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July 23, 1922 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-23

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DAY AND r
SER

ANN ARBOR, I:TCHIGAN, SUNDAY, JULY 28, 1922

P

i , '._ -_

0 SCHOLARSHIP
GIVEN UNIVERSITY
re hundred dollars has recently-
given the University for the sup-
of a fellowship in applied sociol-
in the Graduate school for the
1922-1923.
ention of prospective applicants
,lied to the curriculum recently
n up for students in this field.
ecial bulletin may be had on ap-

INDIANA LAWYER
NAMED TO LABOR
POST BY HARDING
.. --4i

PROF. PACKARD TO ,, P
LECTURE MONDAY flRflI LuPi LI d [FAR iiiiuRFrir

Application for . the fellowship
should be in the hands of the dean
E of the Graduate school not later than
Sept. 1. Blanks are provided for the
purpose. Selection for appointment
may be expected not later than Sept;
15.
he
cs
WELS CPTURES
WE L1c-
as
as- TITLE HONORS AT
he
of -
3y. - TEI F I

~~~I11!!3 !1 1 i E i Y1 . I~'1fI V
Prof. L. B. Packard of the Univer-
sity of Rochester, who is a member of
the faculty eof the Summer session,
will lecture on "Siberian Experienc-
es" at 5 o'clock Monday in Natural
Science auditorium. Professor' Pack-
and was stationed at Vladivostok, Si-
beria, for nine months during 1918- "WINTER'S TALE' TO
1919. He was Captain of the Intelli- BE GIVEN MONDAY
gence section of the Ameiican expedi-
tion under Major-general William S. Final arrangements have been made
Graves, U. S. A. for the production of "The Winter'sl
General political conditions in Sibe- Tale," which is to be presented as a
ria, the relation then existing between public recital at 8 o'clock tomorrow
the American expedition and other night in University hall by the class
foreign forces, especially the Japanese, in Shakespearian reading under the
and personal experiences will form direction of Mr. George Wilner of the
the subject of his lecture. public speaking department.
This play was selected by Mr. Wil-
ner in preference to some of the bet-
ter known of Shakespeare's plays be-
cause of its possibilities in the por
trayal of emotion and because of the
variety of characters which it affords'
According to Mr. Wilner,: such plays
,as "As You Like L," while they are
Situation Calm While Government appealing have been overworked and
Adopts Watchful Wxiting therefore are not as much of a novel-
ty as one which has been less fre-
Policy quently used.
It has been a custom for the class
NO FEAR OF INDUSTRIAL . in Shakespearian reading to give at
SHUTDOWN IN SIGHT NOW least one recital during the semester
but a second play entitled "The Hon-
e'vioon" by John Toan wgillb h rp-

al
und

DEFEATS LEE OF DETROIT
FINAL ELIMINATION
ROUND

IN

site of MICHIGAN MAN PROVES
iv torn 'SURPRISE OF TOURNEY

Almost Equals Coarse Record
Turning in High Score of
Approximately 70

.ay

le (By Associated Press)
60 Flint, July 22.-Carlton S. Wells, of
Ann Arbor, instructor at the Univer-
- sity of Michigan, today won the Mich-
s igan Amateur golf championship, ,de-
lY feating Artlur V. Lee, Jr., Detroit Golf
s, club, 9 up and 8 to play. In the morn-
at ing round Wells turned in an approx-
imate 70, which would be a course
record but for the fact that several
ceg cuts were not played out'
ill Wells' victory was the more re-
r- markable because of the fact that he
d- was virtually unheard of outside his
ed home club until last year, when he
b- came to Lockmor for the Michigan
be event. Following his defeat by Dud
he Hewitt, of Lansing, in the round pre-
d- ceding the semi-finals of that tourna-
rk ment, Wells began preparing himself
et for this tournament and came here
IC determined to win- And he did, over
as strong a field as has ever partici-
al pated in the event.
Lee was likely off his game In the
morning, while Wells was traveling at
a swift pace. The margin of eight
- holes in Wells' favor at noon was the
t' result.
hie Wells came down to earth in the
ie afternoon and Lee kept up with him
be from then on until the windup on the
ds 10th. However, the Detroiter could
not make up his morning losses al-
though heflid win two holes to three
d- by Wells.
.st Wells' game today was the -same he
played on the other days. He was
'wild from the tees, with 13 drives in
ot the rough during the day, but that'
of did not bother him because with the
ry absence of trees on both poles here
ry 'he always had a clear way ahead for
he the green. His powerful iron recov-
ns eries did the rest. When on the green
srs he put in some telling licks with his
cutter, making one cut of 45 feet.
ad
he The south wing will be 144 feet long,
and a temporary entrance twill be
ng placed at the west end. Neither of
rt, the two large lecture rooms will be
st built with the first section, which will
nt contain 95 rooms, with six classrooms,
or 13 intermediate and advanced labor-
ed atories, and 28 research rooms. The
or structure will cost approximately

Robe Carl White.
Robe Carl White, Muncie, Ind.,.
lawyer andauntil recently chairman
of the board of review of the de-
partment of labor, has beien named
by President Harding as assistant
secretary of labor.' He .will have
charge of all immigration matters.
SUNDAY SERICES IN'
ANN ARBOR CHURCHES
"The Moral Challenge" will be the
theme of the pastor's sermon at the
morning service of the Presbyterian
church today. Prof. 't. R. Running, of
the mathematics department, will
speak on "The Four Dimensional
World" at the Student noon class.
Elizabeth Paravano, 125, will lead the
discussion on the topic "Grow" at the
Christian Endeavor meeting at 6:30
o'clock. This will be preceded by a so-
cial half hour at 6 o'clock.
Holy communion will be celebrated
at the 7:35 o'clock service at St. An-
drew's eipiscopal church this morn-
ing. Rev. George Backhurst of Brook-
lyn will deliver the morning prayer
and sermon at the 10:30 o'clock serv-
ice,
Miss Helen Allmendinger of. San
Francisco, a faculty member of th
Extension department at the Univer-
sity of California at Berktley will
sing a contralto solo at the First Bap-
tist church this morning. Robert Die-
terle, '231W, will also sing. The sub-
ject of the morning's sermon will be
"Spiritual Reinforcement." Following
the morning worship the Students'
Guild will meet at the Guild house,
where Prof. G. E. Meyers of the-School
of Education will give an address.'
Rev. Sidney S. Robins will preach
at the Unitarian church this morn-
ing.
Rev. A. W. Stalker will preach at
the First Methodist church this morn-
ing on the subject, "Life at Ebb Tide."
iThe students' class will, meet at 12
o'clock at Wesley hall. Prof. L. S.
Ramsdell, instructor in mineralogy,
will lead the discussion. Earl Dunn,
'23L, will lead the devotional meeting
at 6:30 o'clock.
Rev. C. A. Brauer will preach a St.
Paul's Lutheran church at the 9:30
o'clock service this morning on the
subject, "Obedience to the. Father."
Bible school will meet at 10:30 o'clock
and the English service will be held at
11:30 o'clock..

Washington, July 22.-While pre-
pared to wait for ten days or two
weeks, according to present indica-
tions, to test the success of efforts to
resume production at bituminous min-
es before adopting any drastic course
regarding the coal strike, the govern-
ment in the meantime today was push-
ing its plan for distribution of the
dwindling coal supply to insure con-
tinued operation of the railroads ind
essential industries.I
With present stocks of coal, there
will be no undue risk of an Indus-
trial shutdown, officials are convinced,
by a fortnight of waiting' to develop
the response to President Harding's
invitation to operators to resume op-
erations and the .government in 'the
meantime may consider the next steps
to be taken should that, effort fail.
What these steps might be was the
subject of prolonged discussion at yes-
terday's cabinet meeting, but withlut,
it was understood,: any definite formu-
lion of policy at this stage.
KNOW -YOUR UNIVERSITY
Nine schools or societies make up
the University proper. With their
deans they are as follows: College
of Literature, Science and the Arts.
Jhn R. Effinger, dean; Colleges of
Engineering and Architecture, Morti-
menr E. Cooley, dean; Medical schoc,
H. Canot, dean; Law school, Henry
M. Bates, dean; College of Pharmacy,
Edward 'H. Kraui, acting dean; *ol-
lege of Dental Surgery, Marcus L.
Ward, dean; School of Education, Al-
len S. Whitney, acting dean; Graduat
school, Alfred 1.'. Lloyd. dean; awl
the Summer session, Edward H..Kraus,
dean.,
Notro Dame Star to Coach
Dubuque, Ia., July 22.-Henry An-
derson, captain of the 1921 Notre
Dame football team, has been ap-
pointed football, basketball and track
coach at Columbia college, it has been
announced by athletic authorities at
the Eastern Iowa iinstitution.
Strike of Four Thousand Averted
Cincinnati, July 22. - A general
strike if °4,000 clerks, freight handlers,
station and expressmen on the Big
Four railroads was averted today
when the clerks and company officials,
entered an agreement covering wages.

cyluu Uy u xu Wl ePre
sented by the class on Aug. 18. This
production will conclude the pro-
grams to be put on 'by the public
speaking department during the Sum-
men session.
\.
FREE STATERS DEEA
IBSH HRLTROOIPS0
Dublin, July 22.-With both flanks.
of the Republican insurgent army
broken, through yesterday's capture
of Warford and Limerick, the irreg-
ular troops today were reported to
be retracting in the direction of
Cork. They are believed to number
some thousands . of soldiers, _suffi-
ciently equipped with all arms except'
artillery and are expected to give the
national army forces considerable
A
trouble in guerrilla tactics, but it is
doubtful fi they will make a deter-
mined stand before reaching Cork.
REHEARSALS BEGIN
FOR VODVIL SHOW
Hawaiian music by native players,
a dramatic' skit, and vaudeville acts
are being rehearsed for the Michigan
Union Summer Spotlight which will
be given Thursday night in Hill au-
ditorium.
Most of the players have appeared1
in other productions during the last.
year and are well known to tjniver-I
sity audiences. Gordon D. Wier, '24,1
was one of the oriental dancers in the1
Union opera last year. 'Dwan T. Tang,1
'24E, and Cyrus Tavares, '24, the
Hawaiian players were in the Union1
opera'last year. ,
Yesterday s Games j
American League
Cleveland '2, Washington 4.
St. Louis 10, Athletics 1.1
Chicago 5, Boston 2.
Detroit 2, New York 0. s
National League
New York 2, Cincinnati 3.
Phillies 7, Pittsburg 8.
Boston 8, St. Louis 9.
Brooklyn 7, Chicago 6.
President Harding Appoints Wilkerson
Chicago, July 22.-James H. Wilk-
erson, appointed by President Hard-
ing to succeed Judge K. M. Landis as
jurist of the United States district
court, today took the oath of office.

TUE RAIL 1STRIK]
SH OPMEN'S WALK
PRESIDENT SUMMONS HO]
DISCUSS NEW PLAN
ARBITRATION
REPORT 18,0M0 0M
MAY JOIN STRIKE R
Troops Continue on Guard I
Ststies; Injunctions Issue
/ Two lnes
kBy Associated Press)
BULhIETiIN
Washington, July 22. -.
spending eight hours toda
close study of the railroad
situation ,with Ben W. H
chirman of the railroad
board, and with other me
of the senate interstate com
committee, President'H
gave no intimation conce
conclusions reached at ,the o
once' or any possble oux
adinistrativ acion.
Chicago, July. 22-As "the"
4trike today entered its.fourt
negotiations for peace took
turn and expectant eyes tu:
Washington, where Ben W.
chairman of the railroad labo:
was called in for a confeen
the President and to the efforI
leading railroads to make s
peace with their striking shop
A conference between W. L.
imen of the railway labor bos
James J. Davis, secretary of 1
Mooseheart, Ill., also was rega
a possible producer of a p
i4 sture.
Further Walkouts Indical
Reports from half a dozei
that possibly 18,000 clerks an
hailway employees, had voted t
out and new indications that
was .facing a shop men's stri
ed -to the war talk, however,
President Grable's statement t
railroad that refused to i e
committees of maintenance
men to adjust wage difference
face a atrike' of these workers,
Troops Still on Gnar4
State troops ;continue on g
eight states, while additional
were placed on duty in vaniou
Court action was limited to i
of injunctions to the Missouri
and St. Louis-San F'ancisco ra
at I'ansas City. Filing 'of p
for injunctions at Atlanta by t
board Air Line and Western ;
lantic railroads, and the fili
suit by six labor leaders at
City, Kans., questioning the0i
the Kansas court of industria
tions to assume jurisdiction o
shop men's strike. The plai
the suit declared the strike in
in character, and not subject
law.
At Oklahoma City, Okla., 10
house workers walked out yest
Continue Cuts In Servil
While officials of the Main
of Ways union, at Detroit,. di
the question of punishing 'm
who struck without sanction
tenance men of the Pennsylva
tween Portage and Altoona, a
ed outin protest against a wag
Further, curtailment of tra
vice was announced by the
Northern railroad at Sioux h

D., where all short-run trail
cancelled; at Grand Forks,
where four local trains were
led, and at Spokane, Wash., a
number of branch line *train
discontinued, and an embargc
on perishable freight -and live

$450,000.

i ri

I '1

DER S

Thursday,
JULY
HILL AUDITM
8:00 P. M

Tickets
At Wahr's,

I

/

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