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July 27, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-27

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WEATHER

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A

UNSETTLED; PROBABLY
SHOWERS TODAY r

Litw

Ra ti,

DAY AND MG
SERTIC

VOL. XIII. No. 30

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN;THURSDAY, JULY 27, 1922

PRICE F

HIL EXECUTIVES
CLAIM SUCCESS IN
FREIGHT SHTIPMENT

STRIKERS' RANKS'STILL 100
CENT STRONG, SAY THE
LEADERS

PER

LABOR BOARD HOLDS TO
"HANDS-OFF" ATTITUDE

Western Farmers Fear Crop Ruin
less Walkout Is Settled Im-
mediately

Un.

(By Associated Press)
Chicago, July 26.-Western railway
executives in a statement tonight as-
serted freight is being moved as of-
fered without congestion and passen-
ger traffic is being operated normally,
while leaders in the railway shop
men's strike still maintained the walk-
out was virtually 100 per cent.
The statement issued by the west-
ern president's committee on public
relations of the association, of railway
executives, said carloadings exceed
those of a year ago except at roads es-
pecially effected by the coal strike.
All western lines with headquarters. in
Chicago report increases in the num-
ber of men at work in the shops, the
statement said.
The United States railroad labor
board maintained its "hands-off" pol
icy~.
Farmers Fear Disaster
Telegrams.were received from the
Idaho Producers union and the Idaho
Farm bureau federation asserting that
fruit .and vegetable growers faced dis-
aster unless the strike can be settled
at once.
E. F. Gable, head of the mainten-
ance-of-way union, scouted reports
from Detroit that his organization
was again talking of striking and an-
nounced that he intended to submit
to the board application for wage re-
hearing on several roads. He said
about 20 applications will be ready
for the board by the end of the week
President Harding conferred with
W. W. Atterbury, vice-president of the
Erie, Pa., railroad and Secretary
Hoover, regarding the strike, Mr. At-
terbury stating that the seniority
question was taken up.
The freight embargo on perishables
and live stock to and through the state
of Montana, imposed last week be-
cause of railroad strike conditions, has
been lifted, it was announced at the
western headquarters of the Great
Northern railway today.
Henry L. Adams, attorney for the
Chicago, Northwestern railway, told
(Continued on Page Four)

MRUAEDWOMEN'S REGISTRY DING SETS VFUE
Miss Bel Ribble, a graduate of the Accordingto present indications, the
University, has been appointed prin- IIOI GHT enrollment of women will be larger this
cipal of the Sao Paul graded school fall than ever before. Even at thisDT
in Brazil.,The school was organized early date all the dormitories and l.r-
and is supported by the American To Present Seven-Act Program of ger league houses are full and most
chamber of commerce, and is said to Variety in Hill Audi- of the dormitories already having a
be one of the finest American schools toriUm waiting list. Thus far more than 200 7Q vg# d r* ete
in South America. It was founded freshman women have applied for ad- . f
with the sole idea of providing ade- DRAMATIZATION OF LEACOCK mittance, according to figures givenP
quate educational facilities for chil- SKIT ONE OF OFFERINGS by Margaret Kraus, '23, secretary to
dren of American citizens in Sao the dean of women, as against between
Paulo, but children of English fami- Campus vaudeville kriists who will 100 and 150 at the same time last Appreciation of the classical com-
lies are admitted. In one year mat-. appear in the summer Spotlight sev- year. positions rendered 'by Miss Nell . B.
riculation has increased from 22 to en-act program tonight in Hill audi- Miss Helen Q. Bishop, acting dean of Stockwell of the School of Music fac-
56 'students. torium gave their final rehearsals women, expressed the opinion, how- ulty at the concert last night in Hill
All students are given grade and yesterday to the complete satisfaction ever, that several new league houses auditorium was complete, judged by
high school courses, enabling them to of members of the committee, who will probably be opened up this year, the applause which greeted the close
enter universities of the United witnessed the performances. Judg- thus alleviating the problem of housing of each number.
States. ing by the ticket sale, the audience for women to a certain extent. Miss Stockwell opened the program
will be fully as large as that of last with three Chopin numbers and re-
summerls Spotlight, at which more sponded to erepeated demands for an
than 1,000 people wee in attend- AS encore. In the latter part of the pro-.
ance, according to committee mem- gram the pianist played two Schubert
bers. numbers, "Lotus Land" by Scott and
OF CADILLAC MOTORS "The Argentine Tango," a dance U D 5 CIILIlATI"Staccata Caprice" by Vogrich, all of
act, the creation of Gordon Wier, '24, which are known and easily appre-
ON NINTH EXCURSION and Winnefred Smeaton, '24, is said SFcated by the average patron of music
to be fashioned after the typical S Ss7 F C Anthony J. Whitmire, violinist, re
, American dance steps. Wier and Miss sponded to repeated calls for encores
Guided through the new plant of the Smeaton have appeared here in sev- PROBLEM OF CROSSING NATURAL at the completion of three well ren-
Cadillac Motor Car company, Summer eral previous performances. dered numbers. Carl Lindegrn, bar
In $9.90" on-at frc byAl BARRIERS CAUSED MAN TO drdnubs.Cl nerna-
In "$99.90," a one-act farce by Al -tone, pleased his audience in three vo-
sessions students yesterday in Detroit, Weeks, '10, Don Coney, '24, and Wil- BUILD cal numbers, of which "Barrack Bal-
were able to observe one of the most liam M. Randall, grad, will register lad," (Kipling) by Bell, proved the
modern factories in the United States. "mystification" in their efforts to Tracing the historical development most popular. Mr. Lindegren closed
Starting out wth a view from the solve the "great billiard cue mys- of bridge construction and pointing his program with a rendition of
fourth floor, the tourists ,were shown tery-" The act is a dramatization of out the differences between contin- Scotch, Irish, and Swedish folk
' ~Stephen Leacok's "The Qe"fottedfeecs ewe ot
first thrtugh the 'uildings of the man- his book of "Nonsense Novels." ental and American bridges, Prof. songs.
ufacturing section. A novelty/ in vaudeville acts is Lewis M. Gram, of the department of
Great contrast with the Ford method. promised by the committee in "Five structural engineering in the Colleges REGENTS TO INSPEC
of assembly was particularly noticed Minutes Before the Big Show," in of Engineering and Architecture, gave 1
in the motor building. The Cadillac which a circus band and all of the illustrated lecture yesterday after-
features of a big circus side show willanilsrtdlcueytrayfer I8 0 '
people recognize the principle of pro- be presented. Special scenery has noon in the Natural Science auditor-
gressive manufacturing in the move- been painted for this act. ium.
ment of materials and parts in a gen- Sgngs and patter with piano accom- Art of Bridge Building Old Regents J. E. Beal and Hubbard
eral direction, they believe that this paniment will be offered by James H. Professor Gram pointed out the fact leave today for a trip to Camp Davis.
method is not suitable for their rer Tuttle, '23E, and Carl Weinman, -'24, Friday and Saturday they will attend
quirements in engine assembly. The in their black face act "Some Dark that the art of bridge building is as the meeting of the Michigan Histori-
responsibility of assemblipg each Cad- Stuff." old as civilization itself and, in fact, the meety t Mcin stri-
illac engine is given to one man, an ex- The performance tonight will be- was a means to the attainment of civ- cal society at Mackinaw. Saturday
pert in the work. The sub-assemblies gin promptly at 8 o'clock. Tickets ilization. He showed that man, being afternoon and Sunday they will be the
and parts are brought to him arranged may be secured at any of the State primarily a nomadic creature, is en- stsof Prof. Clarence T. Johnston,
on a convenient rack. In this way street bookstores or at the auditorium director of the Davis engineering
each engine is individually built so box office before the performance. dowed with the instinct of travel. cam
that each assemnbler has an incentive This fact early in his existence, rais- camP.
On their way back to Ann ,Arbor
to maintain a higher standard of ed the problem of surmounting natur-t
crafsmanhip.al brries. .they expect to stop off at Bay City
craftsmanship. U, s, OFFERS MAINES talokovrbacllctonofboksbe
All of the bodies except some for to look over a collection of books be-
the enclosed cars are made at the C,ad- longing to Regent William Clements.
ilac plant and then brought for fin- EDUAION VIA MAILS these obstacles was the projection by This shipment purchased by Regent
ishing to the assembly building. After primitive man of a single log across Clements last spring has just arrived
upholstery the body goes to the final a stream or valley so that by feats from London and will be brought to
assembly line on the first floor of the Washington, D. C., July 26.-The of balancing they were able to land the Clements Library as soon as it is
assembly building. Windshield, instru- United States marine corps is now of- safely on the other sid The second feasible. Regents Beal and Hlbard
ments and other parts of the body are fering every recruit a complete corres step toward progress in ~the art of expect to return on Tuesday of next
put on and the body placed on the pondence school course of instruction bridge construction is the suspension week.
chassis for final testing. , in any one of a great number of sub- of two logs across the stream thus
With the final road test, the car is jects.' The course is taken at govern- enabling the passage of animals. He CAMP CUSTER TO GET NEW
given a thorough cleaning after which ment expensetduring the three-year pointed out that these steps, how- $1,500,000 U. S. HOSPITAL
it is covered with linen to keep out period of enlistment. c ever, were not engineering feats in the!
the dust and is then loaded into box The recruit may select from a wide strict sense of the word. Washington, July 26.--Camp Custer,
cars for transportation. choice of courses, ranging from engin- Professor Gram then showed that Michigan, is to receive the hospital
eering to stenography. All text books because of the need for economy and project which was to have been located
are provided free by the government accuracy in our present day, engin- at the Great Lakes Naval Training
.0 CF E 0 ST AN 0and instruction is conducted through eers have perfected their art so that tation, Director Forbes, of the Veter-
SE0 the regular staff of the international now they can erect a bridge according ans bureau, announced today. The
Correspondence School. The course to exact specifications. new hospital, which will handle ment-
any of the Hindu alumni, that we is taken while in camp in addition to Romans Contributed Much al cases, will have 500 beds and will
know of, believe in the radical doc- the regular military training. He then discussed the contribution be constructed at a cost of approxi-
trines, as above enunciated, or are Recruits who have had a high school of the Romans toward bridge build- mately $1,500,000.
members of the so called radical par- educationwmay be sent to Washington ing. They gave two, specific things.
ty. We whole-heartedly avow the and given practical training in sub- First, their skill and superior work- Express Clerks Strike Averted
creed of the Indian National Con- jects such as bookkeeping and ac- manship in the use of cement. Second, Atlanta, Ga., July 26.-The threat-
gress-a body whose membership ex- counting. It is the purpose of the they worked out for practical use the ened strike of clerks of the Southern
ceeds .10,000,0000 of the adult popula- marine corps to give every enlisted type of circular arch used in bridge Eastern, Express company has bee
tion of India, and of whom Gandhi is man an education in some trade or building. averted, it was announced tonight by
the renowned head. business during his enlistment period. Professor Gram illustrated with H. C. Caldwell, genral chairman of the
We are proud of following a creed slides the differences between Eng- clerks' brotherhood, after a confer-
to which the whole of India sub- Indiana to Operate Mines lish, French, and American bridges. ence which he and other union offi-
scribes; its object being, "the attain- Indianapolis, July 26-Gov. War- In the main, the difference lies in the cdals held here with J. B. Hockaday,
ment of Swaraj by all peaceful and ren T. McCray announced tonight fact that the continental bridges are president of the company.
legitimate means="' If this party in that the state of Indiana was arrang- constructed over rivers on which nav-

the opinion of the writer is to be dub- ing to take over and operate "suffi- igation is .not great and consequently Senate Raises. Wool Tariff
bed "radical," then we make no apol- dent mines to supply Indiana's neces- do not have to build high bridges, Washington, July 26.-A raw wool,
ogy for our views. We are, on the sities." while the Americans are forced to al- tariff rate of 33 cents a pound and
other hand, sorry that Michigan The announcemnt was made in a low for the passage of great ships. clean cotton, 8 cents more than pro-
alumni are represented in the passive telegram to John Hessler, president of In conclusion, Professor Gram posed by the house, was approved to-
battle of India's freedom, by one sole the Indiana miners, who is in Phila- showed a number of local bridges and day by the senate, 38.to.16. Four Re-
figure of Doctor Hardikar, while hun- delphia in an effort to arrange the told of the work going on in Wayne publicans voted against the rate and
(Continued on Page Four) settlement of the main strike. and Washtenaw counties. six Democrats supported it.

L \EMERGENCY
ICOA LI D ISTHlE
SECRETARY WIRES G1
TO SET UP OWN S
ORGANIZATION
WASHINGTON WI
CENTER. OF MOI

States

(By Associated Press)
Washington, July 26, - Pi
Harding tonight set in ,mots
federal emergency fuel conti
ganization with the selection
central coal, distribution commt
government officials under the
manship 'of Secretary Hoover.
The commerce secretary,
request of the President, imn
ly wired the governors of the
states asking them to set up
gency state organizations as t
step toward decentralizing the
zation for equitable distributi
maintenance of fair prices for c
der the administration's plan.
Hoover Wires Governor
"Under this plan," Mr. Hoov
"the distribution for railway
be directed from Washingto
with the possible exception o
state 'public utilities, the rE
bili'y for all other distributic
rest upon organizations set, ul
state control."
Co-operation of state organ
was also asked by Inter-stat
merce Commissoner Aitchinsc
telegraphed the several transp
bodies of the states east of t
sissippi requesting them to
representatives of the commis
fair operation of the emergenc
ice order giving priority to tl
ment of coal and necessitie-.
President Selects Committ
The federal co-l distributic
mittee selected by the Preside
sists of .Attorney-general Dai
Secretary Fall, and Hoover, at
missioner Aitchinson, or theh
sentatives under the chairmar
the commerce secretary.
A fifth member is to be a
the committee later, Mr. Hoov
who will undertake the admin
direction, while the ultimate
ter of the oiganization "must
upon the situation."
This was taken at tie do:
department to indicate that tI
mittee would be an elast:c bo
adminstrative aid representii
railroad or geographical sectic
as New England or the Grea:
,region, pressed into service as
advice on the needs of those
may be required.

Will Be Respon
Shipment of Maj
of UtilitIes

SI ND0u

S T UDENT1

CLAIM THEY ARE NOT RADICALS,
BUT APPRECIATE LIBERTY
Editor Summer Michigan Daily.
Dear Sir:
Our attention has been drawn to
the editorial, in The Summer Daily of
the 26th instant, headed, "Hindu and
Other Radicals." There are state-
ments in the communication referred
to in the editorial, and in parts of
the editorial itself, which are liable to
lead to a misunderstanding of our at-
titude regarding the political situa-
tion in our country. The word "radi-
cal" in India has been associated with
the revolutionary party believing in
violence, and preaching the violent
creed, with their goal nothing less
than complete independence for the
country.
We wish. to make clear, that, none
of the Hindu boys in Ann Arbor, or

KNOW YOUR

The Presidents of the I
Michigan have been Rev.
Tappan, D.D., LL.D., 185
Erastus Otis Haven, D.D.,
1869; Henry Simmons F
president, 1869-1871, and
President Angell's abseni
States minister to China
James Burrill Angell, ]
1909; Harry Burns Hutc
1910-1920; Marion L. Bt
LL.D., 1920-.
Methodist Students to
Methodist students wil]
ty at 8 o'clock Saturda:
Wesley hall. It is to be
Methodist young people
who are interested. An
extended to all who des!

,5

The MICHIGAN UNION presents Its annual
Summer Spotligi
at HILL AUDITORIU
8 o'olook Ticketa at Door

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