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December 15, 1957 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

TI[E 'IICHIGA I\T DAILY

SUNDAY, DECEM1BER 15, I

'Merry Christmas' Wished,
In Many Foreign.Tongues

Students who enjoy giving holi-
day greetings in many different
languages will enjoy adding some
of the following to their vocabu-
laries.
To refresh your memories for
the cqming Yuletide season, we'll
start with some of the more f.a-
miliar ways of saying "Merry
Christmas." In French it's "Joyeux
Noel," in Spanish "Felices Pas-
cuas," in Italian "Buon Natale"
and in German it's "Froliche Weih-
nachten."
. More unusual greetings can be
given by using the Greek "Kala
Xristouyenna" or the Russian "S
Rozhdestvom Khristovym"
Scandinavian countries offer
"God Jul" for Sweden, "Hauskaa
Jaulua" for Finland and it's "Gle-
delig Jul" in both Denmark and
Norway.
In Yugoslavia try "Hristos se

rodi! Vo istinu se rodi," and in
Albania try "Gezuar Krishtlind."
Bulgaria uses the term "Ghestito
Rogdestvo Christovo" while Ro-
mania prefers "Va Uram Sarbatori
Sericite." Hungarians will greet
friends with "Boldog Karacsonyi
Unnepeket."
Czechoslovakians use the simple
"Vesele Vanoce" and the Belgians
use "Falig Kerstfeest!"
People from the Netherlands will
wish you "Een Prettige Kerstmis,"
and the Swiss say "Schoeni Wie-
nacht."
For a real surprise try the Ethio-
pian "Melkamn Ledetna Yedesta
Amet Yihounlachouk" or the Mal-
tese "Il-Milied I-Tajjeb."
The Hawaiian "Mele Kalikimaka
Hauoli Makahiki Hou" will nicely
round out the vocabulary as it
also includes Happy New Year.

WESTERN EUROPE ECONOMICS:
Nations Take Steps Towards Unity
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Gaol Relief
Origmal Aim
Of 'Messiah'
Now given at Christmas time for
enjoyment, George Fredrich Han-
del's "Messiah" was first given at
Easter for the "relief of the pris-
onersiL the several Gaols aqd for
the support of Mercer's Hospital."
Billed as "Mr. Handel's new
Grand Oratorio, called the Mes-
siah," it was first given in the
"Music Hall in Fishamble street,"
according to one of the first adver-.
tisements that appeared for then
Messiah.
On the morning of the first per-
formanceuday, the advertisements
in the Dublin Newspapers request
that ladies attend without hoops
and "Gentlemen are desired to
come without their swords."
By using the space that hoops
and swords might have occupied
the managers of the theatre hoped
(and were able to) increase the
number of people that were able
to attend from 600 to 700.
But, according to old custom, a
public rehearsal was given and in
reality this was the first public
performance of the Messiah.
A review of the rehearsal in one
of the papers said "the Messiah'
was performed so well, that it gave
Euniversai satisfaction to all pres-
ent: and was allowed by the great-
est judges to be the finest compo-
sition of music that ever was heard,
and the sacred words were prop-
erly adapted for the occasion."
At one of the performances, it
was recorded that a member of
the audience shouted out to the
soprano who had sung "He has
despised"-"Woman, for this thy
sins be forgiven thee."
And how did the prisoners bene-
fit from all this? The society for.
"the relief of the Prisoners" was
able to free 142 prisoners.

i

A GIFT FROM SAFFELL & BUSHT
IS DOUBLY APPRECIATED.
ASK THE MAN WHO GETS ONE !*
SA7
f +! :: ' h
.
We wish to tak'e this opportunity of thank-
ing you for this past quarter century of
business you have given us. This has made
possible our ability to stay in the fore-
ground as one of the outstanding Univer-
sity Style & Quality Shops in the United
States.
Men's Gifts for Seleetive Men
a ~
STATE STREET ANN ARBOR
See our floor display every niye.

X
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1

By TOM HENSHAW

Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
After centuries of disunity and
hostility, Western Europe currently
is trending toward cooperation, at
least dn the economic front.
At least 18 European nations-
and three in the Middle East-are
thinking along lines of eliminating
tariff barriers and thus boosting
production, trade and the standard
of living of their people.
Three plans for economic union
are in the discussion stage and a
fourth-the long-sought European
Common Market-is scheduled to
go into effect next Jan. 1.
Six Included
The European Common Market
will include six nations: West
Germany, France, Italy, Belgium,
the Netherlands and Luxembourg.
The latter three have been eco-
nomically joined for several years
as "Benelux"
The others:
1) The Scandinavian Invest-
ment, a customs union of Den-
mark, Norway, Sweden and Fin-
land under which some 80 per
cent of trade between the four
countries would be duty free.
The Scandinavian plan also in-
cludes an "investment bank" pro-
gram with a minimum capitaliza-
tion of 300 million dollars, sub-
scribed on the basis of national
Color TV Cost
To Stay High
There is little prospect for a
substantial reduction in the cost
of color television sets, Frederick
M. Remley, '51, technical director
of the University's television serv-
ice recently said.
"Mass production may lower the
price a little. But within the fore-
seeable future, color television will
remain considerably more expen-
sive than black and white," he
continued.
Remleydexplained that the main
reason for the high price was the
cost of the picture tubes. Color
television tubes are four or five
times more expensive than tubes
for black and white sets of the
same size.
Another reason, according to
Remley, for the high price is that
it requires 10 more ordinary tubes
than a black and white set. These
"ordinary" tubes are similar to
radio tubes, each costing about
four dollars.
The color television tube is com-
posed of three separate tubes in-
side a glass casing. Each of the
individual tubes, or "envelopes"
as they are called, is a different
color.

income, to borrow foreign capital
for resource development.
2) The Baghdad Pact Customs
Union, which would gradually
scale down tariff barriers and thus
increase trade among Turkey, Iraq,
Iran and Pakistan.
3) The catch-all European Free
Trade Area, a sort of auxiliary to
the European Common Market in
which 17 nations would gradually
remove barriers on industrial pro-
ducts.
Markets Added
The free trade area would in-
clude the six common market
countries plus Norway, Denmark,
Sweden, Turkey, Austria, Greece,
Iceland, Ireland, Portugal, Switz-
erland and Great Britain.
The economic experiences of the
great powers, the United States
and the Soviet Union, undoubtedly
are responsible for this new unity
trend in Europe.
The European Coal and Steel
Community, made up of the six
common market nations, has add-
ed further fuel to the free trade
fire since its organization five years
ago.
In that time, trade volume in
tariff-free steel products has in-
creased 93 per cent while trade
volume in goods still subject to
national boundaries went up only
59 per cent.
AreaCompared
The 17-nation European free
trade area would compare favor-
ably with the United States and
the Soviet Union in production,
trade and market, perhaps even
becoming a third great power on
the economic front.
Its consumer population, trade

value and coal production would
top 'both the U.S. and the USSR
production of steel and electricity
would rival that of the United
States.
The European idealists of today
-who may be the realists of to-
morrow-look upon these groping
steps toward economic unity as
only a preamble to still greater
things to come:
A political United States of
Europe, with centuries-old politi-
cal, religious and economic hostili-
ties forgotten for the common good
of all.

C

#I

READI1
COUNT SLOWLY THE NUMBER OF
"F's" IN THE LINES BELOW
Fine Fountain Pens are the result
of years of scientific research
combined with the experience of years.
Turn to page 4 for your answer
BUY YOUR CHRISTMAS CARDS AND GIFTS FROM
MORRI LL'S
314 S. State St.

x

. f

r

OPEN EVENINGS UNTIL 8:30
SINCE,14
for Esquire
Christmas gifts
From the fine imported linen
handkerchiefs to the

come. join our
pillow parade
decorator U iows
rKf00 fos h
ome ik pilows-neverieshaZpe
s lend splashing color that maiws a room
a decorator item-priced low enough
to make you want them cull!

1, ;

.
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