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July 21, 1922 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1922-07-21

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ASSOCIATED
PRESS
DAY AND NIGHT WIll
SERVICE

ANN ARBOR, MTCHIGAN, FRIDAY, JULY 21, 1922

PRICE 37vE C

ESBECK PLANS
ITE OPERATION
SCOAL MINES'
SANCTION OF PRESIDENT'
OPENING OF PROCEED-
INGS
RS AGREEABLE TO
IATE ARBITRATION

Two Continents Represented
In Todd Painting Collection

EXCHANGE CLUB.HTEBIS
HELD AT UNION

TVISIT ENGLAND

(By Janet Menges.)
American, French and English ar-
tists are represented in the collection
of paintings which is the gift of ex-
Congressman Andrew Todd of Kala-
mazoo to the University of Michigan
and which are now on exhibition in
Alumni Memorial hall. Ex-Congress-j
man Todd secured these paintingsj
both in this country and od a recent
trip abroad, -some of them in Paris
and some of them at the Royal Acad-

emy exhibition in London.

The pic-l

pathos of this picture will continue to
appeal. It is a long time before one-
passes on to the "Hut of the Tele-
phonists," which is the next paint-
ing. This work was awarded the gold
medal and diploma of honor at the
Paris Salon in 1920. "Pay or Quit"
by Anna Airy,. an English woman,
has attracted a great deal of atten-
tion, chiefly through the appeal of its
subject matter.
Passing into the north gallery the
first picture which the eye rests 'on
is "The Cathedral' at Rouen" by Ri-
gaud, a Frenclunan. The vivid col-
oring and the masterly technique
with which the artist has executed
this work are both charming and
puzzling. "Winter in Weehawkin"
by Reuderdahi, the painter of the
navy, is the first picture on the right
wall which catches one's attention.
It is done with the dash and vim char-
acteristic of this artist. "The Shadow
of Hunger," a lovely water color near
(Continued on Page Four)

FORMER CONOPUS CLUB:
RANKS OF NATIONAL
- GANIZATION

n Work in Face
's Order Against
arate Settlement

HARDI1NG MAIK ES
READY FOR WINTE
PRIORITY ORDERS WILL BE US
IN THE PRESENT FUEL
CRISIS
DAUGHERTY DECLARE
SHORTAGE INEVITAB
Will Aim to Maintain Transporta
and Keep Supply Open to Grea
Lakes Port

ENTERS
OR.

of, Union
Sep.

(By Associated Press)
Lansing, Mich., July 20.-Gov. Alex
Groesbeck tonight completed plans
r taking over and reopening, under
otection of state law enforcement
'encies, the bituminous coal mines
Michigan. Approval of the pro-
am by President Harding without
hich the Governor was reluctant to
oceed, was expected hourly, al-
ough, no word had been received
om Washington late tonight. A
finite move toward putting the plan
to operation, however, might be
oked for tomorrow, it was indicat-
Governor Groesbeck announced his
an to' place the mines under state
eration today, at the same time
aking public a telegram he had sent
the President asking authority to
t, calling the threatened paralysis
industry a "Challenge to govern-
ental authority."
Michigan operators have assured the
:ecutive of co-operation in his pro-
'am and there are 2,500 striking em-
oyees, the Governor believes can be
duced to resume work under state
otection, not withstanding orders
om .. L. Lewis, international head
the miners union, that no separate'
;reements are to be made. The min-
s, it was said, are willing to submit
eir wage differences to arbitration,
d told the Governor that Lewis' or-
r was all that stood in the way of
s program for resumption of work.
About one-half of the striking min-
s have found other jobs but at lower
ages than they received in their old
ale. Many of these, Governor Groes-
,ck believes would return to work,
would the majority of those still
le.
Failing to induce the miners to re-
rn in sufficient numbers to operate
e mines, the Governor declared their
aces might be filled with men em-
oyed by the state. Any experienced
iners, he believed, might be brought
the Saginaw valley from the upper
ninsula.
VIER '24, TO DANCE
IN UNION VODVIL
Gordon D. Wier, '24, "harem" dancer
ad female impersonator of "Make
For Two," the Union opera of last
ar, will appear with Winnifred
neaton, '24, in a dance in the Sum:
er Spotlight on July 27, according to
ck Briscoe, general chairman of the,
potlight.
Wier's creation in the opera last
ar was an Oriental dance, which
oved popular with audiences on the
ree weeks' tour made by the com-
ny in Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio.
Miss Smeaton, '24, has appeared sev-
'al times in.Hill auditorium in cam-
Is productiops, offering some folk
inces of Scotland and Russia.

tures are hung on the balcony and
the north gallery of Alumni hall.
They are as varied as the individuali-
ties of their different authors.
One's attention -is immediately
caught by the painting at the head
of the stairs on the right entitled
."Those who have no more a home"
by Maurice Raffin. The expression of
settled gloom which shadows the
faces of these French refugees cannot
fail to stir one. Long after the mean-
ing of the word refugees is lost the

PROF. ZOWSKI LEAVES fOR WARSAW;
ISEES BRIGHT, FUTURE FOR POLAND

Former Member of Enginering Faculty
Will Teach in Polish Uni.
versity, -
IS RECOGNIZED AUTHORITY I
ON HYDRAULIC MACHINES
Prof. Stanislaus J. Zowski (Zwier-
chowski), professor of mechanical en-
gineering, left yesterday afternoon
for New York, where he sails Saturday
on the Roterdam for Warsaw, Poland.
He was called there by the Polish gov-
ernment to accept the professorship of
hydraulic machinery at the Polytech-
nicum at Warsaw. Professor Zowski,
is recognized as one of the best au-
thorities in the country in his field.
Introduced Chair Here
The chair which he has filled here at
the University was introduced and de-
veloped by Professor Zowski during
his residence here, since 1907. The
work will be continued by Prof. Allen
F. Sherzer, assistant professor of me-
chanical engineering. The work which
Prdfessor Zowski will do at the Poly-
technicum will complete the curricul-f
um established since the rise of the
independent government of Poland.
The school is one of the three larg-
est technical institutions in Europe,
having astudent body of four thousand
in the engineering profession.
While Professor Zowski has ex-
pressed his regrets at leaving the Un-
ited States and especially ,the Uni-
versity here, the work which he will
carry on in Poland will be more ad-
vanced in that the students at the
Polytechnicum have gone through a
longer period of elementary and sec-
ondary school work before their ad-
mittance to this school of Nhigher
learning.
Poland's Future Hopeful
Professor Zowski considers the fu-
ture of Poland very hopeful, especially
if peace can be maintained with her
neighbors, Russia and Germany., Lab-
or conditions there are encouraging
and the attitude of the pjeople is one
of energy and hopefulness. New fac-
tories and railroads are 'being built all
the time and there is practically no'
unemployment. In the four times that
he has returned to his native country
since the war, Professor Zowski states
that he-has noted a steady improve-
ment in the conditions there.
"The peopleof Poland entertain a
very keen interest in education," Pro-
fessor Zowski explained that this it
not a new attitude but has continued
since the last days of her independence

in the latter part of the 18th centurf,
when Poland was the only country to
have a minister -of Education. Polish
education has its own characteristic
traditions in pedagogy and education
and the first thoughts of the Poles at
the conclusion of the war were for
her educational facilities. The Polish
army itself is a school where every
soldier is taught the ruliments of
learning, even before military tactics.
Sexes Have Equal Rights
According to Professor Zowski, the
Polish women have absolutely equal
rights with the men and enjoy the
same privileges in public life as well
as in matters of education. The Polish
Diet, which corresponds to our Con-
gress is composed of an astounding
number of women delegates.
The English language has come to
assume a larger part in the univer-
sity curricula of Poland, even sup-
planting French, which up until the
last few years has been the continent-
al language of Europ, 'Proftessor
Zowski states that an American travel-
ling that country would experience no
language difficulties with custom
house officials because of the almost
universal ability of the Poles to speak
English.
While Professor Zowski leaves
Michigan he does not expect to break
all ties here as he will visit this coun-
try, and Ann Arbor especially, at least
once a year and will become a mem-
ber of the Michigan club at Warsaw.
This club is composed of at least 12
Michigan men who are in Warsaw in
government employ or on private bus-
iness matters. He has been requested
by the Consul General Keena, a Mich-
igan graduate, to bring with him a
Michigan, song book. Professor Zow-
ski states that he looks forward to
making his home in Warsaw the gath-
ering place of these Michigan men.
14 ENTERED FOR
TENNIS TOURNEY

HAS LARGEST CHARTER
MEMBERSHIP IN STATE
Herbert Silvester Elected President of
the Newly Formed Local
Branch
Characterized as "the biggest baby
yet born into the family of affiliated
Exchange clubs," the Ann Arbor chap-
ter received its charter last night at
a banquet held in the banquet room of
the Michigan Union.
After the banquet a short address of
welcome by the president, Herbert Sil-
vester, in which 'he introduced the
toastmaster, J. W. McKone, of Jack-
son. The response was made by
Floyd Miller, of Kalamazoo, president
of the Michigan Exchange club, in
which he outlined the purpose of Ex-
change clubs.
The charter, a shield bearing the
seal of the club, was presented by L.
C. Harris, of Grand Rapids, presi-
dent of the National Exchange club,
and was accepted by Frank B. DeVine,
of Ann Arbor.
Upon suggestion of the toastmaster,
the roster of the Ann Arbor club was
called, each member giving his full
name and occupation. Following this
toasts to the new club were made by
representatives of the various clubs
attending. The principal Ann Arbor
speaker was Reverend Stalker, of the
First Methodist Episcopal church, who
delivered an. address on "Exchange-
ism."
'More than 100 visitors a'rived early
this afternoon to play golf at the
Barton Hills and Ann Arbor Country
clubs. One of the largest and certain-
ly most conspicuous groups was the
Jackson delegation, who wore caps
in imitation of prinson headgear, and
who performed a lockstep around the
banquet hall. Most of the towns in
the southern section of the state hav-
ing clubs were represented as well as
a delegation frown Toledo.
The local club, which was formerly
the Conopus club, was organized three
months ago with Herbert Silvester as
president, and Prof. J. A. Silvester,
of the Engineering faculty as secre-
tary. With 81 members on the roll,
the Ann Arbor Exchange club holds
the honor of having the highest char-
ter membership of any club so far ad-
mitted into the national organizations.
PHI DELTA KAPPA
HOLDS INITIATION

G r .
Gene Sarazen new twenty-one-
gaw.old open golf champion of the
., ans two trips to Europe
Sa b next ear. The first oe
wif be this fall., He'll play over
the British links. ills second trip
. W be next summer to compete in
the British open tourney and try
for the title Walter Hagen now
holda.
SPIRIT OFGROWTH
CHANGES COLLEGE
Pres. Charles McHenny Says Normal
Is Being Transformed Into
Training School
SAYS A. B. DEGREE WILL BE
COMMON PROPERTY IN FUTURE
"The spirit of growth is the inspira-
tion behind the movement to trans
form Normal schools into Teachers'
colleges," said Pres. Charles McKen-
ny, of the Michigan tSate Normal col-
l'ege, in his talk yesterdiay afternoon
in Natural Science auditorium on "The
Teacher College Movement." Previ-
ous to the war, he said, teachers were
content to secure a life certificate but
since the war, a tremendous awaken-
ing has taken place and now the am-
bition on the part of teachers already
in the service for a better training is
becoming more and more prevalent.
The fact that there are 2,400 students
enrolled in the Normal college at Yp-
silanti, 1,700 of whom are teachers,
bears out this statement.
The fact that two-thirds of the 167
Normal schools in the United States
have changed within the past six
years from Normal schools to Teach-
ers' colleges which grant degrees,'
shows the impetus of the movement.
This movement, according to Prest-
dent Mcienny, is due to the same
impulse which is transforming the
high school into the Junior college
and is adding the Graduate school to
the university, the impulse to grow.
AI B. May Become Common
Normal schools were primarily, es-
tablished for students of limited
wealth. "In the near future everyone
will possess the degree of Bachelor
of Arts," said the speaker. It will be
the student who has had gradate
work who will receive distinction and
it is up to the Normal schools to pro-
vidp for undergraduate work cheaply.
President McKenny has computed flg-
ures showing that it is possible for a
student to attend the Normal school
at Ypsilanti for $200 less per year
that it costs for him to attend any
,other college in the country.
The speaker pointed out that recent-
ly the universities have been unable
to handle the l4rge numbers of stu-
dents who have flocked to their door
(Continued on Page Four)

(By Associated Press)
Washington, July 20.-Developmen
of plans for stretching out the nation
coal supply, now dwindling under co
tinued inpact of the mine and ra
strike, was' the immediate concern t
day of federal officials acting in ti
industrial situation. Secretary Hoo'
er announced that within a day or tv
the inter-state c merce commissi
and the commerce department' wou
put into operation a scheme of d
vertiig to essential transportati
lines the doal commanded from no:
union mines and those that may 1
opened up in union teritory, by u
of priority jorders, and governme:
transportation. The object will 1
the maintenance of the transportatic
machine.
Net in order for coal supply fro
the diminshed output it was In
cated, would be the Northern Gre
Lakes ports, and should it be foui
impossible to avert a shortage t
coal distribution plans might be e
panded to become a complete ratio
ing of supply to-'other industries a
territories, as their necessities mig
appear.
Shortage Certain
Attorney General Daughterty o
mented in connectiongwith this p
that the strike disruption had alrea
made it certain that there would be
coal shortage 'next winter.
Replies of governors to Preside
Harding's invitation that they guara
tee protection to mine operation i
spite of the strike continued to cot
to the White House, practically all. a
suring the federal government su
port..
State to Co-operate
Governors of Arkansas, Montn
Oregon, and Texas had not respond
tonight, while from Oklahoma an a
knowledgement of the White Uou
message was received saying that t
governor would reply later. Govern
Groesbeck, Michigan, outlined 'pla
for opening mines under state co
trol, with federal sanction, but co
ment was withheld.
The reports to government depa:
ments indicated that while trains a
still being withdrawn by railroads, t
movement of the snals and likewise
all necessities of life is continui
throughout the country.
SENATE SHOALS COMITTEE
FROWNS ON FORD OFF]
(By,Associated Press)
Washington, July 20.- Rejection
Henry Ford's offer for Muscle Sho;
and enactment of legislation for .
vlopment of the war built proj
in Alabama by a government o'r
and government controlled corpo:
tion was recommendod to the s
ate today by Chairman Norris, ofI
senate agriculture committee.
Graduate Accepts Library Posltni
Samuel McAllister, grad., has be
appointed head Ilbrariapi of the A
Arbor public library. McAllister
been in charge of graduate read:
room 1 for the past year. He s
ceods Miss Loving in the Ann Arl
library.

Phi Delta Kappa, a national educa-
tional fraternity, initiated five men
here Wednesday evening. Prof. T.
L. Purdom. the president of the local
chapter, Wray H. Condon and Harold
Brbwn, the secretaries, participated
in the ceremonies, which began at 4
o'clock. The secret work was follow-
ed by a banquet at the Union, with Mr.
Condon as toastmaster and Prof. G.
E. Corrothers of Cleveland, Ohio, G. H.
Alderman of Newton, Ia., and Prof.
Earl Hudelston of the University of
Wisconsin, as the speakers of the eve-
ning.
The initiates were Prof. C. S. Yoa-
kum, assistant professor of applied
psychology, , Carnegie Institute of
Technology, who is teaching at the
University this summer; Supt. Don
Harrington of Albion; Supt. M. R. Iey-
worth of Hastings, and Gale' E. Dina-
more of Mason, and Prof. Thomas Dia-
mond, of the University faculty.

Ten men have signed up for singl-
es and four for doubles matches in
the Summer session tennis tourna-
ment, according to Dr. George A. May,
of the physical education department.
This number of entries -i$ not suf-'
ficient to justify opening the tourna-
ment, and Dr. May urges anyone who
contemplates entering; the competi-
tion, to sign up this week. The tourn-
ament is open to students and facul-
ty members of the Summer session.

Riggs in New York
E. Riggs has left the
days' trip to New York
e Sulphur Springs, W.

_,

I

ER SPOTLIGHT...,

Thursday
NIll AUDIT 2
Be00 P. M

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