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July 22, 1922 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-22

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Ci4r

O'ummtr

I"

AND COOLER
TODAY

lii

:43 ,a t

PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT
SERVICE

?

No. 26

ANN ARBOR, MTCHIGAN, SATURDAY, JULY 22, 1022

:..

'r WHERE MIN 'Ai
UCATIO\N WOUL
MLE NEAR EAST
'RDBLEMELSEY
JLTY MAN REVIEWS PLIGHT -.
OF ASIA MINOR IN - -
LErCTUJRE -.
ERICANS ARE ACTIVE--
_RELIEF EXPEDITIONS
Religion and Low Mentality -
Have Hindered Settlement.
of Problem -
te. hope for future of the prob-
in the Near East lies in educa-
-in the altruistic, self-sacrificing
s of men and women from this
ry who will go ver there and Black portions of map indicate wi
to educate those unfortunate shopmen and stationary e
e," said Prof. Francis W. Kel- railroad operation have be
of the Latin department, in an
ss last~ evening in the Natural
ce auditorium on "The / Prob-J
of the Near East."
fessor Kelsey began his lecture
a historical resume of the gov-
ent of the Turks, and its ten- N 1 'CO BI E
towa'd brigandage. He spoke
a ascendency of Abdul Hamid to Amalgamation of Leading Newspapers
r, in 1876 and the consequent Goes Into Effect To-
alization of the government at day
:antinopple. When in 1908 his
e was overthrown and the Com- ANNOUNCEMENT ANTICIPATED
e of Union and Power came in- IN DAILY FIVE MONTHS AGO
istence the whole world rejoic-
id hoped for a splution of tie Consolidation of The Detroit Journ-
ion. Then when the 'errible mas- al with the Detroit News was effected
ided y the tephoand e yesterday when the News announced
1h, of the Armenians and Greeks yetra'htbginn oa h
place in 1917, everyone asked two newspapers would be combined.
easo w ityInferior The terms of the amalgamation were
mentaliyIfro not made public.
fessor Kelsey outlined the rea- The announcement had been antici
as three: the first ws politi- Teanucmn a enatc-
ying in the fiatthat the Turk- pated for some time, rumors being cur-
yenmin te fact tat terknt -- rent during the last six months that
;o enen has a different con- the Journal was planning to sell or
an of the purposes of the state- consolida wsom t Detroit
protection to its own people consoldate with some otherDetroit
second as rel'gious, and third paper.
the average Turk has not the Daily Anticipated Sale
ity for learning with which the On February 21, 1922, The Michigan
ef Christian is endowed. In Daily printed an announcement to the
t oCthis he quotes Sir Edwin effect that is was "rumored in Detroit
e, who says that in mentality the business circles" that the Journal had
,wos asthat inentalty the been sold to the William Randolph
iab race. Hearst interests. The Daily story
tures of the country were pro-.continued
1 on the screen and Professor It is said that associates of the
y spoke briefly on the work of Detroit News bid $1,100,000 for the
expedition and especially of (Continued on Page Four)
ican relief work. This work has
ed different phases, all of u
.have been helpful to the"SN LBORSNE
i, Armenians and Greeks. He
of the giving of food to the HI-R.NY . - NO N
ng, people, of the Y. M. C. A., eIIEEUiici du tiaWcoosU
free clinics, industrial schools, -
a homes for girls and the homes MUSKEGON SUPERINTENDENT UR-
he care of orphans, which GES BONUS SYSTEM FOR
[can men and women have car- TEACHER
on in the Far East. Professor -.--
y spoke in particular of the Co-operation and' harmony between
of Dr. Fred Shepard, '81M. school board and superintendent is the
r Shepard established a hospi- most vital factor in the success of any
Aintab, Turkey, which was the civic educational system, is the belief
ion of the people. of M. W. Longman, superintendent of
Desire Education Muskegon schools. Mr. Longman spoke
conclusion Professor Kelsey on "A Program for the New Superin-
d out the growing desire which t-endent" yesterday afternoon in Na-
eeping that country for educa- tural Science auditorium.
and he showed that the only "I had my misgivings concerning the
of salvation lies in this educa- advisability of employing married
which can.only be given the peo- teachers, but I have come to the con-
y American men and women who clusion that they can do as good work
o over there to give their lives as unmarried educators," said Mr.

e education of the unfortunate Longman in comparing the ability of
a of the Near East. married and unmarried members of
the teaching profession.
W STOREHOUSE Mr. Longman would insist on abso-
lute power of dismissal over all em-
BUILDING IS BEGUN pioyees of the school board. "Membars
of a board are no more capable of
crete footings are now being interfering in the superintendent's af-
d for the new storehouse of the fairs than he is of stepping into their
rsity buildings and grounds de- shoes as a lusinezs executive."
ent. The work is being done A bonus system for teachers who
a H. G. Christman Construction have done meritorious work dur.g
iny. About 15 men are employed the year would bring about greater
is job, which will be finished initiative on 'he part of employes, Mr.
i six months. Longman believes. This system, the
structure, which will be at- speaker stattd, s c uld be coupled wirae
I to the present building at the an intcllfr tce rating recor,. for In-
end, will measure 80 by 120 dividual studey~Il, which would act as
not including a loading platform a l asta for ;ud;.,ng the scons -. the
will also be built. The build- work done by i:ie teacher in his class

D RAIL STRIKERS ARE AFFECTING U. S.

l

MiM y
1
rR . ' : a a ^ tier
t
" L
tit%

|RILAND COAL STRIKES IN DEADLOC
N OUTBREAKS;U.S.TO "STAND PA
HOOER ONFERS TODAYWITH HARH

GOVERNMENT TO SEE WHETHER
PRODUCTION IS SUFFICIENT
FOR ESSENTIALS
HOOVER LOOKS TO COAL
S UP P L Y DISTRIBUTION

Senator
to

King Proposes.
Investigate Mine
Situation

Commission
Strike

here miners are idle. Lines indicate main railroads affected by strikes E
ngineers. Shaded states are those in which disorders an'd interference wii
en reported.

i
3

NORTHCLIFFE IN
GRAVE CONDITION
Londoi, July 21.-Lord Northcliffe's
condition continues to be a cause for
grave anxiety. His fever remains un-
abated and the heart action is con-
siderably impeded.
WELLS T O PLAYI'
GOLF FINA'LS TODAY

i
,!

Beats Bredin,
Club

of the Det'roit Country
at Nineteenth
Hole

A. V. LEE, DETROIT GOLF CLUB,
TO MEET WELLS IN 36 HOLES
Flint, Mich., July 21.-C. S. Wells,
an instructor at the University of
Michigan, and A. V. Lee, Jr., Detroit
Golf club, will meet here tomorrow in
the 36-hole finals for the Michigan
golf championship.
This pair divided /the most sensa-
tional round in the annals of the state'
event today. Wells defeated Lewis L.
Bredin, Country club of Detroit, in the
semi-finals on the 19th green, after
eliminating James E. Standish, Jr.,
Lockmoor, in the morning,' 2 and 1,
while Lee defeated T. Worden Hunt-
er, Country club of Detroit, in the
afternoon, 2 and 1, after disposing of
B. R. Cain, Detroit Golf club, in the
morning, on the 18th hole, 1 up.
Hunter became a semi-finalist by
disposing of Harry Allen, the young'
Grand Rapids player, 1 up, after 19
holes in the morning. Bredin's morn-
ing victim was A. P. Quirk, the
youthful Ypsilanti golfer. This match
was also decided on the 19th green.
SCOTT TO LEAD
PUT-IN-BAY TRIP
An all day boat trip to Put-In-Bay
on Saturday, July 29, is the tenth ex-
cursion on the entertainment pro-
gram of the Summer session.' The
trip will be under the direction of
Prof. I. D. Scott and Prof. D. H.
Davis of the geology department. The
classes in geography and geology will
go on the trip as well as others who
will go merely for the pleasure of the
excursion.
* The party will leave Ann Arbor at 6
o'clock Saturday morning on the
Michigan Central railroad for De-
troit, where they will take the steam-
er "Put-In-Bay" for the island, which
is in the western end of Lake Erie.
The party will arrive at Put-In-Bay
at about noon and start back at 5:30
o'clock, giving plenty of time to visit
the interesting points on the .island.'
Interesting geological features to
be pointed out are the limestone
caves, glacial markings on the rocks,
and the shore action produced by the
winds.
The island is geographically of in-
terest because of the fruit growing
which goes on for a longer period
there than at most places because the
frost is held off until the late fall.

NATIONALISTS TAKE
TWO IIHCITIES
Kill Civilians; Take Many Prisoners;'
Inhabitants Leave City Under
Bombardment
LIMERICK AND WATERFORD
NOW IN REGULARS' HANDS
(By Associated Press).
London; July 21.-Tie city of Lim-
erick hasabeen capturednbytthe Irish
national army, says a Central News
dispatch from Dublin this afternoon.
The nationals took. many prisoners,
together with arms - and ammunition.
Dublin, July 21.-The town of Wa-
terford, on the southeast coast of
Ireland, which was stoutly defended
by Republican insurgents, has been
entered by national army forces who
have already taken 50 prisoners, says
an official report issued by the na-
tionalist general headquarters early
today.
The irregulars have retreated from
the infantry and cavalry barracks and
from the post offlice, all of which now
are in the hands of national troops,
the statement says. The irregulars
now are retreating southward.
The nationalist fire from across the
river killed two civilians and wound-
:ed four others. Many inhabitants
have left the city because of the bom-
bardment and streets have been clear-
ed of pedestrians.
TANG AND TAVERES
TO BE IN SPOTLIGHT

(By Associated Press)
Washington, July 21.-The govern-
ment is prepared to "stand pat" for
a period of 10 days to 2 weeks in its
attitude towards the coal strike, it was
indicated today, in order to ascertain
whether sufficient production will be
obtained through the reopening of bi-
tuminous ipines under guarantee of
federal protection to serve the fuel
requirements of essential industries.
In the meantime, however, plans
for distribution of the curtailed sup-
ply of coal' are to be pushed, it was
said. Secretary Hoover announced
tonight that he had called a meeting
here next Monday of' representatives
of producing dlstricts 2in Pcnns-
vania, West Virginia, Tennessee, Ken-
tucky, Alabama, and Virginia to dis-
cuss the proposed "rationing" plan
and to formulate a policy designed to
restrain profiteering.
Hopeless Deadlock
While all' three parties to the re-
cent conference in Washington-the
government, operators and union-
seemed satisfied that the situation, as
it now stands, was hopelessly dead-
locked, a new move for restoration of
peace in the coal fields was seen in
the resolution introduced in the sen-
ate today by Senator King, Repub-
lican, Utah, who proposed creation
of a commission of five to investigate
both sides of the controversy and re-
port is findings. No provision was
made in the resolution for enforcing
the findings made by the commission,
but Mr. King expressed the opinion
that such a body's commands would
have more authority than did the con-
ference appointed by the President.
A survey of remaining coal stocks
was said to have convinced adminis-
tration officials that these were suf-
ficient to permit a fortnight of waiting
to develop the response to thle Presi-
dent's "invitation" to the operators to
resume operation without adding un-
duly to the danger of an industrial
shutdown through lack 'of fuel.3
Hoover Plans Distribution
Secretary Hoover's program for
emergency distribution was, said to
contem plate thebrganiz;tion of a
central committee here which would
act through local committees in the
(Continued from Page One)
OSE ATR TO HAVE,.
THREE VISITORS'NiGHTSi

CENTER OF PEACE ACT]
SHIFTED TO WASHIN
TON
BOARD CHAIRMAN (
WAY TO CONFER]
Gompers, A. F. L., Chief, Urge
ator-Union Conference to
tle Dispute
(By Associated Press)
Chicago, July 21.-Chairman
Hooper of th railway labor
wash' on his way to Washing
night for a conference with P.
,Harding, which administration
hope would be the basis for p(
gotiations in the national P
shop men's strike.
The third week of the walk
ed tonight with rail executives
ion heads firm'in their respecti
tions, described by Mr. Hoope
conclusion of unsuccessful pe
ferences here as "antidotal"
the newest peace activities c
at Washington, Attorney -
Daugherty held conferences a
the possibility of legal action
the rail and coal strikes was
ed, although it was said no in
procedings were contemplate
Daugherty, however, said that I
ernment had full power to seizi
of transportation or the produ
materials. essential to it, h7
system break down.
Separate Agreements Sou
While the administration w
paring to exercise its influe
bring pease additional roads
followed the lead of the Baltim
Ohio railroad and announced ti
arate peace agreement with th
would be sought. It was lean
day that the feasibility of seeki
arate agreements was one of t
ters discussed at conferences 1
hairman Hooper and rail ex
here a few ;days ago when c
tion efforts were stoppe d
Union officials of the minte&
way organization, meeting in
decided that any road failing
conferences with maintenance
men to adjust wage differenc
face a strike on the individu
The labor board had referred ft
matters back to the roads and
and directed that the issu' be
to the board in case an agree
not reached.
Replying to assertions of u
ficials that the question of es
ing national adjustment bo
holding up a peace settlemen
hiam H. Finley, president 'of t
cago and Northwestern rails
serted in a statement tonig
there is no connection betw<
present strike and the board of
ment.
More Trains Cancelled
Conferences continued tod
tween union officials and road
tives of the Chicago and North
in an effort to reach an agreem
prevent the walkout of 7,09 cl
Samuel Gompera, president
American Federation of Labo
advised the government to u
strikers and the rail executives
conferences as a means to sett
dispute.
No additional troops were ca
today although soldiers were
readiness in a half dozen st
few workers were beaten b
sympathisers at widely s
points, but no serious disorde
reported.
Many additional trains were
led and others were announce

discontinued tomorrow.
LAW SCHOOL TERM ENDS;
SECOND TO START M
Courses for the first term in
school will be completed with
classes. The second term wi

In their native costumes and play-
ing steel guitars, the Hawaiian mus-
icians Dwan Y. Tang, '24E, and Cyrus
N. Tavares, '24, of Michigan Union
opera fame, will appear in the Sum-
mer Spotlight Thursday night, July
27, in Hill auditorium.
These players, one of them from
Paia Mani and the other from Hon-
olulu, Hawaii, brought down repeat-
ed applause in "Make It For Two,"
last year's opera.
Besides the opera, Tang and Tav-
ares appeared in four other campus
prod/uctions last year.
Programs of the Summer Spotlight
performance of next Thursday night
have been received from the printers
and the acts scheduled are being re-
hearsed daily in Hill auditorium.
"It took only seven minutes to get
the next touchdown. The D. A. C. lost
the ball without making any gain with
their "V." Report of a football game
between the D. A. C. andThe U. of M.
from the Daily, Oct. 16, 1893.
SPOTLIGHT ACTS WANTED
More acts are needed for the
Summer Spotlight, which will
be held July 27 in Hill auditor-
ium. Anyone who has an act
or an idea for one is requested
to telephone Jack Briscoe at 131.

PUBLIC TO BE 'GIVEN OPPORTU-
NITY TO SEE MOON AT
BEST TIME
Students in the Summer session will
have the privilege of observing the
moon through the telescope at ;.the
University observatory at the corner
of Observatory and Ann streets at
8:30 o'clock on Monday, Tuesday, and
Wednesday evenings, July 31, Aug.1
and Aug. 2.
These nights have been selected be-
cause it is at this time that the moon
has nearly reached the first quarter
and it is then that the shadows can
best be seen. The shadows can be
seen equally well the last quarter but
as the moon does not rise then until
12 o'clock it was thought feasible to
select the first quarter for the obser-
vation nights.
About 450 tickets will be issued,
150 for each night. The guests on
each night will be divided into groups
of 50 each, coming at 8:30, at 9:30 and
10:30 o'clock, respectively. All guests
will be given an opportunity to look
through the telescope. Tickets will
be obtained at the Summer session of-

of reinforced es.
ic.an will ,m

led the existence
and nintea uA t

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