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July 28, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-28

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ILLY FAIR
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DAY

AND NIGHT
SERTVICE

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31

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,FRIDAY, JULY 8, 1922

PRICK

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CHIGAN FUEL

SITUATION

ACU

Looms

Up

In 7ailroad Shopmen's

Strike

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i

I LEADERS AND PRESIDENT
-1 TO BE SUBMITTED TO EXECUTIVES

OF SETTLEMENT WITH-
D BY CONFEREES IN
WASHINGTON
LUTY CONSIDERED
BAR TO ARMISTICE
at in Controversy Gave Over,
Labor Federation Lead-
ers
3y Associated Press)
gton, July 27. - Tentative
for the settlement of the
hop men's strike were drawn
after a series of conferences
President Harding anti labor
aded by B. M. Jewell of the

Burns, vice-president of the sheet
metal workers,and Edward Evans,
vice-president of the brotherhood of
electrical workers, were In two meet-
ings with Mr. Jewell and the Presi-
dent, the last of which did not break
up until nearly 6 o'clock.
It was understood in Chicago when
the labor group left yesterday for the
capitol that they would return to-
night. The decision to extend their
stay was taken as another indication
that hopeful progress had been made
during the day.
HEALTH SERYICE TOo BE
NNIWQUARTERS SOON
MINOR ILLNESSES TO BE CARED
FOR IN FORMER CHILDREN'S
'BUILDING

LEONARD-TENDLER
BATTLE TO A DRAW
(Special to The Summer Daily)
Jersey City, N. J., July 27.-Benny
Leonard and Lew Tendler fought a
12-round, no-decision bout here to-
night, in which honors slightly favor-
ed the champion in the final rounds.
Newspaper men at the ring differed
to some extent in their opinions. The
majority appeared to favor Leonard
at the end of the bout, although some
declared for 'a draw. Tendler had the
better of the first five rounds, but
Leonard finished strong.
Leonard was asked why he did not
knock out Tendler and replied with a
blood-smeared grin, "Southpaws are
hard to solve."
Approximately 75,000 persons saw
the bout. The gate receipts were -in
excess of $450,000.y'
TO REPREENT U,S.
AT WORLD. ROAD MEET,
UNITED STATES ONLY POWER NOT
AFFJLIATED WITH INTER.NA-
TIONAL CONGRESS

GUITAR
ELTY

AND SAXAPHONE, NOV.
DANCE, SONGS, WELL
RECEIVED
/

CIRCUS LIFEJ
zz-TH SP OT LIGHT

GUN AND BLADE
PLANS PICNIC AUG. 5
The Gun and Blade club is planning
to hold a picnic Saturday, Aug. 5, at
Groome's beach, Whitmore lake. The
party will leave the Michigan Union
at 1 o'clock. Each couple is asked
to bring their lunch in a basket, to
tag it, and to leave it at the Union by
11 o'clock. The picnic will be -held at
Groome's beach, Whitmore lake.
The entertainments planned are:
The nail driving contest for women,
a cracker eating contest for women,;
baseball-the married women yersus
the unmarried women, a new donkey
race, horseback baseball, and baseball.
Every one is invited to join in the pie
eating contest.
Transportation, ice cream, and
drinks are included in the price of
$1-0-.

3 understood that the suggest-
s for settlement-details of
-ere withheld by those partici-
ti its formation,-would be
d later to executives of the
enority Last Obstacle
ttlement proposals apparently
erence to the seniority issue
t was generally agreed was
remaining bar to conclusion
ailroad war, or at least of an
e in the struggle.
i the railroad executives ac-
plans, it was said, a rehear-
ssues which led to the strike
e held before the railroad
>ard and all other questions
adjudicature through such a
nig.
bor union officials, through B.
11, president of the railway
es' section of th'e American
:m of Labor, decIred they
t comment upon the substance
discussion with the President
hat every point in the strike
rsy had been gone over.
eaders to Extend Stay
Johnson, president of the In-
al Association of Machinists,
nklin, president of the boiler-
M. S. Ryan, president of the
, G, Healy, president of the
y firemen and oilers, James

With the beginning of the. fall ses-
sion, the University Health service
will be housed iV? neV quarters. This
change was made possible this spring
when the union of the Medical schools
made the children's annex building
of the Homoeopathic hospital, Wash-
tenaw and Geddes avenues, available.
The buildings and grounds depart-
ment is now .engaged in making the
necessary changes in ths building, in-
to which the Health service will move
next month.
Facilities will be greatly increased
by this transfer, according to Dr.
Warren E. Forsythe, director of the
Health service. The dispensary will
be downstairs, while the upper floor
will be occupied by bed patients.
"This opens a new phase of the Uni-
versity Healith service," said Dr. For-
sythe. "Minor illnesses, those which
require merely a little care, and nose
and throat operations, will be cared
for by the Health service Instead of
sending those acases to the alreadyf
overcrowded hospital."

North Pole Discoveror,
Eulogized In H o b bs Article

Prof. Arthur H. Blanchard of the'
highway engineering' and tr'ansport
department, has been chosen to be the
United States representative to the
fourth convention of the Permanent
International Associatio of Road con-
resses next May in Seville, Spain.
This association wasorganized in
1908, with headquarters at Paris. Its
membership includes representatives
of governments, corporations and in-
dividual members. The object' of the'
association is to promote good roads
and highway transport throughout the
world.
May Name U.' S. Commissioners
ThdUnited States is the only world
power not affiliated with, the associa-
tion. Professor Blanchard and others
have tried repeatedly since 1910 to
bring the matter before Congress, but
various obstacles have arisen to pre-
vent is consideration. They have in-
terested Senator DuPont of Delaware,
and it is probable that the -question of
a subsidy grant for the support of Am-
erican commissioners will soon be put
up to Congress. This done, the n'ext
road congress will be heldin the Un-
ited States in 1926.
According to,. the plan of the con-
gress, topics are assigned tohbe re-
ported upon by delegates from the
various countries represented. Pro-
fessor Blanchard, as the United States
representatives, has charge of the ap-
pointment of 82 of the reporters-.
They will prepare papers on the
topics assigned them., and will turn
them in to Professor Blancard, who
compiles them. As. reporters, it is not
necessary that they should be present'
at the congress, although about half
have signified their intentions of go-
ing.
Ten Michigan Men Named
Ten Michigan ren, three of whom
are members of the University facul-
ty, have been named as reporters.
Professors Blanchard and H. E. Riggs,
of the department of civil engineering,
will have topics under the head of
"The Development of Motor Trans-
port," and Prof. Herschel F. Smith, of
the highway engineering and motor
transport department, will report on
a subdivision of "The Problem of
Traffic."
Professor Blanchard was connect-
ed with the Permanent International
commission in 1910, having his office
at Paris for eight months. He was
present at the second congress in
Brussels in 1910, and at the third
in London in 1913. It is because he '
has been so closely connected with

NONSENSE NO VEL PLAY
AFFORDS A-MUSEMENT
"Five Minutes Before the Big Show"
Gives Sidelight on Circus
Life
(By W. C. Trotter)
Humor, pathos, bathos, joy, terpsi-
chore, jazz, glimpses of circus life, all
vied, for honors on the program of the
Summer Spotlight, presented last
night by campus performers -in Hill
auditorium. Seven acts there were,
seven acts chuck full of unbroken in-
terest and variety. Two-thirds of the
large assembly hall was filled long
before the curtain rose for the first
act.
Tang and Tavares, guitar, artists,
first appeared on the stage. After two.
selections they were joined by. Max
Shaffer, '23E, and the trio played two
pieces, as well as furnishing the ac-
compa'niment for the quartette
The second act consisted of saxa-
phone selections, ably presented by
"Ted" Rhodes, '24,taccompanied by
Reule' Kenyon on the piano.
An adaptation of the South Ameri-
can tango, the creation of Gordon
Wier, '24, of opera fame, was the
third feature- Wier and Winifred
Smeaton, '24, danced in costume, and
werea tcalled back by the audience to
*repeat' their, act.
"Libby" Holman proved' a front row
favorite with her clever little songs,
one of which, "Prisms, Plums, and
Prune," is an original composition,
writen by herself.
"$99:90", an adaptation by AlWeeks
o fone of Stephen Leacock's "Nonsense
Novels", afforded much amusement.
"Some Dark Stuff", featuring James
H. Tuttle, '23E, assisted by. Carl-
Weinman, '24, was a blackface act,
with the usual line of patter and
song.
The last act, "Five Minutes Before
the Big Show", was elaborate and
showed considerable effort. Whether
the side show barker, with his mar-
velous feat of hypnotism, or the band
"line", was the most conspicuous
feature of the act is a uestion. The
fat lady, the hula-hula girl, the wild
man, and the thin man were all pre-
sented in true side show fas'hion.
KNOW YOUR UNITERSILTY
More than a million dollars was
spent on the building of the Michigan
Union, which was organized and in-
corporated under the laws of the state
of Michigan in 1904. The equipment
of the building which cost $200,000 is
not counted in the above. This is said
to be the largest and most fully equip-
ped men's club in the world.
UNION' SU1M11ER SESSION
DANCES PROVE POPULAR
Union dances are proving popular
with Summer. session students, ac-
cording to members of the dance com-
mittee. Although the Friday night at-
tendance is not as large as during the
regular session, more tickets have
been sold at each successive dance.
Pa* Wilson's orchestra Is furnish-
ing the dance music,'featured by "har.
mony" vocal accompaniment.
Bates Leaves for San Francisco
Dean Henry M. Bates, of the Law

SEND TOOPS AND THERE
WI L L 1EABTTLE, SAY
ARMED KENTUCKY MINERS
SHOTS FIRED -AT WORKERS. AT
MOUNAIN MINE; MAYOR MAY
CAL LROOS
S . -
(By Associated Press),
Middlesboro, Ky., July 27. - One
miner was wounded and several oh-
ers narrowly escaped Injury at Bry-
son Mountain, Tenn., today when a
party of alleged strike srympathizers
ferd a fusilage of shots at them as
the miners were enroute to work, it
was learned here today.
The entire territory is reported to
be in a high pitch of excitement as
the result of an armed miners' pa-
rade through the mine region last
night and today.
A majority of the workers are leav-
ing the camp, it was reported. Min-
ers declared if state troops are sent
here there will be a battle. ''hey claim
they are amply supplied with arms
and ammunition.
The Bryson Mountain mine- is con-
trolled by Mayor. J. H. Keeney. He
said he had not asked. for stte
troops, but would do so
The first outbreak of strikers oc-
curred here three weeks ago and'
conditions since have been unsettled.
Bryson Mountain is just across the
state line in a heavily wooded region
in a rough country.
With Playmaker
Big and little, well and sick children,
all over Ann Arbor joined in the
"Carnival of Fun" yesterday while
Dr. E'mmett D. Angell, here nder the
auspices of the Times-News, conuet-e
ed his "health and happiness" games
for dhildren.
The children's ward in University
hospital was full of excitement early
in the morning for that was Dr. An-
gell's first stop. Those who could
get up were in their chairs an hour
early and the others were wide awake
ready to "just pretend" that they
were playing the games which Dr. An-
gell taught them.
Later in the morning there was a
"playfest" in West park, where ap-
proximately 150 children had gathered
for lively out of door sports.
Mothers and fathers sat ardund
at Ferry field enjoying the games that
were being played ot in the field,
which was, turned over to Dr. Angell
and the children for the afternoon.
Coaches 'from the University coaching
school were at the field to study Dr.
Angell's methods as well as to help
with the big games.
The final filay session took place

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Lansing, July 27"-"Strong
mental action" to stop profitee
to apportion available coal
was advised by the Michiga
Utilities Commission in a
to the Interstate Commerce"i
sion today, acknowledging th
appeal for~ co-opera tion in it,
to solve the coal problem. T
gram follows:
Vould Stop Profiteerli
The Michigan Public Utiliti
mission will be pleased to as
in every way possible. Howe
tion is necessary.; In spite o
ises made to the public -tha
would be no profiteering, soft
risen to $12 & ton.
Michigan public utilities, m
plants, state 'nstitutions and
eral public face an immine
shortage. The situation is
and the public critical.
It is our opinion that stro
ernmental action should be
immediately. Profiteering. sh
stopped and such coal as is a
should be properly apportion
termined efforts, should be
undo damage caused by unji
delays.
Seek Hoover's Aid
The telegram was signed
uel Odell, chairman of the st
mission.
The state government is
co-operate to the fullest ext
the federal fuel distribution
tee, Governor Groesbeck assu
retary Hoover in a telegram
night in -reply to the secreta
quest that state organization
up to work with the federal
The governor also asked S
Hoover to use his influence '
L. Lewis, president of the
union, toward obtaining the
consent for' Michigan miner
sume work under the old wa
pending settlement of the
strike.

FEH THAT ST
INSTITUTIONS
BE WITHO UT
LANSING OFFICIALS I
CONDITION TO WHI'
HOUSE CHIEFS
LEADERS SAY U.S. M
TAKE ACTION AT
Profiteering and Unfair Me
Distribution Prove
Serious
(By Associated Press
Washington, July 27.-Car
state labor commissioner to
gan, and Perry Ward, dept
missioner, informed Secretar
bor Davis -to.day that the co,
age in their state was so ac
there appeared to be a likelil
the state institutions shortly
find themselves without fue
Thy two MVihigan official
some time in conferenc w
Davis detailing the strike siti
Michigan.
To' Confer with Lewi
Commissioner Young and hi.
said that they had come to I
ton in the belief that John I
president of the United Min
ers, would be here, in order I
might ,,consult with him co
probable action by Michigan
to meet the situation. AftE
conference with Mr.' Davis,
officials left for Philadelphia
Mr. Lewis.

the annals of the A
can Geographers,;
eprint' of Prof. W
emoir of Robert Ed'
t arctic explorer,
orth Pole, who die
attainment of the
geographic pole,f
turies the great gc
was an echieveX
ill others in genera
which aroused the
the American peo
ree," began Profess
e sturdy American
fter devoting a li
nment of this goa
ao fault of his own,
i of his immediate
im of his country

association former sought to signalize every ap-
comes the pearance of Peary for a public address
illiam, H. by his own presence in the same vic-
win Peary. inity where, from the local stage and
discoverer often through the local press, he
d in Feb., launched his torrent of abuse with
such vigor as to supply all needed ad-
e earth's vertisement for his own further ap-
for nearly pearances. Only when the great ex-
oal of ex- plorer was stricken down by the ill-
ment sur- ness which led up to his death did
al interest this profitable career of infamy come
patriotic to an end-whereupon the experienced
ple in no fakir deserted the stage for other now
sorVHobbs. more profitable fields."
who suc- Peary will also be remembered as
fe-time to the man who made such extensive ex-
al should, plorations of the Island of Greenland
have been and who introduced the Peary system
reward in "of -supporting parties which eventu-
and made ally conquered both the northern and
k_ through the southern pole."
which his- Began as Government Draftsman
tstanding In outlining the important events
ion." of Peary's life, Professor Hobbs point-
k ed out that the explorer was, born in
continued Cresson, Pa., in 1856, and was educat-
the swin- ed at Bowdoin college where be dis-
ok, "with tinguished himself both in scholarship
the strid- and in athletic prowess. He later
produced went into the employment of the Un-

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