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January 15, 1958 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-01-15
Note:
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Ali

Jul

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at Reasonable Prices
WALK A FEW STEPS
AND
SAVE DOLLARS

The Jacobs Report Evaluated

It survived lean budgets for almost eighty years,
But willsuccumb to Progress next morth

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STUDY RELAXED!,
Prepare for Those
Long Cramming Sessions-with
A Fine Pipe
OPEN 'TIL 9 P.M.
PIPE CENTER
118 East Huron --- Opposite County Bldg. -- Ph. NO 3-623 6

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CHANGING VALUES ,1N
CQLLEGE. By Prof. Philipj
E. Jacob. New. -York, 1957:
Harper and Brothers. 174
pp. $3.50.a
By PHILIP MUNCK
Daily Staff Writer
IT SEJEMS probable that from'
the dawn of time, mankind has
looked to the younger generation.
to solve the cares of the world.
Today, with international prob-
lems *and tensions at an all time
high, the new generation of lead-
ers graduating from America's
colleges and universities faces a
bewildering host of c o m p 1 e x
tangles to unscramble.
How will the college students
of today react when they reach
positions of responsibility in the
near future? If the answer lies
in the beliefs, attitudes and drives
of these students while they are
in college, Changing Values in Col-
lege by Prof. Philip E. Jacob of the
University of Pennsylvania pr.e-
sents a dismal picture of the
future.
THE PICTURE of college stu-
dents as liberal, independent
thinkers using college to choose
and fix their outlooks and atti-
tudes is misleading, if not totally
incorrect, according to Prof. Ja-
cob's study.. His book shows that
students are gloriously contented,
and self-centered. They are not-
liberalized by the college experi-
ence but are merely socialized,
These are shocking statements,
and will draw quick and bitter,
criticism from those students who
believe American colleges to be the
embodiment of liberal and inde-
pendent t h o u g h t. Nevertheless,
this is no immature, half-hearted
study-the material from which
Prof. Jacob has drawn his con-
clusions is impressive both from
the standpoint of the number of
students included and from the
survey's diversity and compre-
hensiveness.
When he released a preliminary
summary of his findings last
spring, critics had a valid point
in citing the lack of statistical
support for his ideas. But-the "In-
ventory of the Data" includes 354
different studies and surveys used
in the book-sufficient informa-
tion to support his arguments.
The only grounds left for criticism
of the conclusions is in his inter-
pretation of available facts.

THE STATISTICAL information
included .with the text of his
findings is satisfactory and, while
he is= too emphatic in his state-
ments at times, the truth of the
conclusions is evident. The sad,
unfortunate fact is that, to the
average student, college is an
idealized trade school. It is a place,
where one acquires skills necessary
to earn a living and to associate
with his peers.,
Prof. Jacob inquires into these
changes in values on both ttle cur-
ricular and social levels. The only
thing left cut of the book is an
explanation of the sources of these
attitudes.
NE P O S S I B L E explanation
comes from Reisman's con-
ception of three-staged society.
Reisman divided social develop-
ment into a "tradition directed"
stage, which emphasizes family
and tribal ties; an "inner directed"
stage which is dynamic and in-
dividualistic; and an "other direct-
ed" society in which the enfphasis
is on living harmoniously with
one's fellows. If the United States
is entering such an "other direct-
ed" form of society, one explana-
tion for student conformity can be
explained.
Prof. Jacob's study offers a great
deal of support to this theory. One
of the outstanding conclusions
reached in his book is that college
student's values are remarkably
similar to those of other students
in their own colleges and to all
college students, "regardless of lo-
cation, administration, size and
background of the .students body,
or character of the educational
program."
MOST STUDENTS, he finds, are
self-confident. They believe
the individual has control of his
own destiny, that "knowing peo-
ple" is important to success, and
that their lives will be "happy and
long." .At the same time, the stu-
dent is quite self-centered and
feels that his first duty in society
is to protect and provide for him-
self and his family.
The average student, Prof. Ja-
cob continues, believes in the here-
after but doesn't let religious
philosophy extend into his per-
sonal life. Although tolerant to-
u s u a 11 y holds to conventional
moral standards.
For the most part, college stu-
dents have no desire to take on
See JACOBS, Page 15

(Cont-nued from Page 7)
Other donations to the museum
had to be declined because of the
fear of fire and the uselessness of
storing them. The Regents then
decided to build the present Mu-
seums Building, which was even-
tually completed in 1928.'
Before the present Romance
Languages departments crowded
in, the building underwent major
surgery, as the large display rooms
were converted into classrooms.
The price of extensive alperations
in 1928 amounted to half the cost
of the building, -$20,000. It was
th - n that the now flaking and fa-

miliar gray dress was painted on
the outside of the building.
Nostalgic professors who have
watched the time-scarred edifice
age cite its advantageous position
on campus as a reason to retain
the building for classrooms or a
study hall. But the sum needed to-
restore the weary structure would
far exceed the original construc-
tion cost.'
THE GREATEST fear the build-
ing poses to University officials
is its hazard as a firetrap. Admin-
istrators still remember the devas-
-tating fire that destroyed old-Ha-
ven Hall in 1950.

Blending drearily with the leaf-
less trees of 'winter, dark green
moss now colors the north side of
the imposing tower. It seems as if
nature is making a last claim on
its 78-year-old friend.
The Romance Languages Build-
Yng was not always looked upon
as an anachronism. At its com-
pletion in 1880, the bi-weekly
campus newspaper, The Chronicle,,
described it this way: "When you
go up to the second floor . . . you
will say just as all who have seen
the rooms do say . . . our museum
will be a pride to the University
and to the state."

However, as a sign of the times,
another writer in the same issue
of the paper predicted that the
newly-installed system of co-edu-
cation would not survive at the
University because grueling col-
lege work was too much of a tax
on the health of women.
At that early date students felt
that "you cannot build a sixty
thousand dollar building for forty
thousand dollars." The effects of
the shortage_ have remained ever
since. The abandoned elevator
shaft serves as storage space and
the tower stands divorced of its
clocks.
THE GENERAL plan of the an-
tiquated building, for each
story except the attic, comprises
a central corridor and wings.
Since there has always been lack
of adequate space, the main door
of the structure was sealed to
provide additional office room.
With the gray paint gradually
giving way to the original red
brick, the Romance Language
Building has the distinction of
being the third oldest structure
on campus and the foremost ha-
ven for pigeons. Only the Presi-
dent's house, the Observatory and
the Economics Building are older.
On a gusty day the wind plays
eerie tunes in the now-empty cor-
ridors and rooms. This is perhaps
why one French instructor com-
mented, "I love the building, but

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get ready for Spring

MAGAZINE
Wednesday, January

Vol. IV, No. 4

15, 1958

$4 95

for

Next Semester's

Step Into the store, next
timo you're downtown, and
step out In the most comfortable
Casuals you've ever met... Evans
Casuals. You'll find the new Evans
Casuals Osfriendly with your
pocketbook as they ore w
with your feet,

NATURAL
BUCK

DAILY

CONTENTS
COLLEGE VALUES .........PhilIp Munck
'THE LIVELIEST ART' . ....Burton Beerman
HOMAGE TO BREDVOLD . Thornton Parsons
SAILOR'S LIFE.............Thomas Blues
IN MEMORIAM, R.L.B..... Ronald Kotulak
'LOOK BACK!IN ANGER' . .Judith Silverman
MAINE & THE ARTIST ..'...Michael Kraft'
PABLO PICASSO ...........R. C. Gregory
JOSEPH CONRAD ........... R. C. Gregory
JAZZ HANDBOOK ...........Philip Munck

Page 2
Page 3
Page 6
Page 6
Page 7
Page. 8
Page 10
Page 11
Page 12
Page 13

Gay Gibson's wonderful dacron and
cotton charmer. Shirtdress interest
created by tiny horizontal tucking

cruise or afternoon tour with

You're packed and ready for a quick

Are Being Taken
NOW TH RUl

and lace inset at bodice.

II

Junior sizes.

FINALS

MAGAZINE EDITOR: Tammy Morrison
MAGAZINE PHOTOGRAPHER: Bud Bentley
PICTURE CREDITS-Cover: Picasso made "Le Repay Frugal" ("The
Frugal Meal"), a drypoint-and-etching. on zinc, -in 1904, when
he was 24. Considered one of his best works in this medium, "Le
Repas Frugal" has been widely reproduced. Photograph of the

22.95

This picture frarn
reserved f(
This empty frame
in the dress of
chosen just
Picture yourself in
or soft chiffon
yourself in
-or sparkling print,
see what's wa it
FOR T OWN A
302 South S

I1 9

Call NO 2-3241
Any Day
Between

I

Sizes
7 to 12

print in the Alfred Stielglitz Collection was provic
Institute of Chicago; Page 3: Photograph courtesyc
Ian Co.; Page 4: Daily photograph by MalcolmS
Daily photograph by Eric Arnold; Page 8: Photc
Ronald Muchnick; Page 10: Photographs by Micha
11: Photographs courtesy Museum of Modern'Art;
tispiece from "Joseoh Conrad" by Oliver Warn

by The Art
he Macmil-.
tz; Page 7:
ph courtesy

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4AIN AT LIBERTY ANN ARBOR
the Finest Quality at Prices that are Fair

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