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July 25, 1922 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

l

shortstops,

of the]

1ST BE IN THURSDAY

owns more than 75
est of which is Mas-
as built in 1841.
r 'buildings on the
uditorium, which has
y of approximately
Library. Alumnae
said to be the most
of its kind in the

PAIRINGS, FOR FIRST ROUND SIN-
GLES AND DOUBLES
ANNOUNCED
The first round in the summer ten-
nis tournament must be played off and
the scores turned in at the director's
office in Waterman gymnasium be-
fore Thursday evening, if weather
permits..

ub, Whitmore
h, nd chicken
card by day or
y for quality
.65.-Adv.

1-

In the first round the following men
drew byes and therefore go to the
second round: Niehuss, 1047-R, and
Rogers, 131; Gabler, 2280-W, plays
winer of first round pair; Harland,
253-W, also plays , winner in first
round; and Marais, 1047-W.
First round: Briscoe, 131, vs. Lin-
coln, 846-M; Wong, 2726-W, vs. Rufus,
2308-M; Pore, 5-M, vs. Brick; Howell-
gook, 713W, vs. Lander, 1366; Walt-
mire, 5-M, vs. Norris, 63; Haines, 2884-
R, vs. Spence, 63; Fox, 802-M,, vs.
Tait; Burrows, 2303-M, vs. Mildner,
1366; Donaldson, 213-F2, vs. Immel-
man, 1731-W; Samuel, 2897-J, vs. Fer-
nandez, 1332-J.
Doubles: Byes-Pore' and Walt-
mire, 5-M; Norris and Sunderland-
63.

physical education 'department, and
Professor Woddy; left field, Gail E.
Densmore, of the secondary education
department; center field, Clair K.
Searles, of the secondary ducation de-
partment; right field, Professor Ber-
ry or Professor Myers.
Coach Fielding H. Yost will be the
official umpire. The official score-
keepers for the faculty will be Prof.
George L. Jackson, of the department'
of history of education, and Prof. Al-
len S. Whitney, of the educational ad-
ministration department.
The regular meeting of the Educa-
tion club will be held tonight at the
Union; the time, the line-up for the
superintendents' and principals' team,
the base umpires, and other details
will be announced, then.
UNIVERSITY WOMEN
HAVE PICNIC TODAY
University women are invited to
attend a picnic'to be given by the Wo-
men's Educational club at 5:30 o'clock
this evening on the Island. Follow-
ing the supper a sing will be held
and games will be played under the di-
rection of Miss Agnes Cameron of the
physical education department,
If the weather 'proves unfavorable
the supper will be served in Barbour
gymnasium. Tickets can be obtained
for 35 cents from Esther Dunham or
Katherin Gunn at Betsy Barbour
house.
ZOOLOGY ASSISTANT BITTEN
BY SNAKE; BITE NOT SERIOUS
Miss 'Priscilla Butler, an assistant
in the zoology department, was bitten
on the finger by a snake belonging to
the zoology department, Sunday after-
noon. Miss Butler was taken to St.
Joseph's sanitarium, where the wound
was dressed by Dr. C. G. Darling. Ac-
cording to officials in the zoology de-
partment, the snake is not venomous.
Hospital authorities reported that the
wound was not serious.

BER1LIN RE6AINS PREWAR
DIPLOMATIC PDOS ITIDN
GERMAN CAPITAL NOW HOLDS
2,000 FOREIGN REPRESENT-
ATIVES
(By Associated Press)
Berlin, July.Oe.-(By mail.)-Berlin
is rapidly resuming its pre-war. posi-
tion as a diplomatic and consular
center and there are today 91 such
posts here, representing 58 countries,
as compared-with the handful of neu-
tral and Central European represent-
atives which remained during the war.
The present diplomatic personnel num-
bers some 2,000, 'to which the United
States, Russia, and Afghanistan are
the most recent contributors.
The legation of Siam is the only
pre-war post which \has voluntarily.
not been reestablished. Peace was con-
cluded with that country at the sign-
ing of, the Versailles treaty, but a sep-
arate agreement still is pending. How-
ever, the Turkish embassy, which re-
maineA during the war, was dropped
in accordance with the demands of
the- Entente and that country's inter-
ests here are now being handled by
the Swiss Confederation.
Austro-Hungarian Embassy Split
The outcome of the war is further
reflected in the changed representa-
tion of that territory which formerly
comprised Autro-Hungary. While it
formerly came entirely under one em-
bassy, since May 1. 1919, there has
been a -legation each for German-Aus-
tria, Hungary, and Czechoslovakia.
Altogether Germany now finds her-
self, after the elapse of three years
since) the signing of \ the Versailles
treaty, with virtually all of her form-
er relations resumed and a number of
new ones undertaken. The total rep-
resentation includes six embassies, 29
legations, one. nunciatory, five charges
des affaires, and two diplomatic posts
with heads who hold no definite rank.
There are 32 independent consulates'

and consular representatives in eight
legations, besides representatives of
eight powers whose official designa-
tion has not yet been established. Al
few of the smaller powers merely have
consuls at Hamburg.
Only Three During War,
During the war there were only
three embassies in Berlin, those of
Austro-Hungary, Spain and Turkey,'
besides 10 legations, all of which had
consulates corresponding. There were
also the papal representative, com-
mercial offices, and Luxemburg and
San Domingo, and the consulate-gen-
eral of Paraguay.
Great Britain resumed diplomatic
relations with Germany Jan. 13, 1920,
and most of the other powers followed
in quick succession.
WELLS WILL WRITE
ON UNIVERSITY GOLF
Carlton F. Wells, of the rhetoric
department, now golf champion of the
state of Michigan by virtue of his vic-
tory over A. V. 'ee, junior, of De-
troit, in the tournament at Flint last.
week, has been requested by the edi-
tor of Golfers Magazine to write an
article on "Golf in the University,"
for that publication. The article will
deal with golf in universities in' gen-
eral.
Wells'has been elected an honorary'
life member of the Kalamazoo Coun-
try club, in his home city. Wells has
been- playing the game of golf since
he was 12 years of age; he started as
a caddy on the Kalamazoo Country
club links.

TO INSPE(

Prof. John H. Bateman and E
C. Smith, of the highway engi
department, left yesterday af
for Springfield, Ill., to inspe
Bates experimental road built
state highway department of :
This road, which consists of
different kinds of paving, ha
made to determine the merits
ions road treatments, and is
ing the attention of highway en
from the entire country.
A special train chartered
Detroit Automobile club took'
sor Bateman and Mr. Smith a:
ers interested to Springfield.
Gun and Bladers Beat Exchang
Members of the Gun and
baseball team defeated the Eg
club team on Ferry field yester
the score of 8-7. The Gun and
erA will play the mathemati
partment team of the Univers
mQrrow night on Ferry field
Daily Wants Ads bring results

DO

'O GO
v of Po(

f -.

tIn

e rirst round o the uoubes: Brimk
of m and Tait vs. Briscoe and Rogers, 131;
Haynes, 2884-R, and Rufus, 2308-M, vs.
t Harland, 2535-W, and Burrows, 2303-
® M; Chesley, 63, and Hettrick, 63, vs.
Lincoln, 846-M, and Donaldson, 213-
F2;Marais, 1047-W, and Immelman,
e 1731-W, vs. Niehuss, 1047-R, and
Wong; 2726-W.f

A Bronze
of the Unibie
is the most fitting and
insignia you can secur
Our representativei
orders at 20% off 1921
Place Your Orde
NATIONAL CC
EMBLEM COM
DETROIT . . M

Professors' Nine
you a 1tF
e acese Teachers
wantsTeam Tomorrow
Dignity is to be cast to the four
winds by sedate faculty members to-
morrow when the staff of the School of
b hEducation meets the superintendents
r bo r and principals in baseball at the get-
k together of all summer students in
education at Ferry field.
The probable faculty line-up is as
es:' follows: Manager, Prof. Clifford Wod-
nd Huron St dy, of the educational department;
ty Ave. catcher, Wray H. Congdon, of the edu,
cation. department; pitcher, Prof,
George E. Myers, of the vocational
educational department; Prof. Charles
S. Berry, of the educational" psychol-
ogy department, or T. Luther Purdom,
o, want of the educational psychology depart-
ment; first base, E. D. Mitchell, di-
sell at rector of intramural athletics; second
"rices- base, George H. Alderman, superin-
tendent of schools, Newton, Ia.; third
IS base,, Prof. Earl Hudelston of the
secondary education department;

THE COOLEST

TH A

'RE IN

....,. :

THEA

r -
7 1

-e -m -e -a am -im -m - .

IOnnis Supplies
Racket Resringing
24 Hour Service

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TOMORROW AND THURSDAY
Wh n tthe Lover Becomes the Husband Sb
His Love Change ? SEE
"Don't Neg lect Yo
Wife"

,.
' ~ t s

I N. University Ave.'

Next to Arcade Theatre

__ _
-----_

--® - -M- - - -o-

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BRING YOUR IDEAS TO THL
ANN ARBOR CUSTOM
SHOE FACTORY
Te will make use of them and the best
ather to make your shoes. Bring your
pairs to our factory at 534 FOREST

GARRICK Mats.es.,255
Ngt,25.i60-75c-$i
13th Annual Season 12th Week
THE BONSTELLE CO.
ZONA G %LN'S GREAT COMEDY SUCCESS
"MISS LULU BE TT"
Next:-DEAR ME"

VWA/

i;

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II

I

;:

..

Daily Service
IT-IN-BAY
ANDUSKY
g Steamer Put-in-Bay)

HE
"THE
"Al

_-,, .. __- _.,..e__-..

LAST TIME TODAY

171,1,

11U

- - - - - - - - - - - -

"Don't Neglect Your Wife" is a drama of San Francisc
the wicked Five Points district of old New York: It is th.
screen story from the pen of one of America's greatest wri
Atherton.

RBERT RAWLINSON
IN
E MAN UNDER COVER"
Wed.-Thur.
BERT LYTELL
las Ladyfingers"

k..

j.. ..

,~BP ZDUn EJ

I

1 \! r i 'p
r ti. n \ ,;, a v I'1V,*7 7

to PU
and S
(On the Bi

"DER.BY DAY"~
Featuring
MONTY BANKS.
LAST TIMES TONIGHT
in
*RECIILUJ YOST,
See the Collision between an Ocean-going Yacht and a big Tra
/Atlantic Liner.
ADDED
"Toonerville Blues"
A FOX-FONTAINE COMEDY

'I

Fines t exclusive Excursion Steamer. Largest Ball 0
Room Finzel's Orchestra. No extra charge for danc-
ing. Steamers leave on Eastern Time.
Every day from Detroit at 9:00 a. m. for
PatIn-Bay-Connecting with Cleveland and
Buffalo Transit Co., and Steamer Arrow for
Middle Bass, Kelley's Island and Lakeside.
Sandusky-Connecting with Railroads and Suburban Lines.Fare $1.40
Cedar Point-15 min.by ferry from Sandusky, Fare including ferry,1.65
Excursion fares, (returning same day)
Put-In-Bay, week day, 80c; Sundays, Holidays, $1.15 Round trip.
Sandusky,~ every day, $2.00 Round trip.
Four hours at Put-In-Bay; Bathing, visit the Caves, Perry's Monument.
Pavilion. Groves, Dancing and many other attractions, several Hotels.
Cedar Point-Fresh water rival to Atlantic City; Large Hotels Board Walk,
Thousands bathe here daily.
Returniing: Leave Cedar Point by Ferry for Sandusky Leave Sandusky
from Big Four Dock 2:30p.m. Put-In-Bay 4:30 p.m. Arr. in Detroit 8:00 p.m.
Dancing Moonlights. Leave Ashley & Dustan Steamer Line
Detroit 8:45 p. m. Fare Wed. I
&Thurs.60cSat.&Sun.75c. J Foot of First St. Detroit, Mich.
Write for map folder

Today and Wednesday
j William FOX
-resents
" A r

The Coolest Place in Town to spend an Afternoon or
LAST TIMES 'TODAY
BERT LYTELL
IN
"Sherlock Bro'y

LI'

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J

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IfANIII

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