100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 13, 1957 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-12-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0 4t l4icl$ gu Dait
Sixty-Eighth Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG. * ANN ARBOR, MICH. *Phone NO 2-3241

s Are Free
Prevail"

printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.

iMBER 13, 1957

NIGHT EDITOR: DIANE FRASER

Upperclassmen Dorms,
Deserve Consideration

Washington's Space Project
of~
mo h .
M w f C L. .rarT cam. 1.
L, Z
Jr . .f. t , i s 2 ' 4 a- , ." R
4 . . e J4", i .; J. .
~s
'~ ~ - r

EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
January 17 tp January 28, 1958
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "time
of cla',s' Ils the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "time of class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.

First Semester

I'

.1

SEMESTER draws to a close, many,
in University Residence Halls are
sidering ways and means of break-
contracts with the University and
ut of the dorms. Those who don't
continue griping about the quads -
too bitter to be attributed to students
ie time of day.
ange so many men should be dissat-
a dormitory system considered to be
e finest in the country. Though it is,
haysical facilities of the residence hall
among the finest in the country, the
short of providing a home for stu-
this is their avowed purpose.
the goal of a residence hall is the
hat of a fraternity house - to pro-
nelike atmosphere for sleeping, eat-
ing and relaxing. In short, the resi-
should be a home. The quadrangles,
r, are not of themselves conducive tu,
of atmosphere: they must be made
by the residents themselves.
st important single requirement of a
is that it must be conducive to study.
ave desk space, proper lighting and
11, quiet. And it is in the latter spe-
that the quads most often fall short.
HOUIS," that is, periods , in which
aff men are supposed to enforce "rea-
ecorum," is not the answer. What is
what is not quiet is an unknown
be supplied by an individual. What
ufficient quiet for him may be un-
ioise foi another. Indeed, if the staff
leep, who, then, is there to say, "It.
d"? The answer must be determined,
idents themselves. Most upper-class-,
is students above the level of fresh-
aware of the need for quiet while
but all too frequently, students in
year are unaware of this.
tion, the house should be made up
who know one another. If a man
y a few people around him, he might
ell be living in a well-run hotel for
nefit he gets from living in a dorm*
it into a living unit rather than a
of rooms, it should have a measure of
irit "
use should also allow a resident to

express his individuality so long as it does not
infringe on the privileges of those around him.
The regulations governing the residence halls
expect the worst and prepare for it, being in-
flexible and arbitrary, and taking no allow-
ances for the times when residents collectively
may wish to temporarily or permanently relax
them to suit their own needs and desires.
A partial answer. for these problems lies in
the plan of upper-classman dorms - houses
for sophomores, juniors and seniors only. These
dorms would not automatically include all
non-freshmen but be op'en to all who want to
live in t;em.
In this atmosphere, the houses would de-
velop into strong units, free from yearly dilu-
tlon by new students. Turnover among resi-
dents would be rejatively low because these
would be houses that men intended to live in
for the rest of their stay at the University.

REGULAR SCHEDULE

I

Time of Class
at
at
at
at
MONDAY at
at
at
at

..

*
8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Time of Examination
Monday, January 20
Friday, January 24
Friday, January 17
Wednesday, January 22
Monday, January 27
Monday, January 27
Saturday, January 18
Tuesday, January 21,
Tuesday, January 21
Saturday, January 25
Saturday, January 18
Thursday, January 23
Friday, January 24
Saturday, January 25
Thursday, January 23

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12.
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5

I

STUDENTS would gradually drift to the
houses which suited them best and the
houses would gradually develop characteristics
that would appeal to certain groups of stu-
dents - those interested primarily in study,
those looking for more social activity and
those seeking more active athletic programs.
"House spirit" would develop to a much great-
er extent than exists now.
Upper-class dorms can and do work. Martha
Cook, a dorm for junior and senior women, is
very successful in that the house has high
scholastic records and is very active on campus.
There are very real disadvantages to upper-
class dorms. The subsequent removal of upper-
classmen from the regular dorms is an im-
portant one. With these dorms, regular houses
would have even fewer upper-classmen than
they have now. Freshmeh would not have the
number of upper-class students to talk to and
learn from that they have now. On the other
hand, if there is no such dorm system, the
upperclassman is being deprived of something
himself. One group will benefit at the expense
of the other._
This is a problem which deserves further
.study and examination but, on the surface at
least, it seems that the advantages of upper-
class dorms outweigh the objections-,
'-PHILIP MUNCK

:
f:; ;
r f:

TUESDAY

at
at
at
at
at
at
at

+i W..

(Herblock Is

on Vacanon)

CopyrIght. 1957. The Pulitzer Publishing CO.
St. Louis Post-Dispatch

' Classes beginning on the
preceding hour.

half hour will be scheduled at the

WASHINGTON MERRY-GO-ROUND:
Pentagon Appoints Censor
By DREW PEARSON

SPECIAL PERIODS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND TAE ARTS

I

LOOKING UP:
Petition Raises Questions
By JAMES ELSMAN JR.

'HE NEXT FEW DAYS students and fac-
ty will have to be deciding whether or not
gn the Congregation-Dis!iples Guild peti-
which asks Vice-President in Charge of
ent Affairs James A. Lewis to initiate and
bis full support "to an investigation of dis-
mnatr practices in the placement of stu-
; in U versity housing, with a view to the
ediate elimination of such practices."
think the petition merits signing, but
with major reservations, criticisms and.
reements toward both the content and
cations of the petition.
st, though the group says informally that
nts only an investigation of the facts of
ersity housing policy, they make poorly
)rted and undefined assumptions as to
ature of these facts, and further, they are
dy prepared to make recommendations as,
iat action should be taken. In short, after
:ing with leaders of the group we are not
essed with the amount of research' the
did before making its assumptions. The,
i can hardly be competently informed since
1 not consult with the University adminis-
rs who run the dorms or take testimony
students.
the December 8, 1957, issue of The Daily,
uild states that non-discriminat'ory room-
placement (no definition provided) has
n successful "in the many colleges and
rsities across the nation where it is be-
iracticed." Guild members, however, are
ualified to answer these questions with
horoughness: Where is it being practiced?
successful has it been? What is the exact
e of the policy?
TO THE CONTENT of ithe petition itself,.
e Guild says, in effect, that the University
ders students unequal and therefore ex-
s selectivity in assigning roommates. It
, however, that the University's policy of
ly/not rooming a Christian with a Jew (or
combinations) in the freshman year
s no implication of the inequality of e-
one, but is merely a policy which the
rsity thinks sound to insure the happi-
of those concerned in more cases than
any other policy. How well 'this policy
in practice. and how much other policies
been tried are questions which only the
rsity administrators can answer authori-
it San * *aIl

tatively. Are race, religion and nationality
relevant factors in the compatibility of room-
mates? If they are, should they be considered
by the University as they are now?
When the Guild recommends "rooms and
roommates be assigned to all students who
have not designated a specific roommate with-
out regard to race, religion, or national ori-
gin," they advocate instead a policy like that
at the University of California where students
are roomed according to the chronological or-
der their application. This policy would not
allow for the applicant to ask for a "general
category' of roommate, indeed a rigid provi-
sion. Under such an indiscriminate policy, what
happens if a southern white is roomed with a
Negro? There is no reason to assume a con-
flict, the Guild answers, but if one occurs they
say> let the parties separate. What are the
risks of a conflict? One University administra-
tor reports that four Negro women were
roomed with whites this year, and that only
two of the integrations worked out,, the other
two causing major -difficulties and eventual
separatios.
TF THE UNIVERSITY ever undertook an in-
discriminate rooming policy, the results would
be contrary to the desires of most students,
it seems. One must' remember that the response
to the integration question on the men's room
applications is overwhelmingly negative, as a
talk with house mothers reveals. Some indi-
viduals object to the wording of the question
("Are you interested in a roommate of a na-
tionality or race other than your own?")-
there is an implication that most people are
not interested-but whatever the phrasing of
the question, or even without the question, we
believe most freshmen (and their parents) doN
not want to add this social adjustment prob-
lem to the others he anticipates. Should fa-
cilitating the ease of freshman adjustment be
a consideration in determining University
policy, and would the selecting of compatible
roommates-using race and religion as fac-
tors-facilitate adjustment? These are- ques-
tions that need researching. And, isn't some-
what of a cosmopolitan environment provided
since usually Christian, Jew, Negro, etc. "rooms"
are mixed indiscriminately on the corridors,
allowing a free intermingling in bathrooms,
dining rooms and general socializing? If,
through these associations, bi-racial or reli-
gious friendships arise there is every opportun-
ity for the friends to room together in the fu-
ture. Is there evidence, as some say, that the
University has refused to allow integration
when the parties to it expressed a desire? If

WASHINGTON-:-Senators prob-
ing our "Smugniks in Sput-
niks" may not know it, but a secret
censor has been appointed in the
Pentagon to review, and if neces-
sary suppress, information to be
sent to the missile investigating
committee. He is Robert Dechert,
counsel for the Defense Depart-
ment, whose job it is to see that
the senators get no information too
embarassing to the Administration.
Despite this, the senators have
laid hands on one dynamite-laden
document, labeled RM-1760, dated
June 21, 1956, which as far back
as a year-and-a-half ago gave
grim warning of Russia's might.
The secret report was based on'
Soviet technical journals, which
have proved amazingly frank -
'when the Administration' could
spare the money to translate them.
* * *
QUOTING THESE technical
journals, the secret .RM-1760 re-
port revealed 18 months ago that
Russia was combining military
missiles into one powerful "launch
vehicle" capable of hurling a one-
ton satellite aloft. Later, it devel-
oped that the Russian satellite
weighed only half a ton, -which was
about 1,000 pounds heavier than
our "kaputnik."
The secret report also revealed
that Russia was building a mam-
mloth moon rocket to be powered
by 20 rocket motors.
Despite this, the Eisenhower Ad-
ministration flatly ignored the
warning, secretly slashed research
funds and even slowed down qur
missile production schedule. The
budget-first boys, led by "Assistant
President" Sherman Adams and
then Secretary of the Treasury
George Humphrey, persuaded Ike
it was more important to give the
voters a tax cut.'
They slapped a ceiling on de-
fense spending that almost threw

the missile program into a tail-
spin. Not until the Soviet Sputniks
awakened the public to what the
Administration knew 18 months
before were the research cutbacks
restored and-the missile program
speeded up.
Here's what RM-1760, a techni-
cal intellligence -report prepared
for the Air Force by the Rand
Corporation, revealed two sum-
mers ago:
1) That Russia had already
started construction of a moon
rocket about .200 feet long and 40
feet in diameter. It would be driven
to the moon by 20 rocket motors,
capable of generating 350,000,000
horsepower. At take-off, 75 per
cent of its gross weight would be
fuel.-
2) That the Soviets were build-
ing a four-stage satellite launcher
that could catapault a one-ton
payload into an orbit 125 to 1,000
miles above the Earth. Significant-
ly, this was described, as a "pro-
duct of the T-3 (Intercontinental
Ballistic Missile) program."
3) That the Russians were
completing 'a 160-foot ICBM,
weighing ,250 tons, with a range
of 5,000 miles. This is the terrible
T-.3 whose first stages, the 'eport
said, are T-1 and T-2 intermediate
missiles.
4) ' That Russia "started pro-
duction" in 1956 of the T-2, an
85-ton ballistic missile with an
1,800-mile range. Its lox-kerosene
motor- produced 245,000 pounds
thrust, almost twice what our best
engine, can do now.
5) That the Russians were also
producing the T-4, a "supersonic
glide missile," which could sail
1,000 miles on thin wings.
6) That they were developing
a manned rocket bomber able to
soar over 100 miles into space for
distances up to 10,000 miles. Al
ready flight-tested, this is the

nearest man has come to building
a manned space ship.
7) That 18 months ago, the
Soviets had already produced a
rocket fuel that could get 40 per
cent more thrust out of an engine
without increasing its size or
weight.
81 That they are producing at
least two manned rocket planes,
the YAK-21 and LA-17, compar-
able to our X-1 and X-2 experi-
mental planes.
9) That Russia already had
manned rocket interceptors, cap-
able of shooting down jet bombers,
stationed around her arms cen-
ters.
10) That the Soviet arsenal is
bristling with lesser rockets and
missiles, including several that
can be launched from submarines
under water for, distances up tb
750 miles.
* * *
THE SHOCKING RM-1760 re-
port dismissed the suggestion that
Russia was relying on imported
German scientists and stolen sec-
rets for her rocket development.
"Quick to realize the enormous
military potential of the rocket,"
the report declares, "The Soviet
government organized a govern-
ment-sponsored rocket research
program in 1934, eight years be-
fore systematic Army-sponsored
research began in the United
States."
What the Senators would like
to know is why RM-1760 went un-
heeded and why the truth about
Soviet missile power has been
withheld from the public.
Note: Central Intelligence Chief
Allen Dulles warned senators be-
hind closed doors that Russia is
ahead of us in every military field
except atomic submarines. He
claimed the Soviets are a "couple'
of years" ahead in satellites and
intercontinental missiles.
(Copyright 1957 by Bell Syndicate Inc.)

Botany 2
Chemistry 3, 5E, 15, 182
Economics 71, 72
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 153
English 23, 24
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 21, 31, 32
Geology 11
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 35
Physics 53
Psychology 190
Russian 1, 31
Sociology 1, 4, 60
Spanish 1, 2, 21, 31, 32
Naval Science 101, 201, 301,
301M, 3018, 401, 401M,
401 S

Monday, January 20
Monday, January 2'
Thursday, January 23
Saturday, January 25
Friday, January 17
Tuesday, January 28
Monday, January 20
Wednesday, January 22
Thursday, January 23
Friday, January 17
Tuesday, January,28
Tuesday, January 28
Wednesday, January 22

Tbursday, January 23 7-10 p.m.

SCIXOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Bus. Ad. 11, 12 Thursday, January 23 2-5

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5

I,

COLEGE
Ch.-Met. 1, Lee B and D
Ch.-Met. 11
C. E 21, 151
C. E. 22
C. E. 133, 141
Drawing 1, 33
Drawing 2, 21
Drawing 11
E. E. 5
E. M.,1
E. M.2
English 11
I. E. 100, 120-
M. E. 2
M. E. 132
Naval Science 101, 201, 301,
301M, 301S, 401, 401M,
4018

OF ENGINEERING
Tuesday, January 28
Tuesday, January 28
Friday, January 17
Wednesday, January 22
Tuesday, January 21
Monday, January 20
Wednesday, January 22
Tuesday, January 28
Monday, January 20
Friday, January 17
Wednesday, January 22
Friday, January 17
Friday, January 17
Thursday, January, 23
Wednesday, January 22

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-S
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

''

I

'1

Thursday, January 23 7-10 p.m.

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND -THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examination periods must be reported for adjustment.
.See bulletin board outside Room 301 W. E. between December 10
and 20 for instructions.
SCHOOL Olt MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board of the School of Music.

CONCERNING SGC:
J-Hop DecisionReaffirmed

By JOHN WEICER
Daily Staff Writer
STUDENT Government Council
spent a full hour Wednesday
reconsidering its action eliminat-
ing elections to J-Hop Central
Committee.
After some parliamentary man-
euvering, the Council approved a
motion by Daily Editor Peter Eck-
stein to reconsider last week's ac-
tion. Eckstein, who had voted to
abolish the election, said reconsid-
eration was necessary for two rea-
sons.
He listed the failure to inform
J-Hop Central Committee and
other ,interested groups of the
proposal last week, and the pos-
sible distinction between schedul-
ing the J-Hop election at a differ-
ent time from the SGC election
and abolishing it altogether, as
previously vented.
VIRTUALLY every SGC mem-
ber had something to say on the
issue. Much of the discussion cen-

However, SGC Treasurer Scott
Chrysler thought running for J-
Hop required more initiative than
petitioning. He said the initiative
displayed in campaigning was a
good criterion of ability and added
that the enthusiasm generated in
an election also served a valuable
publicity purpose for the dance,
though not in a direct way.
J-Hop Central Committee Chair-
man Jim Champion appeared be-
fore the- Council. He urged that
SGC restore the electidh, saying
that it was a campus tradition,
and that the members of the
present J-Hop Committee fav-
ored the election process.*
Miss Segal, however, said that
the Sophomore class, rather than
the present committee, should be
consulted as to whether it fav-
ored the election. SGC finally
voted again, 10 to seven, to elimi-
nate the election entirely.
THE QUESTION of a possible

east corner of Liberty and May-,
nard.
Chrysler suggested that weather
conditions Saturday might ac-
count for the Nickels Arcade vio-
lation. Eckstein replied that any
extenuating circumstances in the
case might be considered by Joint
Judic.
SGC spent quite a little time on
a petition to end residence hall
discrimination, before permitting
circulation by a vote of 10 to four.
The Congregational-Disciples Stu-
dent Guild had asked the Council
for permission to set up a table
on the Diag.
The petition requested that a
policy of integration be established
in the residence halls. To this end,
it asked for the abolition of the
photograph on residence hall ap-
plications.
THERE WAS some confusion
over whether the Council would
be endorsing the petition or mere-
ly granting the Guild permission

COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF PHAR\MACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC

I

I,

Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School bulletin board. t

(Continued from Page 3)

ing; thesis: "Heat and Mass Transfer
in Closed, vertical, Cylindrical vessels
With Internal Heat Sources for Homo-
geneous Nuclear Reactors," Fri., Dec.
13, 3201 East Engineering Building, at
2:30 p.m. Chairman, H. A. Ohigren.

Napoleon, Michigan - Boys' Physical
Education/English.
Vassar, Michigan -- Chemistry/Physi-
los.
Wenatchee, Washington (.District No.
146)-Special Education (Speech Ther-
apist).,
For any additional information, con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Administration Building, NO 3-1511,

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan