YTOUR, UNIERSITY
Since 1852, when the University ob-
servatory was founded, it has grown
rapidly and improved in many ways.
The principal instruments during its
first years were the meridian circle,N
which was used for the exact determ-
ination of star positions, and a 12-inch
reflector, then one of the large teles-
copes of the world.l
An opportunity to observe the chang-t
es and most recent apparatus will be
afforded students of the Summer ses-
sion on Monday, Tuesday and Wed-
nesday evenings of this week when the7
observatory will be open to visitors.
ENROLLMENT APPLICATIONS
ABOVE LAST YEAR'S FIGURE1
Applications for freshman enroll-]
ments for next fall are still consider-
ably ahead of the figure recorded ato
this time last year, according to Reg-
istrar Arthur G. Hall. Registrar Hall,

in addition to receiving the applica-
tions of prospective students, is read-
ing proof on the University announce-{
ments for the year 1922-23.
Dr. Hall is convalescing from an op-
eration performed last spring, and al-
though he has been confined to his
home during the greater part of the
summer, he has kept in touch with
Uniyersity. affairs.
Snow Falls In Pennsylvania
-Scranton, Pa., July 29.-Snow fell
during a storm which swept the 'Upper
Lackawana Valley last night, destroy-
in thousands of dollars' worth of
crops.
Horizon" will be the- theme of Rev.
R. Edward Sayles' sermon at this
cnrvint -r N-nrii R Oh-mm

SU MMER SCHOOL REGISTRY SHOWS
SLIGHT INCREASE OVE[RLAST YEAR

1922 Session Has Total of 2,803 Stu-
dents, Nine More Than That
of 1921
MICHIGAN RANKS FIFTH IN
STANDING OF UNIVERSITIES
Twenty-eight hundred and three stu-
dents are enrolled in the Summer ses-
sion of the University. This figure
was given out from the office of Dean
Edward H. Kraus, following the com-
pletion of enrollment in the second
term of the Law school and the eng-
ineering camp.
This year's figure barely exceeds
last summer's total of 2,794, by the
margin of nine enrollments, but al-
though there has been a decided fall-
ing off of students in the engineering
college and the Medical school, a con-
siderable gain has been made in the
School of Education, the Law school,
and in the Graduate school.
The gross total of registration for
the University was 2983, but this fig-
ure was modified by the substraction
of 180 duplications. These cases oc-
curred where some students' were tak-
ing work in more than one school or
college.
Officials of the Summer session early
last spring predicted an enrbllment of
approximately 3,000 s'tudents' The
overestimate at that time, is attributed
to the unfor een improved industrial
conditions, esecially within the state.
The reopening of factories and mills
throughout Michigan has offered work
at comparatively high wages for stu-
dents who during the past two sum-
mars were unable to find employment.
Michigan Ranks Fifth
Michigan occupies fifth place in
summer enrollments among the large
universities of the country, with Col-
umbia,' California, Wisconsin, and Min-
nesota in the first to fourth places, in
the order named.
In contrast to the University's at-
denance of 2,803, Pres. Charles Mc-
Kenney, of the State Normal college at
Ypsilanti, estimates that there are at
least 5,000 enrolled in the four norm-
al colleges of the state, and according
to figures received here, there are
about 12,000 students taking. summer
work in state colleges exclusive of the
University.
Many Attend Normal Schools
The normal schools at Kalamazoo,
Ypsilanti and Mt. Pleasant have e'
PROF. REED TO TALK ON
WCONITIONSIN .BELGIUM
"Belgium Today" will be the sub-
ject upon which Prof. T. H. Reed,
proessor of Municipal Government at
the University of California, who is
conducting courses in political sci-
ence here %during the 'Summer ses-
sion, will lecture at 5 o'clock, Aug.
1, in Natural Science auditorium.
Professor Reed recently returned
from Europe, where he was on leave
of absence all of the last academic
year. He traveled in England,
France, Italy and spent several months
in Belgium, where he had an excel-
lent opportunity of meeting the .lead-
ing figures in Belgian politics and
experts in public law. He is now
completing a brief book on the gov-
ernment and politics of Belgium bas-
ed on his observations there, which
will be published this winter in the
Govegnment Handbook series by
President Burrowes of the University
of. California and himself.
Being primarily interested in polit-
ical science, Professor Reed's lecture

will be largely concerned with po-
litical developments in Belgium, al-
though he will not neglect social and
economic conditions since the war.
Wesleyan Guild Holds Social
Approximately 100 people were pre-
sent at the social held last evening at
the Wesleyan Guild house for Method,
ist students in the Summer session.
Several musical selections were rend.
ered by Ruby Green, '24, and A. K,
Merrigan. Peanut hunts and other

rollments of 1,800, 2,500, and 1,750 re-
spectively. Summer session- officials
point out that the smalled state insti-
tutions, although their curricula are
limited, offer a six week summer
course at a cost of $5.00, to the stu-
dent, while the University fee is $30.00.
Tlie enrollments °of the normal schools
has increased substantially since 1908,
when they became degree conferring
institutions, by virtue of state legisla-
tion.
Comparative figures below, show
the gains and losses in the various
schools and colleges of the Univer-
sity:'

3 5 9 STATE MEN IN
NEW "WHO'SWHO"
Life records of the achievements of
the leading engineers of the country,
are contained in a new book, "Who's
Who in Engineering," by the John W.
Leo ard compay of New York, a copy
of Which was received yesterday by
Dean Edward H .Kraus of the Sum-
mer session. The book was compiled
of personal questionnaires sent to the
subjects, and the author excuses any
ommissions'°which may be discovered
in stating that some of the blanks
which were forwarded were never re-
turned to the publisher.
Three hundred and fifty-nine engin-
eers in the state are listed in the vol-
ume, but the index is not so arranged
that the number of University of Mich-
igan graduates, may be determined
without canvassing each individual
name in'the lists. Ann Arbor has 38
names, composed largely of Univer-
sity faculty members.
P A G
T E .

I.

I

U nlol
RNTII

"

HOOVER SAYS F]
CONFINED TO
4UES'I

New Government Fue
Aupervise All Moi

1921
Literary college..........1182
Colleges of Engineering
and Architecture.........655
Medical school ...........312
College of Pharmacy . . ....26
Law school ..............'152
Graduate school .......... 412
School of Education'...... 83
Library methods ..........57
Biologi l station.........36
Public ealth and Nursing. 37
Totals ....... ...........2952
Less Duplicates ..........158,
Totals...............2794

1922
1152
523
231
22,
1p87
480
229'
83
50,
26
2983
f 180,
2803

(By Associated :
Washington, D. C., Jul
of emergency coal disti
dividual consumers is e
hands of stare authoriti
railway coal, Secretary
man of the federal coa
announced tonight. Th
ernment, he stated, wil
tivities in coal distribut

Life in Peril, Premier Leaves
to Unveil War 'Mem-
orial

Paris1 Principals embraced

GERMAN MONARCHISTS
TO BE LEADERS

SAID
OF PLOT

SHAKESPEAREAN PLAYERS,
ARE OF H IG6H CALIBER

COMPANY WHICH WILL
HERE IS REPUTED TO]
AMONG FOREMOST

PLAY
BE

"We have reason to believe that
this company will be as good as the
best of the Ben Greet companies,
Prof. Morris P. Tilley, of the English1
department, said in speaking of the
Shakespearean Playhouse company
which comes to Ann Arbor the end of1
this week.{
The Shakespearean Playhouse com-
pany, founded by Frank McEntee in
1918, is an association of )artists and
experienced actors for the production,1
not only of Shakespearean drama, but
also of the best modern plays. Both
Frank McEntee and Miss Elsie Kearns
have played here before with Ben
Greet companies. Mr. McEntee took'
no less than 75 different Shakespear-
ean roles during his association withI
that company. Miss Kearns has just
completed a transcontinental tour with
Walter Hampden.
The plays which will be given here
in the theater to be built on the cam-
pus are "The Taming of the Shrew"
at 8 o'clock, Thursday night; "Thew
Pigeon" Friday night; "Twelfth Night"
at 4 o'clock Saturday afternoon, and
Barrie's play "The Admirable Mr.
Crichton." This is a change from the7
time stated In the entertainment pro-
gram of the Summer session.
A stage, 20 by 40 feet, will be built
back of the President's tennis cou'rt.
Here natural scenery of greeni'boughs
will be used. The 'benches, seating'
1,000, will be brought out from Tap-
pan hall and the whole theater will
be enclosed by canvas walls. Special
lighting facilities will be arranged for
the evening performances. In case of
rain, arrangements will have been
made to continue the plays In Univer-
sity hall auditorium. First floor rooms
of Tappan hall will be used as the
players' dressing rooms. Many of the
properties have been rented from
down townstores and from the Uni-
versity.
Tickets are on sale at Wahr's book-
store. Reserved seats are' 75 cents,
general admission is 50 cents. Four
tickets may be purchased for $2.25,
the price of three, if four are bought
at once. In the past, tickets have been
sold out before. the performances.
Many people come from Detroit, Ypsi-
lanti, and other nearby places to see
these out-of-door plays.
Griffith New Big Ten Leader
Chicago, July 29.-Major John L.
Griffith, founder of the Drake relay
and head of the department of physic-
al education at the University of Il-
linois. tonight was chosen commis-

(By Associated Poss)
Paris, July 29.-Unperturbed by the
information made public yesterday
that an 'attempt was being plotted in
German monarchist circles to assas-
sinate him, Premier Poincare is plan-'
ning to carry out his riginal inten-
tion of participating in the unveiling
of a war memorial in the Argonne
tomorrow near his country bome at
Sampigny.
Before leaving , Paris tonight, the
premier discussed the alleged plot and
the precautions considered advisable
with the new prefect of police, M. Nau-
din, and with Minister of the Interior
Maunoury. The reported plot is un-
derstood to be the ,work of the mon-
archist association known .as the'
"Council," encouraged by its success
in planning the removal of former
Minister of Finance Ersberger and
former Foreign Minister Rathenau,
the association decided to extend its
scope beyond the German frontier and
selected Premier Poincare as the firs't
victim.
The information that reached the
French foreign office yesterday, it was
made known, was from the Belgian
government; not through the Berlin
police, a's first was stated.
Oratory Classes
To Pu,.resen t Plays
Under the direction of Prof. R. D. T.
Hollister, of the department of public
speaking, the class in play production
will give two plays August 10 and 11
in University Hall. Israel Zangwill's
"The Melting Pot," and Sheridan's
"The Rivals," will be given on these
dates.
The cast includes instructors of play
production in other colleges and high
schools, writers, dramatists, profes-
sional motion picture and stage artists
and directors who are attending the
Summer session of the University.
PROF. W. W. SLATER TO TALK OI

trations plan of coal dis
Hoover explained, have b
icated to the governors
who are to adopt plans
in co-operation with th
committee. Distribution
added, vary in different
states such as in New
middle Atlantic, South
West and Northcrn lake
there can be no unifoi
while the intermountait
states are able to look af
es and "are not embraced
ministration."
Conservation is Nt
Conservation of the
supply within its bound
necessary, he declared,
ing concerns along the
board have been asked to
only to the next port of c
August 1 to require for
bunker 'broad for the rc
though coal is cheaper
ports than abroad, he ac
not be spared out of the
adian consumers also, 1
been warned to Aimpor
abroad for their use.
Price Levels Rema
Coal exports, he asser
held to a minimum duri
gency, no priorities bean;
the movement of coal to
can supply themselves.
Price levels will be mi

coal aun
mission

be available onl
fair prices. He
newly appointed
tor, is to superv
between the stal
of handling. coal
sible to the inter
mission will be
from Washington
terstate commeri

_"WHAT IS SCIENCE" TOMORROW
"What is Science?" will be the topic
of a lecture to be delivered by Prof.
W. W. Slater, of the 'physics depart-
ment at 5 o'clock tomorrow afternoon
in the Natural Science auditorium.
Professor Slater's discussion does not
arise from any one particular science
nor is it concerned wholly with the
definition of science. He will, how-
ever, attempt to define his topic and
will subsequently expand upon it.
Oil Squatters Make Trouble
Washington, July 29.-Acting Sec-
retary Roosevelt today ordered Major
General Lejeune, commandant of the
marine corps; to send one officer and
three or four enlisted marines into
the tea pot dome naval oil reserve,

'ge Backhurst, of 411 Saints
ooklyn, will deliver the
the morning service at St.
Episcopal church.
[cal program at the First
trch this morning will in-
anthem, "Hark, Hark My
be sung by the quartette

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