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September 19, 1957 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

loot I

'ortu

' Gets

PROBLEMS UNRESOLVE
Coeducation's

'atterns

'op'

1.

ersity researchers an-
Thursday that most
re in the market for
e at least once every
h the car owner be-'
sent model is in good
is still in the market
car.
aiger, Eva Mueler and
of the University's
search Center an-
ir findings at the
atistical. Association,
2.
eir 32-month survey,
of the families inter-
in the market for a
nce, 14 per cent twice
cent three times or
0, the researchers
ericans change cars

frequently, each time buying a car
which is only a few years newer
than the one they replace."
New car purchases, they said,
are planned more often than used
car buying but the rate of fulfill-
ment is about the same in each
case.
"Under the present liberal credit
terms,.' they added, "the antici-
pated method of financing does
not affect the fulfillment of plans.
A substantial change in credit
terms could alter this, however."
Most car owners believe their
machines were in excellent condi-
tion and most of the rest felt
their cars were in good shape.
Only two or three per cent
thought of their cars as "clunkers."
Most of those who felt their cars
were unsatisfactory soon pur-
chased a newer automobile.

$4,968
In Grant

A research grant of $4,968 for
the study of cerebral palsy has
been made to the Medical School's'
pharmacology department.
The grant, made by the United
Cerebral Palsy Association, is to be
used to study muscle relaxants.
Dr. Edward F. Domino, assistant
professor, of pharmacology, will
conduct the program.
Since 1949, almost J3,000,000 has
been allocated by the association
to further basic and clinical re-
search which will help train pro-
fessional personnel in their work
with cerebral palsy patients,

"Though women have ad
their public status at a di
* pace and have the worlda
feet, the problem of the
and content of their colleg
cation is still unresolved,"1
sity President Harlan Hatel
quoted in this week's is
Newsweek magazine.
Newsweek's statistics sh
dramatic pace in educati
3,400,000 students, 1,170,0
women. Only 189,000, or
cent, attend women's collei
Since World War II, me
leges have remained abo
same in number; all-wom
leges fell from 279 to 249
time. But in the same peri
educational institutions
from 1,202 to a high of 1,4
Strongest Outside Ea
The co-educational influ
'strongest outside the East,
for its tradition of separat
tutions.
The huge schools in th
west, the West and the
make co-education the
and expedient form of sch
the magazine asserts.
The "co-ord" innovation
tered in the East. In the pa
teen years, Radcliffe Colle
become increasingly coor
-Photo Courtesy University News Service with nearby Harvard, a
nard with Columbia. Moun
turing teeth by cutting them into slices oke, Smith and Bryn Maa
ted in plastic (as above, lower left) is undertaken coordinated pr
dental project here. with men's and co-ed insti

rvanced Vassar and Wellesley, completing
at their the Big Seven roster of women's
nature colleges, are holding -aloof from
ge edu- the trend. Commenting on in-
Univer- creased enrollment in women's
her was colleges, Vassar- ,President Sarah
ssue of q. Blanding contends: "This indi-
cates a trend toward the purely
ow the women's colleges, not away from
on:Ofhem
Yale and Princeton Aloof
22 are Of men's schools in the East,
es per Yale and Princeton remain non-
n'sa coordinated. Newsweek reported an
's col "huproar among the Eli's last year
ut the at the mere suggestion that women
ten cl- might breach their sacrosanct
at this walls." But it adds that ". . . most
iod, Co boys were looking at the prospect
leaped with some anticipation."
114.
An Illinois women's college, Mac-
st Murray, welcomed 130 men this
fence is fall and its president expects that
known -male enrollment will eventually
e insti- equal MacMurray's 600 women.
"The big news in higher educa-
ie Mid- tion this year is that, for reasons
South of efficiency, economy, and aca-
natural demic reward, more and more men
ooling," and women students are studying
s e together and liking it," Newsweek
is cen- said.
A four- Speaking further on co-educa-
ege has tr'on, President Hatcher is quoted
dinated asking, "What are we educating
d Bar- for? To what extent and degree is
t Holy- the national interest involved?,
gr have How much of the process and pur-
'ograms poses are individual and personal
tutions. to the fulfillment and happiness of
the student herself?"
- A/ vice-president of Michigan
State University had this to say:
". . . men simply recognize that
women have abilities that need to
be utilized, and education in all
fields is pretty readily accepted."

,"

"It certainly isn't partict
necessary in modern society
all women know how to coo
sew, or care for children."
Northwestern University f
women to be brighter. The I
of Men there reported a y
average grade for women as
against 2.31 for men. Cornell
University of California. are
reported as agreeing that "wi
are the better students."
An English professor (mal(
MacMurray College gives four
eral reasons in support of
phenomenon:
1) "Women are more i ag
ttve and emotional and hei
teTested more in self-express
2) "Women are inclined tc
cept the instructor's pronou
ments as supreme authority
Men are inclined to challenge
matic statements and are al
asking the question why."
3) Women are less aggressi
presenting their ideas, and
mixed class they remain s
while men monopolize the di
sions."
4) "Women are more sen
to criticism, sometimes feeling
a dissatisfaction with work in
a dislike of them personally.
'Health Servi(
'Adds, Doctor;
The medical staff of H
Service now has 11 full time
tors with the addition of four
appointments ma4e during
summer.
Dr. Morley Beckett, dire
announced the one-year app
ments of Dr. Theresa T. Woc
Dr. Edmund H. Whale as c
physicians and Dr. Melvin L.
zer as an associate psychiatr
Dr. C. Frank Knox, Jr.
serve as an assistanit psychia

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Peculiar Insulation
The president of University of
Massachusetts felt that "in the
past programs have been geared
for a peculiar insulation of Jim
Thurber's moral that 'woman's
place is in the home, but the male's
place is to lie and roam'.

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