100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 12, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1958-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TT M1ITTAN D1ATTV

tre Notes

LS&A SPRING PLANS:
College Offers Students Greater Variety of Courses

I

f r ,. .:.

I

AL J

PIZZA

JUNKER
re will have

its

e Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
'the Broadway musical
success, "Guys and Dolls,"
ay, Friday and Saturday.
Jeusel will direct the per-
es in the Lydia Mendels-
heatre, working with his
35. Sky Masterson, played
Kokales, and Nathan De-
rtrayed by Ken MacDon-
re gamblers-about-town,
anice Bruckner as Ade-
in the position of "al-
fiancee, never a bride."
world characters by Da-
unyon combined with the
y musical score by Frank
provide an enjoyable, New
rama Critics Award-win-
evening's entertainment.
will be on sale starting
m at the Lydia Mendels-
x office.
ts for the next Civic
presentationnHarriet
s'' Hopwood Award win-
[amine," will be held Jan.
21. The play, which won
pwood two years ago, will
ented Feb. 13, 14 and 15.
interested in a role in the
on can contact Heusel or
the meetings at Ann Arbor
chool beginning at 8 p.m.
'Waltz'. to Open
it theatres will change
oductions this week. Open-
morrow at the Shubert
will be "The Waltz of
)readors" by the French
ght Jean Anouilh. With a
st since its appearance on]
ay last season, this "gen-
uproarious sex comedy"
elvyn Douglas and Paul-
ddard with Lill Darvas.'-
story concerns an aging
who has gotten his sec-
id, and his problems with
ys-tired wife and two bor-
ghters. The Drama Critics
winner will be at the Shu-
a two-week run. The show
urn to Broadway in the
hakespeare in Texas
espeare's comedy, "Much
bout Nothing," with the
i changed from Italy to
will open Tuesday at the
Theatre in Detroit. Kath-]
:epburn and Alfred Drake
ar with the American
peare Festival. Company
two-week run.
scussing the story's change
e, Director John Houseman
d that "you can take a
approach to' Shakespeare,
z shouldn't get fresh with
peare." When he dis-
a new approach to the
le comedy for last sum-
estival, Miss Hepburn sug-
the story be set in south-
as about the year 1945.
ugh this has raised a furor
ecamps, the director said,

it has worked out well without
losing the "inimitabl'e Shakespear-
ian spirit. Dogberry, the constable,
for instance, becomes the essence
of all the bumbling sheriffs of the
old West," he observed. A Phila-
delphia reviewer has termed the
production, "Shakespeare at the
OK Corral."
World Premiere
,The world premiere of a Broad-
way-slated show will be held at
the Schubert Theatre on Jan. 30
'When Errol Flynn appears in "The
Master of Thornfield."' The play
is an adaptation by Huntington
Hartford of Charlotte Bronte's
"Jane Eyre."
Jan Brooks will appear as Jane
Eyre during the play's 10-day be-
troit run, which will also mark
Flynn's first appearance on the
American stage. A member of Bri-
tain's House of Lords, Lord Adrian
Foley, will also appear in the cast.
Opening tomorrow at the Capi-
tol Theatre in Wondsor, Ontario,
for a one-week run will be McGill
University's satire, "My Fur
Lady." Advertised for "Canadians

(Continued from Page 1)
viewing, Prof. Stowe will have hs
students study specific countries
by interviewing foreign students
on campus. This approach will be
supplemented by collateral read-
ing..
As a long-planned addition to
the advertising sequence within
the department, Journalism 177,
Advertisement Writing for Broad-
cast Media, will be offered for the
first time. Formerly this material
was included in another advertis-
ing class.
Journalism 201, Research Meth-
ods in Journalism, will follow
Journalism 200, and cover prob-
lems and methods of content
analysis, survey research and lab-
oratory studies. It will be taught
by Prof. Charles F. Cannell of the
department.
Romance Languages Depart-
ment has added two new French
courses. French 160, Existential
Literature, will cover the works
of Sartre, de Beauvoir and others,
with discussion emphasizing the
"theory of the literature."
The only prerequisite is pro-
ficiency in writing and speaking
French in which the course will be
conducted. Prof. Jean Carduner
of Romance Languages will teach
the course.
French Stylistics, French 175, is
also new. It will be taught by
Michel Benamou of the Romance
Languages staff.
The Department of Anthro-
pology is offering two new courses
for the Spring seinester, Anthro-
pology 237, Populatin Genetics,
will be taught by Prof. James N.
Spuhler.
"Population genetics is the study
of the ways in which gene fre-
quencies change in population,"
Prof. Spuher explained. "Al-
though it's . not principally a
statistical course, we will develop
a statistical theory of evolution."
Anthropology 168, Introduction
to Archedlogy in the New World,
is the second half of Anthropology
167, which was offered this se-
mester.
The psychology department has
added three courses for upper-
classmen. Psychology 113, The
Psychology of Music, will be
taught by Prof. Carl Brown.
Psychology 12 Theory of Psy-
chopathology, will enable students
to see the problems involved in
Name North
Campus Hall
After White
The Regents gave their approv-
al yesterday to the naming of the
auditorium in the Mortimer E.
Cooley Building on North Campus
as the Albert Easton White Audi-
toriumi.-
Prof. White, who died Dec. 18,
1956, at the age of 72, was the first
director of what is now the Engi-
neering Research Institute, a po-
sition which he held for 33 years
until his retirement in 1953.
In recon nending the action,
Acting Dean S. S. Attwood of the
College of Engineering said, "It is
hoped that this designation may
be made to serve as a tribute to
his /many outstanding achieve-
ments, and as an expression of
our gratitude for his wise guid-
ance and many contributions to
the dpvelopment of our research
activities."

clinical research, according to
Prof. Justin Weiss, who will teach
it. Its major concern is with ab-
normal psychology,
Psychology 247. Clinical Man-
agement of Disturbed Children, is
being presented in cooperation
with the education school.
Limited to 16 people, the course
will give first preference to those
currently working with disturbed
children. Second preference will
go to future counsellors at the
University Fresh Air Camp for
Disturbed Children workshop on
Human Behavior. .
Professors Elton McNeil and
William Morse will teach the
course.
The Classical Studies depart-
ment is offering two new courses
for the Spring semester. Latin 24,
not listed in the catalog, is a spe-
cial course in reading Latin poetry.
Latin 22 must be taken this se-
mester.
Latin 168, Studies in Roman
Religion, to be taught by John A.
Hanson, will replace the study of
Pompeii.
A University political scientist
and a visiting psychologist from
Lebanon will collaborate this se-
mester to teach a course "probably
unique in the world."
According to Prof. George Cam-
eron, chairman of the Near East-

ern studies department, the pro-
seminar in Middle Eastern polit-
ical institutions promises to be a
"fascinating" study of personality
and politics in that area.
The course actually is a part
of the political science curriculum,
Prof. Cameron said, but falls also
in the sphere of Near Eastern
studies.
Prof. E. T. Prothero, from the
University of Beirut, will head the
psychological side of the course,
while Prof. George L. Grassmuck,
of the University political science
department will assist with the
political aspects, Prof. Cameron
explained.
Four literary college science de-
partments have collaborated to
establish a pair of seminars form
the National Science Foundation's
Academic Year Institute.
Fifty high school science and
mathematics teachers have been
selected from the nation at large
for the Institute.
Prof. Leigh Anderson, chairman
of the chemistry department, and
Prof. W. Wallace McCormick of
the physics department will teach
Chemistry or Physics 122. Prof.
William Dawson and Prof. Charles
Beck of the botany department
will teach the second seminar,
Zoology or Botany 185.

The library science department
is offering no new courses this
semester, but two offered only in
summer session are now avail-
able.
Library Science 142 is Curricu-
lum Materials in the School Li-
brary. Library Science 264 is Story
Telling.

Quickie Chickie will deliver their IMPROVED, fr
from their new ovens, real ITALIAN PIZZA.

I

CALL NO 2-9944

k .FREE DELI

,

SPEC

L

Il

TEN

TB@

11

SE..

CE

For that vacation
- in the South,
hack home, or just
COy TTOY staying in A. A*

for

PRE-CLASSIFIED STUDENTS

JUNE-IN-JANUARY COTTONS

' JOSE GRECO
.. . here tomorrow
Onl and Sympathizers," the mu-
sical satire based on a recent
Broadwayrshow has played to full
houses across Canada, including
15 weeks in Montreal.
Coming Entertainment
Jose Greco and his company of
Spanish dancers will appear to-
morrow at the Michigan Theatre.
The program will begin, at 8:30
pam. Greco and his troupe have
appeared'in "Around the World in
80 Days," and have been seen fre-
quently on television. lHe will ap-
pear in Detroit, Feb. 1.at the Ma-
sonic Auditorium.
Victor Burge will bring his one-
man show to Detroit's Masonic
Auditorium on Jan. 25. This show
ran three years on Broadway and
was hailed by the critics as a mas-
terpiece of humor. "Comedy in
Music" will be in Detroit for only
one performance.

SATIN COTTON..

DACRON AND
PIMA COTTON
KNIT COTT
Drip 'n Dry wor
need little or no
You'll love the IsL
ors in solids, prin
and Stripes. You']
prices, too, from

COTTONS
VS . . .
ONS
rders that
>i ran ing.
ucious col-
ts, checks
11 love the
10.95
f .5

Reserve Books This EASY Way-
AVOID the usual RUSH crowds and waiting
lines. Fill in this schedule card, drop in mail,
then forget about next semester's books until
you pick them up during the orientation pe-
riod. If later, you find you will be unable to
attend school the second semester, please can-
cel this reservation prQmptly.

II

WE GUARANTEE,

- We wilk select

SIZES
7-15
Petite and
Regular
10-20
121/2 to 242

GOOD USED or NEW required
books, as you sack 'e, and
have ready for you to pick. up at your
convenience.

..6

At rigi is a Bowed
Full skirted Beauty
of cottorn shagbark-
b Betty Hartford
Wonder at 14.95

Store -Wide
ELEARANE

ON FOREST
Off corner of South U.
Opposite Campus Theatre

-GUARANTEED -
THE RIGHT, BOOK
FOR THE RIGHT COURSE!

of al

I

Winter

Apparel

Sale

I

GROUP

Foras s-$10.00
Skirts -$5.00

DRESSMAKER CASHMERES

-- . .- . . .... - - .. ......- ..... ... ... . . ... ....
BOOK RESERVATION CARD
February 1958 Semester
FILL IN THIS CARD and reserve your books for
Dept Course 2nd semester. We GUARANTEE to have the
No. right books ready for you, as you indicate.
I
Name
I Home
IAddress City-
II prefers[ GOOD USED [ NEW BOOKS
'I wil be a © cash, or '[ charge customer.
I _ _Your order will be ready by February 1, 1958.
Signed
Local Address City
(If Available)
Mail YOUR Reservation Card

+ 1:

I.

11

,by

I.

Dresses 20 to 40% off
Cashmere Sweaters

HADLEY and CONNAUGHT

p

20%d

less

by a Famous maker

25% off

II

AT ONCE!

Were $21.95 to $29.95

-k

N

to

BALANCE OF ALL WINTER
MERCHANDISE REDUCED

Pink, Blond, Turquoise, Powder Blue, Greys, Greens.

I

Fine quality cashmere sweaters taken from our regular stock. Feminine
dressmaker styles by two famous makers that you know and trust. Choose
fromIntarsia styles, bateau with rolled collars and a variety of other
a . ,a .:-. _ A ,, A A

11

a

I

, , - - - - m -

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan