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July 25, 1922 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-25

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ASSOCIATEI
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DAY AND NIGHT N
SERVICE

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o. 28

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, JULY 25, 1922

PrIC,

I -.

AGENTS'
'8 EVENTED
BITR ATION

REPARED TO FORM NEW
SHOPWORKERS'
UNION

PEACE MOVE
D O. RAILROAD

i;Outbreaks Mark Progress of the
Walkout; Grand Trunk Cuts
More Trains
(By Associated Press)
hicago, July 24.-The averting of a
ke of approximately 10,000 station
nts, preparations for the formation
new unions of shopworkers on 40
tern roads, and negotiations far a
arate peace of the Baltimore and
o marked the progress today of the
way shopmen's strike.
'he move for new unions to take the
ce of the striking shop crafts was
iated by L. S. Loree, eastern re-
nal chairman of the association of
way executives, and was taken as
indication of the intention of the
ds to hold out against the strikers'
nand for a return of seniority
its as preliminary to any settle-
it.
To Act Independently
he eastern roads, according to Mr.
ee plan to take advantage of rul-
s by the labor board by organizing
rishopmen in such a way that each
tem will have its own .union, and
1 be able to negotiate separately
h its men.
arleys for a separate peace, due,
orrow at Baltimore, between rep-
entatives of the striking shopmen
he Baltimore and Ohio railroad at-
ted considerable attentio n in
on circles,. but- strike leaders re-
to make any comment
he efforts of W. L. McNeminen, la-
member of the railroad board, to-
prevented further spread of the
ke in a conference with W. J.
me, head of the station agents 'or-
ization. Mr. Moone complained
t the station agents were being
ed to do the work of the strikers,
Mr. McNeminen gave him such as-E
inces that any grievances would!
corrected that he afterward an-
nced that the station agents would I
ain at work pending a conference
h the labor board.
Few Outbreaks Reported
omparatively few outbreaks due
he' strike were reported during the
, but further cancellations of
ns, said to be due mostly to the
rtage of coal, were reported from
ious sections. The Grand Trunk
k off 'two trains between Chicago.

STUDENTS TO SEE
CADILLAC PLANT
Summer session students will make
an inspection tour tomorrow in the
Cadillac Motor plant in Detroit for the
purpose of contrasting the methods
of high efficiency production in the
Ford factory.with those used in a
plant where painstaking and accurate
workmanship is the order. .
The party will leave Ann Arbor for
Detroit via the D. J. and C. electric.
road at 1 o'clock tomorrow afternoon,
to arrive at their destination at 2:35
o'clock.
The Cadillac company boasts. one of
the most efficient and tip to date
plants in the country, having been
completed in 1920. some of the points
of interest which will be seen by the
students are the tool making depart-
ment, the machine shops, the motor
and final assemblies, and the shipping
and receiving rooms. The tour will be
completed about 5 o'clock.
PLAYS ON CAMPUS
Will Present Shakespearean Offerings
Three Days; Beginning Aug-
ust ThirdE

PERFORMANCE IS FIRST OF
KIND HERE SINCE

1916

'With the sky for a canopy and in
every respect approximating the stage
of Shakespeare's day, the Shakespeare
Playhouse company will give perform-
ances on the campus, Thursday, Fri-
day, and Saturday, Aug. 3, 4, and 5.
This is the first time since 1916
that the University has been able to]
include a theater performance of this
kind in the entertainment program
of the Summer session.
Frank McEntee is playing leading
roles in his own company which is
the one appearing here under his di-
rectorship. Besides the Shakespear-
ean plays "The Taming of the Shrew,"
and "Twelfth Night" the company will
give Galsworthy's "Pigeon," and "The
Admirable Mr. Critchon." .
Profs Frederick H. Koch, director
of the Playmakers' association of the
University of North larolina, who
spoke here last winter, said in speak-
ing of the Shakespeare Playhouse
company, "They made an important
contribution to our dramatic produc-
tions at the University of North Car-
olina. They are the finest all around
company of performers I have ever
seen in a university performance."
The stage will be set between the
Library and the Museum. Benches
will be setout accommodating about
1,500 people and burlap walls will be
erected to increase the audibility of
the players' voices.
These players are being brought
here through the efforts of the Eng-.
lish department of the University.
The plays will be offered at popular
prices.
TEALDI SPEAKS TODAY
ON H 9!1 KGARDS"
"Rock Gardens" is to be the subject
of an illustrated lecture by Prof. Aub-
rey Tealdi, of the landscape design de-
partment, director of the Arboretum,
this afternoon in Natural Science au-
ditoriun. Professor Tealdi will give
the details of flowers in rock gardens,
the localities of the gardens and their
possibilities. His slides have beei
made from photographs taken for the
most part in England and on the Con-
tinent, but he also will show some un-
usual ones from this ,country.

TELLS OF POWERS'
SIBERIAN POLICIES
PRESIDENT WILSON MAINTAINED
RUSSIA ShiOULD BE GIVEN A
CHANCE, SAYS SPEAKER
NO UNTOWARD ACTS
IN U. S. OCCUPATION
Lack of Transportation Facilities
Chief Cause of Famine, States
Rochester Professor
No untoward incidents marked the
American occupation of Siberia; the
i-n abitants genuinely liked us; we
paid for all damage, intentional or
otherwise; and we carried out to the
letter our policy of simply protecting
and in no way intervening or meddl-
ing In the political affairs of Russ-
ia, said Prof. L. B. Packard of the
University of Rochester, in his talk on
"Siberian Experiences," in Natural
Science auditorium yesterday after-
noon.
All of the Allies with the excep-
tion of the Americans had plans of
their own. in regard to the treatment
of the Russians that would eventually
further their own ends, Professor'
,Packard stated. The Japanese al-
ready had a strong foothold in Korea,
Shantung, and Manchuria and na-
turally wanted to secure the same in
the vicinity of Vladivostok, the only
remaining strategic position in east-
ern Siberia near enough to be a ser-'
ious menace to Japan. Wilson knew
something of the inside policy of the
Japanese in regard to the Asiatic
question and consequently when they
announced that they would go into Si-
beria alone "to subdue Bolshevists',
he came out in favor of a joint allied
expedition. France still hoped that
Russia, if managed properly, could be
regained for the allied cause.
Allies Urged to Stand by Russia
The British believed that if a strong
man could be produced to lead the
Russians they would come into their
own again as a strong nation. All of
the allies were disappointed upon the
arrival of, the Americans, when each
in turn discovered that we were not
there to help any one particular na-
tion but simply "to keep peace in the
family." Our attitude all the 4ay
through was compatible with the fre-
quently announced belief of the Presi-
dent that "Russia should be given a
fair chance," and that "we should
stand by her."
The Russian government was brok-'
en up, it is true, but Bolshevism did
not spread rapidly in Siberia, accord-
ing to the speaker. Siberia is' a pion-1
eer country, sparsely settled, and con-
sequently has no great industrialism3
and discontented elements. In somej
large cities a revolution occasionally
overturned the town, but this. happen-
ed rarely. The Soviet government was
set up in Vladivostok but most of theI
officials were retained from the old
regime. This situation makes the Jap-I
anese cries of alarm concerning the
spread of Bolshevism look rather du-1
bious.
Adventurers Disturbed Peace 1
The three great disturbers of the1
peace. were Seminov, whom we had
the pleasure of entertaining in this]
country not long ago, Horvath, and
Kalminoff, three adventurers who had
for their followers all of the outlaws

and cutthroats of the neighborhood
organized to terrorize the natives.
Their only means of subsistance wasI
stuff they had stolen or received by
holding up a farmer, charging him'
with being a Bolshevist, trying him,'
finding him guilty and imposing a'
heavy fine upon him. If he refused to
(Continued on Page Fout).

HUMAN FLY WILL
PERFORM TONIGHT
Mounted on six tables and .four
chairs on the top of the Whitney
hotel building "Dare Devil Jack" Rey-
nolds will perform his "human fly"
stunts at 7:15 o'clock this evening
weather permitting. In case of rain
tonight he will perform tomorrow. He
will first climb to the top of the build-
ing where he will give his exhibition.
Among other things that he will do
will be the stunt where he rides
around the edge of the roof on a bi-
cycle.
Reynolds was in Ann Arbor two
years ago and gave a similar exhibition
here at that time.
PEACE MANDAES
Approves All Provisions of Treaties at
Final Session of
Council
ENGLAND PLEDGES IMPARTIAL
ATTITUDE TOWARD PALESTINE
(By Associated Press)
London, Jnly 24-The mandates cre-
ated under the peace treaties were
given final seal of approval by the
council. of the League ,of Nations t
its last sitting this afternoon.
M. Viviani, of France, referred to
the council's action as a solemn and
important accomplishment "for the
league and one full of significance and
historic interest.
In an eloquent but restrained ad-
dress the Earl of Balfour outlined
Great Britain's future policy in Pal-
estine, which he said would beone' of
strict impartiality and justice in
which all traditional rights, senti-
ments and religious feelings of the
different racial groups would be rep-
resented and held inviolate.
He predicted great material pros-
perity, record advancement and fuller
privileges for the Arabs and others
under the new regime. He was confi-
dent that the establishment of a Jew-
ish national home, which has been ac-
claimed in America, as in Europe,
would not be antagonistic to or incom-
patible with their interests.
Carl Lindegren
Sings.,Tomorrow
The faculty of the School of .Music
will give their weekly complimentary
concert at 8 o'clock tomorrow night in
Hill auditorium. Mr. Carl Lindegren,
baritone, head of the voice department
of the Michigan State Normal col-
lege, Ypsilanti, will. appear as guest
soloist. Mr. Anthony J. Whitmire, act-
ing head of the violin department of
the School of Music, and Miss Nell B.
Stockwell, of the piano- faculty, will
furnish part of the program.
The numbers given will be:
Nocturne Op- 15, No. 2.......Chopin
Waltz Op. 64, No. 2.........Chopiii
Etude Op. 25, No. 9........Chopin
Nell B. Stockwell
Hear Me, Ye Winds and Waves
...... . ..... . . Handel
Bois Epais............. Lully
Barrack Ballad (Kipling).......Bell
Carl Lindegren
Berceuse Op. 38 ........Eduard Grieg
Serenade Espagnole... . ...
......... Chaminad Kreisler
Polonaise, D major......Mynarski
Anthony J. Whitmire ....

Folk Songs:
Fagelns Visa (the Birds' Song)
..............Swedish
The Kerry Cow.: ..... ..... . .Irish
The Auld Fisher.... .....:.Scotch
The Hundreds Pipers .......:Scotch
Carl Lindegren.
(Continued on Page Four)

DEPARTMENTSI TO SUPERVISE AC'

III

UNIVERSITY UNIT
WINS CUST ER CUPS
(By a Summer Daily Staff
Correspondent)
Battle Creek, Mich., July 24.-Mich-
igan's infantry unit of the R. .0. T.
C. today won two out of the five cups
awarded by the sixth corps area in
competitive drills and contests.
One of the cups which the Mich-
igan representation captured was giv-
en for the highest rating in all sub-
subjects taught in the camp, including
tactics, musketry, rifle marksmanship,
bayonet and infantry drill.
The other cup is the "Best Spirit"
cup, given for the unit considered to'
have the best morale.
Other colleges entered in the com-
petition, from which Michigan easily
emerged the victor, were Illinois, Wis-
consin, Northwestern, Michigan Agri-
cultural college, and Culver Military
academy.
The Michigan unit is commanded by
Captains F. E. Collins and W. C.
Louisell.
p ! j
BELIVEDDROWNED
Disappears from Launch Near Lake-
side, Mich.; Search Party Finds
Empty Boat
NO DEFINITE INFORMATION
OF WHEREABOUTS AVAILABLE
(Special to The Summer Daily)
Toledo, Ohio, July 24.-All efforts to
find the body of Sidney Kripke, '23,
who was attending the University of
Michigan Summer session, and who
disappeared from a launch in Lake
Erie near Lakeside, Mich., Sunday,
have thus far proved futile, and police
of Lakeside and surrounding terri-
tory are now entertaining the belief
that he was drowned.
When he had not sreturned late
Sunday night, a search party was be-
gun, and after a search of the lake
the launch, in which Kripke had set
out alone, was found empty about a
mile from shore.
Althought no cause for the disap-
pearance has yet been discovered, iti
is feared that Kripke was seized withi
cramps while out in the launch. Bath-
ers in the vicinity say that they saw
him early in the afternoon diving from
the boat.
Kripke was a member of The Sum-
mer Daily staff. He left Ann Arbor
last Friday to join his family at their
Lakeside cottage. When he did not
return today for his regular assign-
ments, inquiries were started, and it
was found that S. L. Simmons, of 1354
Geddes avenue, this city, 'Kripke's
landlord, had received the following
telegram last night from Toledo, where
the Kripke family lives: "Sid is miss-
ing. Notify school. Wire if in Ann
Arbor. (Signed). Harold Kripke."
The latter is a brother of the miss-
ing student, and a graduate of the
University, being a member of the
class of 1921E. It was also found that
Kripke had not been in attendance at
any of his classes yesterday.
At 11:15 o'clock last night, a long
distance call to the Kripke home In
Toledo resulted in the information
that the family had left the city and
had gone to Lakeside.

HOOVERH PLAN FO R C OALDISTRIBUTIC
AND PRICE RESTIICflON ANNOUNCI

COMMERCE SECRETARY'S 4
LINE TO BE DISCJSSED
FURTHER
"ENTIRELY LEGAL,
STATES DAUGHER
Administration Committee Will 1
Operators' Body; Price Agre
ments to be Kept in General
(By Associated Press)
Washington, July 24.-Agreemem
a tentative plan for distributio:
coal and for restriction of u
prices was announced tonight by
retary Hoover after a series of
ferences with representatives of
ducing operators, the railroads,
interstate commerce commission,
other departments of the governr
The plan, which was describe
Attorney-General Daugherty in at
inion as "entirely legal," is to be
cussed further tomorrow. by the
ferees and the agreement of the
erators present was dependent -
thelapproval of their various neg
tions.
Plan Announced
The\tentative plan follows:
A committee in Washington, t
appointd by the President, of r
sentatives of the department of c
merce, the interstate commerce c
nrission, the department of justice
the department of the interior t
designated the presidential commi'
this committee if to have 4eneral
ervision of the measures to be t
here, and to authorize the exec
of such of these measures as ma
necessary from time to time.
"The administrative commi
comprising representatives of the
idential committee together with
resentatives of operators, repres
tives of the railways, and where
cessary, representatives of the la
consuming groups.
"The presidential committee wil
tablish a representative in each
producing district.
To Name Operators' Commltte
"The presidential committee wil'
point a committee of operatori
each district to be nominated by
district operators who are indepen
operators (in case of failure of
operators to take such action the;
idential committee may appoint
operators as they see fit on such<
mittee). The members of the dis
committees may be changed as de
mined upon by the presidential <
mittee.
"The presidential committee
co-operate with the interstate <
merce commission 1j carrying out
ferential orders issued by the <
mission.
"The governmental representa'
in the districts, with the co-oper
of the district committee, shall
vise the agencies of the inter-
commerce commission as to local
movements to effect the purpose
this plan.
"The operators will proceed
their usual business until they
affected by preference orders.
"It is expected that the dis
committee under authority of the
idential committee will recomm'eni
allottment of cars on the basis of t
(Continued on Page Four)

lulletin
on, July 24.-While on the
crete developments in the
trike were lacking In
today, the impression
fficial circles was that the
as being rapidly "shaken
point where a new move by
tration could be expected.
members who discussed'the
invariably declared that
[arding was, in personal
he question.
evidence was obtained,
at some of the chief exec-
sers have urged that t he
can permit the breakdown
try's arteries of commerce
rther while waiting for the
the present problems.

THEL DALI
There will be an importan'
of the entire editorial staff any
of The Summer Michigan I
o'clock today.

t..
irr.r

- ,_

ER S

Thursday
JULY
HILL AUDIT M
8:00 P. 2

Tickets 50

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At

Wahr-s,

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