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January 15, 1958 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-01-15

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Sixty-Eighth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. * ANN ARBOR, MIcH. * Phone NO 2-3241

"Why, No-I Haven't Been Sitting On That Report"

mvwmm rr

pinions Are Free
Wil Prevail"

. '9M
-

First Semester
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE AP
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STU]
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC

printed in The Michigan Daily ex press the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This mus t be noted in all reprints.

JANUARY 15, 1958

NIGHT EDITOR: THOMAS BLUES

r

Freshman English
Begs Reappraisal

January 17 to January 28,

1958

E UNIVERSITY is in dire need 4f an
ppraisal and reorganization of English 23,
first semester freshman English course.
is the one course at the University of
igan that every freshman in literary
ge is required to take, and yet proves in-
uate to the needs of the students..
ught in a cross-fire between making Eng-
23 either a composition or literature course,
English department succeeds very nicely
rriving at neither. Instead, students are
i a small taste of each, composition prob-
being the bigger bite. The result is practi-
nil in terms of benefit to the students.
e course is described in the Announcement
le Literature, Science and Arts College as
ritical analysis of various types of prose,
the writing of essays, largely expository,
the aim of developing the student's ability
:press himself clearly and cogently." This
d be all that we could wish. However,
>ugh the means used are the same as
ribed-that is a critical analysis of prose
the writing of essays-the small amount of
apportioned to the student makes it vir-
y impossible for most to achieve the
ed end.
:ain, referring back to what the course is
ned to be, the Announcement states that
.cludes" analyzing various types of prose.
ems that the word "various" was overlooked
n text books for the subject were being
en. Sele'cted was one book, an excellent
iology entitled "The Province of Prose,"
h contains approximately 90 essays. We
not heard of other types of prose being;
the ninety essays in the book, only about
ty are read by most classes. Outside read-
s ;seldom assigned. It seems, too, that the
ciples used in writing are generally stressed
uch a degree, that the content of the
vs is completely ignored. '
m outside papers and approximately six

impromptu compositions is the average for
most classes. In number of papers this is not
too far from what it should be. In number of
words, however, it does not approach the effec-
tual. A paper of 500 to 700 words is assigned
at the beginnig of the $erm, and the student
works up to the point where he is writing 800
to 1000 words per paper. The last paper, a
source theme for most, reaches the daring total
of 1200 to 1500 words.
CERTAINLY one would be wrong to say that
thi4 is not progress. Nevertheless, it is not
progress enough. There is no conceivable reason
why a freshman in college should not be ex-
pected to write a source paper of 3,000 words,
and ordin~ary themes, by the knd of the term,
should be reaching the 1500-word mark.
Longer papers would be less difficult to write,
if impromptus were given each week. This
would give the student practice in organizing
his thoughts and his writing in a minimum of
tme. Consequently he would produce not only
longer, but probably better organized compo-
sitions.
We suggest the faculty give consideration to
freshman English courses at other major coI-
leges and universities to see the shortcomings
of English 23. At Wayne State University there
is no one text, as such, but many essays and
several novels are read, both for ideas professed
and literary style.
Should the University decide to revise this
English course, we feel the majority of stu-
dents would be in favor of the idea. Although
a school has no cut and dried obligation to its
students, it does have an obligation to provide
them with as much of the most effective in-
struction as possible. If most students find they
are not getting what they desire from some
phase of college, then an effort should be made
by both student and administration to promote
a change.
-JUDY DONER

For courses having both lectures and recitations the
of claMs" is the time of the first lecture period of the week
courses having recitation only, the "time of class" is the
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be exan
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule o:
special periods may use any examination period provided
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the co:
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular sche
Each student should receive notification from his instr
as to the time and place of his examination.

REGULAR SCHEDULE

Time of Class
at
at
at
at
MONDAY at
at
at
at

*
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Time of Examination
Monday, January 20
Friday, January 24
Friday, January 17
Wednesday, January 22
Monday, January 27
Monday, January 27
Saturday, January 18
Tuesday, January 21
Tuesday, January 21
Saturday, January 25
Saturday, January 1
Thursday,. January 23
Friday, January 24
Saturday, January 25
Thursday, January 23

9-
9-
9-
9-
9-
9-

TUESDAY

at
at
at
at
at
at
at

t

tc95si s -t s ,a &s c-..y) PO-r 4-

* Classes beginning on the
preceding hour.

half hour will be scheduled at

AT THE MICHIGAN:
Pal Joe'Simple but Boring

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

To Rush or Not .. .

AST MONTH over, 1400 independent women
registered for rushing, deciding to give the
liated side of campus life the onceover.
Vomen rush and pledge for many reasons-
>seness and the traditions a small group
ngs, social prestige, and curiosity to see the
Ler side or to meet new people.
Many will rush with mistaken impressions of
ority life. They have heard of only the
>erficial side-the high standards and ideals
good scholarship and citizenship.
t can also be said a sorority is a small "com-
tible" group where one may find and 'make
ends-usually of similar background. It is
comfortable home, one which offers security,
ial "experience," alumnae contacts, a chance
learn to live with a small group and to
rticipate in house and campus activities.
pposedly it develops leadership and respon-
iity.
But most, if not all women who rush don't
alize exactly what they are getting into. They
lld up a desire to "get in" and don't question

a sorority's advantages and their application
to themselves.
THERE ARE MANY pressures on the indi-
vidual to conform in attitude, thinking,
behavior and dress. Unless one makes a definite
effort it is easy to narrow one's hofizons, to
limit one's self to the affiliated side of campus
and not take advantage of the very diverse and
broadening people and activities found else-
where on campus.
Privacy is another consideration. A little
solitude is almost impossible to attain. Demands
are made on your time-planning and attend-t
ing social functions, meetings and the like eat
into both your spare and study time.
Joining a sorority is a real responsibility. To
get anything out of a sorority one must put a
great deal in. It takes time, effort and perser-
verence.
Throughout the period before and during
rush women should think about their decisions
carefully. The pledge is a definite commitment.
Make it your own.
-ELIZABETH ERSKINE

FOR.Amusical, "Pal Joey" is one
of the dullest films to come
out of Hollywood in several years.
From beginning to end, this
lengthy distortion of the Rodgers
and Hart musical barely drags it-
self from musical number to mu-
sical number, depending on a
c o m b i n a t io n of poorly-staged
songs and bedroom comedy to
hold the viewer's attention.
The attitude of the whole film
is caught up in the single scene
where Joey, a so-so night club-
singer-emcee, does a song at a
society benefit to earn a couple
extra bucks. He's bored, and
"There's a Small Hotel" (one of
the more delightful songs from
the show) comes out bored.
* * *
VERA, the hostess, is bored, too;
her husband has been dead for
two years and she hasn't found a
replacement yet.
Linda, who's a step ahead of
Vera id having already noticed
the handsome Joey, is sitting in
the corner watching and panting.
Well, although they try to act dif-
ferently, ,Joey and Vera never get
over their boredom and Linda
never stops panting.
Socialite Vera (Rita Hayworth)
finally makes up her mind,
though, and takes Joey (Frank
Sinatra) home to her yacht. In
return for erasing her boredom
she plans to open Joey his own
night club, the Chez Joey.
But when Linda (Kim Novak)

shows up in one of the acts, still
panting, Vera is suspicious - es-
pecially when she sees Joey, who's
more bored than ever, panting
back. Since Vera figures that Joey
is hers no longer, she closes the
Chez Joey and resigns herself to
boredom again.
Then, in a typical Hollywood
ending, Vera brings Linda and
Joey together and the happy
couple run down Nob Hill away
from the rich society people, to-
ward the Golden Gate Bridge and
Happiness.
* * *
WHERE "Pal Joey" resembles
the original musical of the early
Theray
"flERE'S your bottle, what's
your trouble?" may soon be
the bartender's standard greeting.
Bartenders, according to a Cali-
fornia Department of Public
Health official, can be as useful
in mental health work as profes-
sional psychiatrists.
In fact, the doctor thinks the
bartender might be in a better
position than the minister, teach-
er or lawyer to dispense helpful
advice. Seems he helps people un-
load their troubles by listening to
them talk them out.
Of course, the doctor isn't wor-
ried about whether they exchange
one load for another.
-Clipsheet

1940's, the resemblance seems al-
most coincidental. The Lorentz
Hart lyrics have been washed
clean in those songs that remain
with the show, and many other
numbers have been omitted.
To make up for the loss, at least
one other song ("My Funny Val-
entine") was swiped from a dif-
ferent Rodgers and hart musical
while modern versions of the in-
nuendo -and off-color material
(which all College Students will
appreciate) were arranged to pro-
vide connecting dialogue between
the musical numbers.

Botany 2
Chemistry 3, 5E, 15, 182
Economics 71, 72
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 153
English 23, 24
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 21, 31, 32
Geology 11
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 35,
Physics 53
Psychology 190
,Russian 1, 31
Sociology 1, 4, 60
Spanish 1, 2, 21, 31, 32
Naval Science 101, 201, 301,
301M, 3015, 401, 401M,
40'18

.. - .. . s.a av .. aw u w+:v a. as

Monday, January 20
Monday, January 27
Thursday, January 23
Saturday, January 25
Friday, January 17
Tuesday, January 28"
Monday, January 20
Wednesday, January 22
Thursday, January 23
Friday, January 17
Tuesday, January 28,
Tuesday, January 28
Wednesday, January 22

2-5
2-3
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5

Thursday, January 23 7-10

*

*

FRANK SINATRA is now an
old hand at playing broken-down
musicians, and that he does again.
Rita Hayworth acts her age in
just another part for her on the
"comeback" trail. Kim Novak is'
. well . . . she really doesn't
have to say anything.
"Pal Joey" does have its amus-
ing moments, however. Vera's
strip number is fine Rodgers and
Hart, Linda's strip number is
quaint, and Vera's shower bath
number is the familiar "Be-
witched, B o t h e re d and' Be-
wildered" in, of course, an
abridged version. Linda . doesn't
sing in her bathtub scene.
Staging for the musical num-
bers is unimpressive, although for
once we are spared any lavish
"spectacular" productions. "Pal
Joey" is simplicity in everything
from plot to clothing.
-Vernon Nahrgang

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Bus. Ad. 11, 12 Thursday, January 23 2-5

COLLEGE
Ch.-Met. 1, Lee B and D'
Ch.-Met. 11
C. E. 21, 151
C. E. 22
C. E. 133, 141'
Drawing 1, 33
Drawing 2, 21
Drawing 11
E. E. 5
E. M.1
E. M.2
English 11
I. E. 100, 120 J
M. E. 2
M. E. 132
Naval Science 101, 201, 301,
301M, 301S, 401, 401M,
4018

OF ENGINEERING
Tuesday, January 28,
Tuesday, January 28
Friday, January 17
Wednesday, January 22
Tuesday, January 21
Monday, January 20
Wednesday, January 22
Tuesday, January 28
Monday, January 20
Friday, January 17
Wednesday, January 22
Friday, January 17
Friday, January 17
Thursday, January 23
Wednesday, January 22

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5,

Thursday, January 23 '7-10

w r

INTERPRETING THE NEWS:

Ik'es Foreign Policy

UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARY:
'New Perspective in Liberal Education'

By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER'
WASHINGTON (A)-When President Eisen-
hower took over direction of the nation's
oreign affairs five years ago he pledged himself
o work out a policy which would be clear,
onsistent and' coherent. He is still trying to
ulfill, that pledge.
The is ue of peacemaking has been compli-
ated by Russia's striking gains in the new
veapons of the space age. But the most note-
vorthy difference between the situation five,
ears ago and that of today is not to be found
n the tasks demanding effective presidential
eadership for power and peace. Rather it lies
n the widespread doubt among allies and neu-
rals alike as to whether Eisenhower and
ecretary of State Dulles are still capable of
.elivering that leadership.
Five years ago Eisenhower was the knight
1 shining armor, not only for millions of
Lmericans but for millions of desperately hope-
il citizens of other lands.
Editorial Staff
PETER ECKSTEIN, Editor
JAMES ELSMAN, JR. VERNON NAHRGANG
Editorial Director City Editor
ONNA HANSON........... Personnel Director
AMMY MORRISON........... . ..... Magazine Editor,
DWARD GERULDSEN .. Associate Editorial Director
ILLIAM HANEY..................Features Editor
ASE PERLBERG................. Activities Editor
AROL PRINS ........ Associate Personnel Director
AMES BAAD ............Sports Editor
RUCE BENNETT.............Associate Sports Editor

Today, after three serious illnesses, he has
shown weariness, has shunned bold tactical
moves and has proclaimed generalities as policy
on many occasions. Allies and friends wonder
whether he-and they-are not being outrun
by the Russians; whether in fact the President
is really moving American and Free 'World
policy forward at all.
UNITED STATES atomic power remains the
great deterrent against any massive attack
by the Soviet Union, but confidence in this
deterrent beyond the next year or so has been
shaken by Russia's progress in the field of
long range missiles.
At the close of their fifth year of running
foreign affairs, Eisenhower and Dulles face
probably their greatest challenge. It is to re-,
assert United States military scientific suprem-
acy, rally allied confidence in U.S. leadership
and persuade Congress to vote the foreign aid
funds and atomic secrecy relaxation they con-
sider necessary.
The Eisenhower-Dulles handling of foreign
affairs has not always appeared to follow a
clear policy in the judgment of its critics, and
even its friends have sometimes been hard
pressed to fit actions and statements into a
consistent and coherent global design.
The most difficult task of statesmanship
which has burdened Eisenhower and Dulles
has been the task of trying to hold together a
loose military alliance against the Soviet Union
while simultaneously holding the door open to
negotiations for a settlement with Russia. The
problem is almost a contradiction in terms.
When fears of Russia go up, the alliance
pulls together: when Russia's smile warms the

By R. C. GREGORY
"HERE IS in the British Mu-
seum an enormous mind.
Consider that Plato is there
cheek, by jowl with Aristotle;
and Shakespeare with Marlowe.
This great mind is hoarded be-
yond the power of any single
mind to possess it.
Nevertheless . . . one can't
help thinking how one might
come with a notebook, sit at a
desk, and read it all through.
.And then there is science,
pictures, architecture-an enor-
mous mind." (Virginia Woolf:
"Jacob's Room.")
THURSDAY, January 16, 1958,
at 8 a.m., President Hatcher
will turn a key in the door of the
new Undergraduate Library, offi-
cially opening the building. The
new building will undoubtedly have
many visitors in its first days, for
it is unlikely that even semester
examinations can overwhelm the
human quality of curiosity; one
would hope curiosity can not be
subdued easily, else there would
be small reason for any library,
to say nothing of a new one.
* * *
VISITORS WILL find much to
satisfy their curiousity., Vast
amounts of study space are there,
in a variety of forms: single occu-
pant desks, lounge facilities on the
east side of each room, and group
study rooms on the west side.
There will be found excellent

Telephones are plentiful, and
coin operated typewriters; lockers
will be available for students who
want 'to bring, and leave, their
own typewriters. A multi-purpose
room on the third level will make
possible various kinds of audio-
visual programs.
The building is air-conditioned
throughout. Little, one thinks, has
been forgotten, and anyone who
regularly studies at the General
Library cannot but applaud the,
expanded-and expandable-facil-
ities.
~ There would be sufficient justi-
fication for the building - open
from 8 a.m. until 12 p.m. Monday
through Friday, from 8 a.m. until
6 p.m. on Saturdays, and from 2
p.m. until 12 p.m. on Sundays--
simply-on the basis of study space
and expanded hours. But curios-
ity, being human, has been antici-
pated: there is a book 'collection.
THE FUNDAMENTAL fact, the
only real reason, for the existence
of the Undergraduate Library must
be found on, its shelves. Were the
book collection to- reflect only
course reading requirements, it
would lack cohesiveness; this is
not to say that "textbooks" will
not be there; it is, rather, to say
that they are but a fraction of the
total number.
Nor is the collection merely
many copies of titles on outside:
reading lists plus the obvious
reference works to which students

The collection of 50,000 books
s contains most all worthwhile books
known to Western Man: novels,
histories, dramas, philosophies,
sciences, poetries, political theories,
encyclopedias, diaries, economic
systems, letters, journals, psychol-
ogies, theologies, and the many
titles that are none of these and
yet are books which criticism and
conscience elect. How many forms
takes the Spirit of Man?
The book collection, housed on
shelves through which the reader
may browse freely, represents an
enormous act of criticism on the
past and the present, for it was
lassembly title bi title. Guideposts
there were, obvious ones, but rec-
ognizing only guideposts would
have obscured any prospect - of
man as he really has been and any
vision of what he can be.
* * *
THE BOOK collection of the
Undergraduate Library, indeed,
the whole concept of such a 11
brary, opens a new perspective in
the University's programs in lib-
eral education. Students and fac-
ulty have never underestimated
the importance of books, but what
effects will the physical proximity
and availability of suchraibook
collection have on this and suc-
ceeding generations of students?
The heavy influx of World War
II veterans was the last great
innovation in undergraduate edu-
cation at Michigan; it changed

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF -ENGINEERINq
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
See bulletin board outside Room 301 W. E. between December 10
and 20 for instructions.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board of the School of Music.

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLLGE-OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC

10

Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any nt
sary changes, will be indicated on the School bulletin board
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLEI'

(Continued from Page 3)
west end
PUBLIC HEALTH-Room 2004
SOCIAL WORK-Room 2004 (be-
hind Public Health)
SECTION C-ENGINEERING-Room
2082
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION --
Room 2071
LAW,-Room 2033
PHARMACY--Room 2033 (belilnd.,

Office of the Dean, Room 10
ham Building.
Rackham School'of Graduate
East Gallery, Mezzanine Floor
ings by Younger Europeans," e
circulated by The American F
of Arts, shown under the au
the Museum of Art; Jan. 15 thi
Hours: Jan. 15, 8-10 p.m. Tx
Mon. through Fri., 1 to 5 p.m
p.m.; Sat. 1 to 5 p.,ii.; closed

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