100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 29, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


V'ummrr

FRALLY FAIR
TOI)AY

It

ti

DAY AND N.

3 2 A N } R O , M C I A , S A U D Y U Y 2 . 1 2

A

32

ANN' ARBOR,. MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 29, 1922

,. _, -rrc&

ERNOR, HARDIN6
ODDS5 ON STATE
NE STRIKE ISUE
01DENT'S ANSWER DRAWS
SHARP CRITICISM FROM
GROESBECK
IANDS AID TO SETTLE
ICHIGAN COAL CRISIS
People Are Becoming Impatient
of Legislation to Bring
Strike to End
BULLETIN
shington, July 2S. -President
ng today forwarded an answer
e challenge of Governor Grocs.
of Miehiban, for governnient
i in the coal strike. The con-
of the answer wer'e not given

____... --. ..._.- -- - - --__ - a

_I

S UPERINTENDANTS
TAKE BALL GAMEI

Defeat for the faculty of the School
of Educatipn was the result of the
game played yesterday afternoon at
Ferry field between the faculty and
the superintendents attending the
Summer session.
The game closed with' a score of six
to one in favor of the superintendents.
Following the game lemonade was
served thirsty players by women of
the educational school. About 109
persons attended the get-together. The
next game will be played on Thurs-
day, Aug. 3, at Ferry field.

AD jp[col.9MINISTRATOR OF
CONFIDENCE WAS EXPRESSED AT
WHITE HOUSE AS OFFICE
1 MADE OPERATIVE

I

'SEASHORE TESTS FOR MUSICAL ABILITY
OFFERED BY PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT

PHYSIQUE -SHOWS
TE&C HER'S ME-RIT'
Outward Qualities as Well as Mental
Development Shuld be Scrut-
inized, Says R .G. Jones
CILEVELA ND EDUCATOR LAYS
STRESS ON 6001D PERSONALITY
Measurement of the 4uman qualities

WAS PURCHASE AGENT
FOR RAILROADS IN WAR
New Official Becomes Administrative
Members of Committee on Fuel
Distribution

Prof. C. . Seashore's tests of mus-
ical capacity will be given to all those
who wish to take them at 2 o'clock
Tuesday afternoon and at 7:30 o'clock
Wednesday evening in Natural _Sci-
ence auditorium. The tests are be-
ing conducted under the auspices of
the psychology department of the
University and those in charge are
anxious to secure as many subjects
as possible.
The tests are conducted 'y means
of scientifically prepared phonograph
records which aim to discover the
subject's innate capacity in each of
five traits--sense of pitch, sense of
time, intensity of sound, consonance
PROFIPOILLOCK TO
TEACHIN HAWAII
Will Leave August Sixth to Serve
Year as Exchange Profes-
sor
TO DO SPECIAL RESEARCH
WORK ON MARINE PLANT$

and tonal memory. To every subject
will be given a statement of "his
scores and relative capacity along
each of these. lines. Each individual
needs to come but once, either Tues-
day afternoon or Wednesday evening,
for a two hour period. '
HOLLISTER'S CLASS'
TO PRESENT DRAMAS

Associated Press)

R [ .[ P OUE A D Y F O R S CI R

g, July 28.-A letter from Iwhich are manifested physically should

PLANS WILL-BE
UNION AND
MEET

ident Harding which declared in
t that the federal government is
erless to interfere with the hos-
attitude of tke national organiza-
of the United Mine Workers to-
3 independent local agreements;
at present nothing ^an be done
pt to enable men, willing'to work,
ork in safety; and that the big is-
in the coal strike dispute is na-
i1 dictation '"unhesiatingly as-
d by the mine workers" which
be taken care of by legislation,
y drew sharp disagreement from
rnor Qroesbeck.
e President's letter was in re-
to a telegram sent by Governor
sbeck last week, when he inform-
he President that he was asking
L. Lewis, president of the Unit-
/ineworkers, to grant Michigan
rs permission to enter agree-
s independently of their national
ation and return to work.
day' the governor answered the
ident's letter by writing that he
. not concede that the federal
rnment has not the power "to
-ct our citizens from the embar-
ng situation that faces us."',
NS ENTRANTS IN
HST LAP OF SUMMER
SESSION TOUINMENT

be made in selecting a teacher, is the
opinion of R. G. Jones, superintendent
of public schools in Cleveland, ex-
pressed in his lecture on "Building ofj
Personnel in Education" given in Na-
tural sience auditorium yesterday af-
ternoon., Photographs, although often
sufficient to prevent employment, sel-
dom' are sufficierlt to warrant employ-
ment; the teacher must make personal
application for the position.
Good Physique Important
Mr. Jones assumed that the selection
of strong teachers is a major consider-
ation. We can improve the- system by
having the technique of measuring
people, employing our sense of values,
not relying upon the judgment of oth-
ers in mnaking a selection, learning
where the best teachers are to be
found, and organizing a plan that will
provide a reserve list of available
people.
In giving a general estimate of the
characteristics of a desirable teach-
er, he said that the teacher sghould be
a normal, wholesome individual, ob-
servant, and with imagination as well
as reason. Without imagination the
teacher is practically helpless to make
progress'with the pupils in any way.
The teacher should be well educated.
industrious, patient, and with ade-
quate professional training. In re-
gard to character, Mr. Jones stressed
the necessity for honesty, dependabil-
ity, sincerity, and courage.f
Features Dlselose Traits
"We are all constantly engaged in
measuring our fellow workers and
all with whom we come in contact.
Our standards vary, but our general-
estimates are quite in common," said
Mr. Jones. A few of the physical
measurements and the qualities which
they denoted were cited. Good. health
furnishes working power and indicates
a good disposition, the eyes indicate
nervd force, each feature of the face
and head betrays something of the
character of the individual, and a
harsh 'or mellow voice tells its own
story as a rule. An important point
for the applicant to remember is that
dress 'should be regarded as an in-
vestment rather than a luxury, the

(By Associated Press)
Washington, July 28.- Herbert B.
Spencer, former vice-president of the
Southern railway and general pur-
chasing agent for the war time rail-
road administration tonight was ap-
pointed federal coal administrator for
the duration of the present strike em-
ergency by President Harding.
Mr .Spencer becomes administrative
member of the committee, which will
control 'distribution of available coal
supplies on a priority basis to es-
sential industries and utilities.
With the announcement of creations
of the office of coal administrator, con-
fidence was expressed at the White
House that production of coal, regard-
less of rail and mine strikers, event-
ually would' be increased to the point
where it, would be adequate. for the
country's needs.
President Harding felt so assured
of this point, it was said, that he
contemplated no further move in the
coal strike situation. The governors
of 23 states, Mr. Hoover announced,
have undertaken to erect the necessary
administration to control profiteering
and 'distribution of coal within the
borders.
States which have reported steps to
set up this machinery include: Ohio,
Indiana,, Illinois, Michigan, Wiscon-
sin, North Dakota, Minnesota, Maine,
Massacuhsetts ,New Hampshire, Con-
nocticut, Rhode Island, New York,
New Jersey, Maryland, Pennsylvania,
West Virginia, Iowa, Oklahoma, Flor-
ida, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Louis-
iana.
APPROACHES CLOSE
O F 'I iTIALSEASO

Tickets will be on sale at Wahr's
bookstore within the next few days
for, the "Melting Pot," which is to be
given by the class in play production
Thursday evening, Aug. 10, in Univer-
sity Hall.
Members of the same class will
present "The Rivals" in University
hall auditorium on Aug. 11. Prof. JR.
T. D. Hollister of the department of
public speaking says that these plays
will be among the finest student pro-
ductions given here. Over half of the
class is made up of graduate stu-
dents. Many of the players are teach-
ers of public speaking in schools and
colleges all over the country.
In addition to these plays presented
to the public, six one act plays will
be given this summer as class work.

Prof. James B. Pollock of the botany
department, will sail Aug. 6 from San
Francisco for the Hawaiian islands,
where he will teach during the com-
ing year as an exchange professor in
the University of Hawaii. Prof. H. F.
Bergman of that university will be
here next year to take charge of Pro-
fessor Pollock's- classes.
In addition to teaching his classes
which will be practically -the same'
as those which he has here, Professor
Pollock expects to do special observa-
tion of microscopic marine plants
there which deposit lime on the coral
reefs in addition to the deposits made
by coral.
Professor Pollock says that the con-
stant temperature of the climate fac-
ilitatesthe growing of practically ev-
ery kind of plant -
Due to the long continued efforts of
American missionaries the islands are
almost completely Americanized al-
though the population is composed al-
most entirely of Orientals.
The curriculum in sciences of the
University of Hawaii, according to
Professor Pollock is unusually com-
plete. The Hawaiians lay much stress
on the growth and milling of sugar
cane, offering several courses in eng-
iieering and agriculture for students
in this field.
The university is well equipped with
athlt tic facilities, including a baseball
.and football field and a newly con-
structed $20,000 swimming pool.
'Professor Pollock expects to re-
turn to Ann Arbor sometime next sum-
mer.
Last Concert To
fe Given Aug. 2,

EARLY SETTLEME!
PREDICTED BY HA
Will Thresh Out All Con
Issues In New York a
Chicago Tuesday

TO' APEARHERE AUG. 3
Reserved seat tickets go on sale be-
ginning Monday at Wahr's bookstore
for the out-of-door performances, of
-the Shakespeare Playhouse company
of New York City. The tEnglish de-
partment which has brought the play-
ers here has been insistent that the
prices be kept low: This is in order
that students be given an opportunity
to see the best drama well presented
at moderate cost. Reserved seats are
75 cents, general admission being 50
cents. A reservedseat ticket for all
four of the plays tto be presented is-
$2.25, which means that four seats
are sold for the price of three when
four are bought at one time,. This is
the ordinary price of-one seat to a
performance of this kind at a theater.
Fred McEntee, manager of the
Shakespeare Playhouse company, is
coming to Ann Arbor without a guar-
antee owing to his experience in the
past when the summer crowds hate
always been large, more desiring seats'
than could be accommodated. It is
this fact together with the enthusiastic
welcome that companies in the past
received which make the players who
have been here before wish to come
back.
"The Taming of the Shrew" will be
given at 8 o'clock Thursday evening
in the campus theater which is to be
built between the Library and the
Museum.
Galsworthy's "Pigeon," will be giv-
en at 3:30 o'clock Friday afternoon.
This- play as well as "The Admirable
Mr. Critchon," one of James M. Bar-
ries plays which is to be given by'
the company Saturday afternoon, Aug.
5, have proven among the most popu:
lar modern plays, according to news-
paper reports in large' cities of the
East where they have been .played.
"The Admirable Mr. Critchon" has
been screened under the name "Male
and Female."
The Playhouse company will pre-
ent "Twelfth Night" at 8 o'clock next
Friday night.
Tpe manager of the company as well
as one of the players, is well known
to Ann Arbor audiences, as he kplayed
here with the Ben Graet companies.
Miss Elsie Kearns has also been here,
before as she was formerly a mem-
ber one of the Ben -Greet companies
as well as having recently completed
a transcontinental tour with Walter
Hampden.

(By Associated Press)
Washington, July 28.-Propo
settling the railroad strike, dr
by President Harding and rei
ing the conclusionrs reached -
after th'e extended conferences
past 48 hours with labor lead
railway executives will be p
ed to separate meetings of re:
tatives of the two groups nexi
day-the railroad managers m
in New York and the employ
voys in Chicago.
Details of the plan or plan
still withheld today, . but Pr
Harding said prospects were
for an early settlement of the
versy which'has threatened to
the nation's railway system.
jor section in the President's
ment was understood to'invo]
seniority issue, which was sa
ther to be the only section
plan to have been identified as
the controversial issues betw
railroads and their workmen.
Differ/in Issues
Another section would conc
right of the ~strikers to a rel
before the railroad labor bo
the wage issue, and another
bind the railroads to set up r
adjustment boards,, while a
would require abandonment 6
roads of contracts with "o
shops for repair work.
President Harding was und
to have -suggested a compron
the question of seniority rig
which all men "fired" since the
would-retain the, positions, the
ers regaining their former pri
so as to rank just behind tb
who did not walk out July 1.
The strikers under the plan
return- to work at the scale
the board in' its decisions of
which precipitated the strik
without prejudice to either sid
the matter was brought up f
hearing.
B. M. Jewell, president of tb
way employes department a
American Federation of Labc
international officer of the, r
unions on strike, left.-Washing
night for Chicago, announcin
the general strike committee o
organization would convene I
city Tuesday to consider the
dent's suggestions. T. DeWiti
ler, chairman of the associat
railway exe utives and 'pr
spokesman of the managemen
nounced last night that the exe
would meet in New York on th
for the same purpose.
To Formulate Programs
It is expected that prelimina
ferences will be held' by each
in the endeavor to formulate
grams for consideration by th
eral sessions. The general strik
mittees of the unions ordinaril
sist of a representaive of eac
In each railroad system whex
strike is in- effect.
It was understood that Se
Hoover. might attend the railw
ecutives' session in New York,
senting the administration ,and
was a possibility that Secretary
might attend the union nieetir
Davis left tonigbt* ftr Moos

EXAMINATIONS NEXT WEEK
COMPLETE WORK FOR
SUMMER SESSION

TOI

JALIFY SEVERAL
PLAYING FIRST'
ROUND

FORT

ennis results for the first round
Id be reported by -tonight, and
who have not played their sets
be' disqualified." This dictum
issued yesterday by Dr. George A.
director of the Summer session
is tournament. He said that no
s scheduled for the first round'
d be carried over into next week.
der this ruling Briscoe and Lin-
Zook and Lauder, Waltmire and
[s, singles, and Chesley-Herrick
Lincoln-Donaldson, doubles, will
iminated.
ose who have completed the first
I and qualified for the singles 1i
Ad are: Rufus vs. Brick, Tait vs.
es, Mildner vs. Immelman, Fern-
z vs. Harland, and Feldman vs.
Is. .Harland and Marais were
and did not play in the first

speaker- said.
Teachers differ in different parts of
the country almost as much- as they do
in different countries of the world. T
is difficult for the teacher trained
south of the Mason and Dixon line
to understand or comprehend the
northern requirements because the
professional training and experience
received in his locality have been so
limited,

Examinations the latter part of next
week will terminate the first season
of the new coaching school of the
School of Education. Members of the
staff agree that the school has proven
very interestin'g and profitable.
Eleven complete courses have been
offered, covering nearly all phases of
athletic and playground work, and
thorough work in gymnastic drills.
More than 9 men' representing 18,
states are registered for part or all
of the work offered, most of whom
are coaches at universities, colleges,
or high, schools. No university cred-
it is given for work in this depart-
ment bu,t it is planned to allow credit
next year for courses taken in the
coaching school. Officials believe that
this should swell the enrollment con-
siderably next season,
Thefaculty of the school consists of
12 men, all of whom, with the excep-
tion of Keene Fitzpatrick, of Prince-
ton university, are coninected with in-
tercollegiae athletics here. Two
courses in football are conducted by
Coach Yost and Elton lE. Wieman,
Varsity line coach. Track and ath-
letic training is taught by Keene
Fitzpatrick, William J. Fallon, Archie
Hahn, and Stephen J. Farrell. Dr.
George A. May is .in charge of gym-,
nastics and allied courses, while
courses in baseball and basketball are
given by Ray L. Fisher and Edwin
J. Mather, respectivgIy. Ellner D.
Mitchell, director of intramural ac-
tivities, gives courses in playground
and Boy Rcout activitie sandani-

Serving as a climax to the series
of Wednesday evening concerts which
have been given this summer by the
School of Music in Hill auditorium,,
the Summer Choral Union will give
Elgar's "Banner of St. George." Un-
der the direction of George Oscar
lBowen, head of the public school mus-
ic department of- the School of Music,
the Chotral Union has been practicing.
every Tuesday and Thursday evenings
during the Summer session.
Mrs. Leslie G. Lamborn, soprano, of
Royal Oak, has been secured as the
soloist for the concert. Mrs. Lamborn
was a student at the School of Music
a number of years ago and appeared
in a number of concerts during her
stay here.
Mrs. Emma Fischer-Cross, will also
appear as a piano- soloist. Mrs. Cross
is a former member !f the faculty
of the School of Music and will re-
turn to that faculty in the fall after
an absence of a number of years.
Students Build Dam Model
Members of the department of naval
architecture and- marine engineering

s, those qualifying for
d are: 'Pore and Walt-
Brick and Tait, and
derland, byes, vs. Mar-
nan.
who have qualified for,
d should play their sets
sible, according to Dr.{

Courses Close at Geology Camp
Courses at the -geological camp in
Kentucky will close this week. For
the past week members of the camp
have been doing geological work in
and around Knoxville, Tenn.
Sixty-five men have already been
registered for the second term at
Camp Davis. Courses in the second
term at the engineering camp will be-
.gin next week. '

PRINT 'WHO'S WHO' Ill., near Chicago.
OF ENGINEERING Apparently the P
als will go before
7- -ployes with the rE
A "Whio's WhQ in Engineering" has their international
just been published by the Leonard acceptance. It appe
Corporation of New York, who have the railroad execu
notified subscribers that the book is the same favorabl(
already in the mail and should be re- from their spokes.
ceived within a few days. President has seen

Pres.

were

I

3

'I

,r-

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan