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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 11, 1957 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-12-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

es from Politics To Marriage
.yi"y .": e r .xr~i;acov,.,.., ...:. .;tsr .[ec. s ...s. r... . r

y lay claim
have been in
than any

tudent
i cam-
Janet
officer.
SGC
Hart-
-, and,
.SGC

s come a full
anounced her
Editor Peter

i

leal further
es involved.
Legislature
id has been
tion.

-Daily-Fred Shippey
STUDENT LEGISLATOR-Janet Neary, '58, has more time to
devote to the academic side of life now that she is no longer
executive vice-president of SGC. As she is left-handed, she is able
to work and look at the ring given her by Peter Eckstein, '58,
Daily Managing Editor and her fiance as well.

.y f

:ple muchl
al warmer.

IERE
vAANCE

Jan's involvement in activities
has taken several guises. Not only
was she vice-president of SGC, but
she was regional chairman of the
National Student Association,s
which gave her a seat on NSA's
executive committee. She holds a
position on the Board of-Directors
of the University Development
Council, and a chairmanship of
the Student Relations Committee
of that organization.
The development Council is--re-f
sponsible for raising money for the
University through sources other
than the StateiLegislature.
Miss Neary, who is also a mem-
ber of Pi Beta Phi sorority, is con-
sidered in some circles to be rather
excessively liberal.

I,

N

"WOW' I ,

, Sigma Kappa Issue
How did she acquire that repu-
tation? Probably, in most recent
times by "voting for deferred sor-
ority rushing and voting to find
Sigma Kappa.sorority in violation
of University regulations." The
group was charged with violating a
regulation concerning discrimina-
tion in -membership on racial;
grounds:
However, Miss Neary staunchly
maintains that sometimes she's a
reactionary, sometimes a conserva-
tive, and- perhaps sometimes a
liberal (using a strict Political
Science definition).
"For instance," she said, "there
are some -things from the SL I'd
like to recapture." She"liked the
"intense concern" with campus
problems manifested by that group
and the 'great feeling of respon-
sibility to represent student opin-
ion as opposed to Administrative
opinion."
More recently, she says, she's
been a conservative.
Opposes Honor System
For instance, she was opposed to
the honor system because she could
not see any real advantage in a
change.
Andgshe's been a liberal? Well,
on the deferred rushing and Sigma
Kappa issues. 'Especially so, she
said, if one definesa liberal as a
person who puts a principle ahead,
"of any vested interest group."
Miss Neary feels she has gotten
a great deal from lier student ac-
tivities She cited the people she
has had he opportunity to know,
the general administrative skills,
and the feeling thiatstudent gov-
ernment has made a real contri-
bution to the University.
As for the NSA., "some of the
most outstanding people I have
ever met and ever will meet have
been in that organization."
Valuable Experience
NSA, she said, has combined
practical leadership training with
the underlying philosophy of a
student movement and has been a
most valuable experience.
Miss Neary still has a great deal

to keep her busy, outside of her
school work (she has maintained
a 3.25 average). 1
She serves on the Development
.Council and is activities chairman,
of her house.
Wedding Plans
She does feel freei now to choose
what to do with her time. But,
then there are plans for the wed-
ding which will take place in Ann
Arbor sometime in June.
"If you feel lost," after leaving
SGC, she said "then SGC has not
given you anything."
Carillon Concert
Scheduled Today
Prof. Percival Price, University
Carillonneur, will present a Christ-
mas carillon concert from 6:30 to
7 p.m. today and Friday.
The programs will consist of
Christmas carols and a few re-
quests. Carillon concerts will also
be given on Monday,'Wednesday
and Friday of next week.
Organization I
Notices
(Use of this column for announce-
ments of meetings is available to of-
ficially recmgnizeingandregistered stu-
dent organizations only.)
ASCE, Dec. 11, '7:30 p.m., Rm. 311 WE.
Speaker: Yr. Howard E. Hill, Deputy-
commissioner-Engineering, Mich. State
Highway Dept. Ensian picture will be
taken.
Alpha Phi Omega,+ Exec. Committee
meeting, Dec.m11, 7:1Epm., 2528 SAS.
Chess Club, meeting, Dec. 11, 7:30
p.m., Union.
Physics Club, meeting, Dec. 11, 7:45
'p.m., 2038 Randall Lab. Speaker: Dr.
Thomas, Wayne University, "Solid State
Physics."
All graduate students are cordially
invited to Grad. Coffee Hour, Dec. 11.
4-5:30 p.m., W. Lounge, Rackham.
* * *
ULLR Ski Club, meeting, Dec. 11, 7:30
p.m., Rm. 3-B, Union. Plans, for vaca-
tion trip..
Michigan Forensic ;Forum, meeting,
Dec. 12, 7:30 p.m., Rm 3-K Union. '.op-
ic: "How Will 'Sputnl ' 1L).lueznce the
Future of Liberal Arts Education?"
Guests: Prof. Angell, Sociology Dept.
and Chm. of honors program; Dr. Grace
Poll. Si. Dept.Aand (tentatively) Dr.
Eisenberg, Fine Arts Dept.
- * * *
Mechanical Engineering Club, meet-
ing, Dec. 11, 7:30 p.m., 3003 SAB. Speak-
er: Mr. Harry A. Bolenski, "Foreign
Cars."
ars. * * *
Mass meeting for all grads and under-
grads interested in participating in the
proposed SGC Southeast Asia Student
Delegation during the summer of 1958,
Dec. 11, 7:00 p.m., Rm. 3-S Union.
* * *
January Graduation Announcements
available Dec. 1 12, 13, 1-5:00 p.m.,
SAS.

Collins Says'
Ghana Like
British Isles
(Continued from Page 1)
ment formerly In the hands of
the tribal chiefs."
Elaborating on the second prob-
lem, Collins said the chiefs are
still a powerful force in Ghana,
and many people look to them for
leadership instead of to the gov-
ernment. He remarked the latter
must be very circumspect in its
relations with the local authori-
ties.
"These local chiefs aren't primi-
tive head-hunters; they are in-
telligent and moral leaders, keenly
aware of their responsibilities in
upholding local tradition."
Position Encroached
Collins expressed the opinion
that the position of the chiefs is
rapidly being encroached upon by
the modern elements in Ghanean
politics. The rural areas, he stated,
are for the most part out of touch
with national and world affairs.
Since its inception, the govern-
ment has done much to improve
living conditions; particularly in
the areas of medical and sanitary
conditions.
Collins was enthusiastic about
the new hospitals, recently con-
structed by the government from
export proceeds..
"They are the newest of their
kind in Africa and comarable to
many in the United States."
Teams Visit ;
He also praised the traveling
health teams which visit the re-
mote villages. "They have done a
miraculous job in relieving some
of the squalor and rampant dis-
ease of the local communities."
"Perhaps the most startling and
novel feature of the new govern-
ment is the complete suffrage of
male and female." According to
Collins, most Ghaneans still blink
in amazement at this feature.
However/ they are serious about
their pew responsibilities, recall-
ingtthe long years of British dom-
ination.
Nkrumah Educated
"It is interesting to note that
the Prime Minister, Dr. Nkrumah,
was educated at Lincoln University
in the United States," he contin-
ued, emphasizing the natural po-
litical affinity of the new repub-
lic to tle West.
In spite of the existence of a.
host of peculiar political problems
facing the young nation, Collins
was enthusiastic about its future.
"What is important is the energy
and public spirit of the leaders
and their willingness to experi-
ment outside of the traditional
pattern."
He considered most important
the fact that Ghana needs the
support of the United States. Not.
only financial support is needed,
but an earnest attempt to under-
stand its problems, internal and
external.
Tonight t8 :30
THE MICHIGAN UNION
presents
THE MUSKET SHOW
COLE PORTER'S

E "

Wit ovr 1,00,00 n tudntopportunities on and of 'campus
With over $1,000,000 in student than students willing to work."
loan funds, one of the largest fundsthnsueswilgtoor.
in the country, the University is Significant decreases in student
expected to =exceed this amount employment is refiected in the Oc-
in granting loans by the spring tober report ot the Personnel Of-
sAt the present time fice. Part-time jobs on campus de-
$180,000 is available for loans. Rea clined from 372 in 1956 to 272 this
predicted that $240,000 will be year, while off-campus placements
demanded by students in February, dropped from 137 to 75, averaging
a one-third drop overall.
Planning to fund the anticipated Explaining the tightness of stu-
surge of loans In February, Univer- dent finances J. Robert Stewart of
sity officials are exploring new Michigan State stated, "If any one
sources to support the funds. "Un- factor can be considered respon-
restricted loan funds are the most sible, it is probably the overall eco-
needed type," Rea asserted. nomic situation which makes
To meet the students' growing scholarships, loans, and jobs scarce
financial needs, two regulations of and expenses increasingly high,
the loan funds were revised by the thereby increasing demand for.
Regents recently. The first permits financial aids."
an increase in the size of the loan Virginia Dreyer of Wayne State
to any one student and the second declares that the exploding de-
allows an extension of the period mand for loans and scholarships is
of time to be covered by a loan. caused by "wider interest in higher
, Except for Purdue and Washing- education due to increasing pub-
ton all colleges participating in licity, the prestige factor, and hope.
the Univedsity's survey indicated 'of higher salaries and greater
loan funds were being used exten- security."

I

IV

(Continued from Page 1)
which do not relate directly to
business and industry, are particu-
larly short," J. Robert Stewart,
director of scholarships, said.
Fields of medicine, law, and
liberal arts are cited by Virginia
Dreyer, Wayne State Qounselor for
student financial aids, as being
short of scholarship. Engineering
and pharmacy are relatively fav-
ored she said.

POW

High Costs, Few Jobs Cause
Drainage of 'U' Loan Funds

Delightful, Refreshing Entertao

Dial
NO 2-3136

inment!

sively. Purdue's $5,000 emergency
loan fund was depleted and refilled
over eight times last year.
Jobs on college campuses are de-
clining according to the reports
from the University, Michigan
State, Indiana, State University of
Iowa, and Iowa State. Purdue,
Wayne State, Colorado and Dart-
mouth relate no substantial
change, while the University of
Washington says it has "more job

L

TecoliCOLOR.

RILLEL FOUNDATION
Presents;Its Dance
Sat., Dee..14 912:30 PJ
MUSIC REFRESHMENTS
M'emb rs $1.00 Non-Members $1.50
1429 HILL STREET

WALT DISNEY"'S
aZTtue feiFatasy

4
ss :

:1 .
{

and THlE FLQQD TRATY!DESTROYED THE WORLD!

,

Added-Disney's "ALASKANSLED DOG]
Soon "Tommy And The Bachelor"

Daily Classifieds
BringQu ick..Results

F,

HA~E THE FLICKS CONTEST
INSTRUCTIONS: All you have to do is use your intelligence and guess the, thirty-one films from the 140 below
that you-think Cinema Gu ild Board will choose- from its selection for next year's showipg. Check the 31 you choose.
Winner receives a free year's pass for two to Cinema Guild. Second prize receives a semester's pass for two. In case
of ties, earliest postmark wins. Contest closes Sunday, January 12, 1958. Send in to Cinema Guild Contest, Student
Activities Building, Ann Arbor, Michigan. Only University students eligible with the exception of all present Cine-
ma Guild members and their relatives.

Week Nights DIAL
at 7 and 9 NO 8-6416
\I
The Aadeuy-Award Winning Creators @o
"GATE OF HELL"
ENDS "RASHOMON"
ENDS have jiied to bring you the first
fresh, vital story of Japan today!
in Unsurpassed Eastman Color
. Premieres THURSDAY .
SSome of the Most Stirring Episodes in
The Annals of Screen Spectacles."-N.Y. Her. Trib.

I

/

presents

Tickets available at
Box Office and Michigan Union

I

Li
0i
ai
Li
Li

The Baker's Wife
Manon
Le Plaisir
Rules of the Game
Topaze r
Open City
This Strange Parr ^n
Ballet Concert
Boris Godunov
Orpheus

0i
0i
0i
ai

riss
lile
(ate

SATURDAY
OF THE
GRAF SPE E

I

I

I

Elizabeth the Queen-
Five Fingers
The Green Pastures
In Old Chicago
Johnny Belinda
Laura
The Life of Emile Zola
The Male Animal
Midsummer Night's
Dream
The Ox-Bow Incident
The Rains Came
A Royal Scandal
Sitting Pretty
So Big
The Story of Louis'
Pasteur
Tobacco Road
We're Not Married

a

Q Lucrezia Borgia
Q The Devil and Daniel
Webster
You Can't Take It
With You
Q The Wild One

LI
w
Li
LI
LI
Li

Q.
aLI
'El
0i
Li
=Ii
ai

Torment
Alexander Nevsky
Chapayev
Film Without A Name
All the King's Men
Lost Horizon

Ramuntcho
Ruy Bias
The Marriage,
Shoeshine

of Figaro

L Brighqm Young
[ Captain Blood
Li The Day the Earth
Stood Still
L Dangerous Crossing
L Drums Along the
Mohawk
L The Farmer TakesR
Wife

a

rLi
0i
7I

Champion
The Long Voyage Home
Nothing Sacred
Stagecoach
Cry the Beloved Country
Outcast of the Islands
Tales of Hoffman

Up in Central
The Titfield
All About Eve

Park

L Gentlemen Prefer
glandes
Q How Green Was My
Valley
I I AWas A Male War
Bride

I'

Christmas Suggestions from orrill's

BRIDGE SUPPLIES
Duplicate Bridge Boards

. 1, 12, 13
t Tickets

Kem Cards
Congress Playing
Bridge Tallies
Bridge Scores
CRIBBAGE BOARDS
CHECKER BOARDS
GAMES
Portable Typewriters

Cards

Crane & Eaton's. Stationery
Christmas Cards - Box & Rack
Christmas Gift Wrappings
Cartridge filled pens
Esterbrook, Sheaffer,
Waterman
Desk Pen Sets
Fountain Pen & Pencil Sets
Desk Calendars
Desk Sets.

Li
Li
LQ
ai
Li
.o
Li
Li

Moonrise
Spectre of the Rose
Walk in the Sun
Scotch on-the Rocks
Rembrandt
The Male Brute
Carmen
Ugetsu
Incorrigible
Golden Boy
The Moon and Sixpence
My Sister Eileen
All My Sons
Brief .,Encounter
Destry Rides Again
Imitation of Life
... t.. -

Li
0i

Li Wilson
L The Cat People
The Little Minister,
L Tillie's Punctured
Romance
David Copperfield
L Little Women
L San Francisco
L The Thin Man
L Viva Villa
L Maedchen in Uniform
L The Cabinet of Doctor
Caligari
l Devil in the Flesh

The Golem
Tomorrow is Too Late
Adventures of Robinson
Crusoe
A Song to Remember
Last of the Mohicans
Way Out West.
The Bank ,'Dick
The Benny Goodman
Story
The Browning Version
The Glenn Miller Story
The Importance of
Being Earnest
Odd Man Outt

Li
Li
Li
Li
Li
Li
Li
Li
Li
LI
Li
LI
Li
0
f
rEl

Juarez
Les Miserables
Lifeboat
The Maltese Falcon
Mr. 880
The Old Maid
Pinky
The Razor's Edge
Savage Splendor
The Snows , of
Kilirmanjaro
State Fair
Strangers on a Train
Treasure of the Sierra
Madre
Where's Charlie?

Li
Li
LI
Li

VJOW

rr

II!

Cmi+h_

_Cnrnr rr FIrSr+rir grrnn f'r Phntn Rnnlcfi

I

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