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December 08, 1957 - Image 14

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-12-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DECEMBERS, 1957

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1~37

oil

Man Long Dreams of Traveling to Moon

Hatchers Invite Students
To Christmas Open House

By ELIZABETH ERSKINE
"Christmas is just a family get-
t o g e t h e r," says Mrs. Harlan
Hatcher, wife of the University
president.
"We don't do anything special.
We just have the regular Ameri-
can Christmas, with relatives and
the rest," she continues.
The Hatcher children., Anne
Linda, 13 years old and Robert, 11
years old, still hang their stockings
"in the good old American tradi-
tion." "It's something nice to hang
onto," commented Mrs. Hatcher.
Like Presents
In the typical children's way
they like presents and stockings,
and especially the suspense and
the visits of relatives that Christ-
mas brings.
Officially, the Hatchers plan
two functions during the holiday
season. The first is a student open
house which will be held from 4
to 6 p.m. Dec. 11.
The unique "open house" tradi-
tion was started early in President
Emeritus Alexander G. Ruthven's
22 years of office, and has con-
tinued as a popular aspect of stu-
dent life.
League Organizes
Five years after they started the
social committee of the League
took over the task of organizing
the open houses. Later the Union
joined with the League to plan
them. Since then men and women
students have served as hostesses
and introduced students and spe-
cial guests to President and Mrs.
Hatcher and their two children.
An outstanding feature of the
open houses is that hostesses act
as guides and take students on
tours of the Hatcher home.

The Hatcher home was built in
1850, on the original 40 acres
which comprised the campus. It
was one of five houses costing
$45,000 - what was then an ex-,
travaga-nt price. The five houses
were known as faculty houses, and
all but one has been torn d6wn to
make way for expanding class-
room needs.
Informal Entertainment
While attending the open house,
students have the opportunity to
chat over a cup of coffee and en-
joy informal e n t e r t a i n m e n t,
which ranges from ukelele players
to pianists and singers.
Although the open house is open
to the entire campus, at each one
a number of housing units or oth-
er groups are invited as special
guests. International students are
also invited to help them get ac-
quainted with American students.
Following tradition set years
ago, house mothers, resident di-
rectors and wives of faculty pour
tea and coffee.
Decorations Appear
Students who attend will notice
Christmas decorations starting to
appear at the home. "Our tree
won't be up yet, but I try to dec-
orate the house partially before
the students leave, to help them
get in the spirit of things," adds
Mrs. Hatcher. "We don't have any
special decorations-just the fam-
ily tree and gold decorations," she
continued.
"The only other official enter-
taining we do," says Mrs. Hatch-
er, "is a party we give the evening
after Christmas for those inter-
national students who are left in
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CENTURIES OF DREAMS-The lunar landscape, decorated in pre-astronomy days with such picturesque place names as the Sea of
Crises, the Marsh of Decay, the Ocean of Storms, the Sea of Clouds, Hell and the Bay of Rainbows, reflects Man's obsession with the
power attributed to the earth's original satellite. Now the advances of science may permit men to set foot on the moon's surface, to
view at last the hither-to unknown other side, within a comparatively few years.

By JOHN BARBOUR
Associated Press Science Reporter water covered. The name was the
latin for sea, mare.
The most temptingtarget in He called these areas by the
space right now is the pimply, H aldteeaesb h
pocked face of the moon, It's close names of earth elements he could
by, well-known and predictable. not control, suggesting that the
These are-k jus a frewd fte slow march of the moon controlled
These are just a few of the sc hnsa hwrcod,
reasons why Man, trying out his schs tigsas showers, clouds,
new-found power to travel in crises, fertility, storms, even tran-
space, probably will be climbing quility.
lunarmotaisandbuil o He called other landmarks the
the moon's dusty surface before the Marsh of Mist, the Lake of
many years have passed.
He's been dreaming of the trip Death, the Bay of Rainbows.
for a long time. A look at the In later years he noted by tele-
scope that these really were plains,
accompanying map and some of not seas and lakes. He also found
the names he's planted on the mountains and he named many of
moon will tell you that. them after the mountains he knew
Early Studies on the earth: the Apennines, the

moon rotates at such a speed that
it always keeps the same face
toward the earth as it travels in
its orbit around the earth.
Consequently Man has seen only
one side of the moon, but he
knows that side very well. One tele-
scope he now has brings the image
of the moon to within 250 miles of
his curious eyes.
In some ways, he knows the
moon better than he knows his
own planet. He plots the moon's
orbit and speed. He depends on
its elliptical travels that average
some 240,000 miles away. As it
turns around the earth, the moon
creates the tides of Man's oceans
and seas.
Force Held
It's ironic that the moon should
have gravitational force capable

of influencing earth's .oceans, but
unable to hold an atmosphere of
its own.
It's strange too that the moon,
which is about a quarter as large
as /the earth, should have moun-
tains more than half as high as
the earth's biggest. Mt. Huygens in
the moon's Apennine range is some
18,000 feet high, while the earth's
highest mountain is 29,000-foot
Mt. Everest.
For centuries the moon has at-
tracted the fancy and superstition
of man. Now, it's on the thresh-
hold of atracting him in body.
Subscribe to
The Michigan Daily

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Before the days of telescopes,
Man dubbed the darker areas on
the moon seas, thinking they wereI

Alps, the Carpathians.
Man has never ceased to study
the lunar surface. He found the

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