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December 07, 1957 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-12-07

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V

POve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, DECEMBER T, 1057

ICGill Defense

Stops
Meet

Icers;
Nebrask

BROWNS LEAD IN EAST:
Colts' Title To Hinge on 49er Game

M'

Five

To

Cagers Seek First Win
In Home Opener Tonight

By DON DRESCHER
This weekend is do or die for
many teams in both divisions of
the NFL title race as the 'regular
season schedule enters the last
two weeks.
Baltimore, currently setting the
pace in the Western Division, will
try to eliminate San Francisco.
The Forty-Niners are tied with
Detroit one game behind the Colts.
A Baltimore win would complete-
ly erase any hopes the Forty-
Niners have of winning the cham-
pionship.
Both teams have been moving
well and both are armed with
good passing quarterbacks and
able runners.
In the meantime the Lions can

expect troubles of their own in the
form of the Eastern Division lead-
er, Cleveland Browns. The Browns
need only one win in their re-
maining two games to clinch the
title in their segment. The Lions
have an even bigger stake in the
game. A loss could put them com-
pletely out of the running if Bal-
timore defeats the Forty-Niners.
A Detroit victory would also be
greatly appreciated by the New
york Giants who meet the Pitts-
burgh Steelers tomorrow after-
noon in a nationally televised
game. The Giants rest in second
place, a game and a half behind
Cleveland.'
In an intra-city tilt the Chicago

Bears face the Cardinals with
each team trying to pick up the
pieces of a mediocre season. The
Bears, currently fourth in the
West, could conceivably surge into
second by the season's end.
Los Angeles plays host to the
Green Bay Packers who will try
to raise themselves out of the
Western Division cellar. The West
is fairly tightly packed and there
is still a possibility for consider-
able juggling before the final
standings are in.
In the other contest in Sunday's
action, the Philadelphia Eagles
travel to Washington to oppose
the Redskins.

By AL JONES

Xi

Michigan's basketball team will
open its home season tonight at
8:00 p.m. against the Cornhuskers
of Nebraska at Yost Field House.
Although this is.the second game
of the season for the Wolverines,
Coach Bill Perigo is hoping to start,
things all over again. His cagers
dropped their opener at Pittsburgh,
Wednesday night, when they were
practically run off the court, 72462.
Still pondering that initial de-
feat, Perigo is uncertain about his
starting lineup for tonight. He has
tentatively named the same team
that started against Pitt: Captain
Pete Tillotson and M. C. Burton
at forwards, Randy Tarrier at cen-
ter, and George Lee and Jack
Lewis at guards.
Nebraska Tougher
"Nebraska is a lot tougher than
Pitt," Perigo states. "They have
greater heighth and more return-
ees, according to the scouting re-
ports we have received." The Mich-
igan coach has taken advantage of
the Midwest Scouting Bureau to
get informaton about Nebraska.
Coach Jerry Bush will start Don
Schmidt and Willie Fitzpatrick at
forwards, Bob Mayo at center, and
Lyle Nannan and Captain Gary
Reimers at guards.
Although .Michig an's .starting

team will be slightly taller overall
than Nebraska, the Cornhuskers
are a lot taller than the Pittsburgh
team which completely dominated
the boards against the Wolverines
Wednesday.
'Team Is Tired'
"We looked dead against the
Panthers," Perigo said. "Our team
is tired and isn't looking as sharp
as they did two weeks ago.",
Lee is suffering from a slight
charlie-horse, but is ready to play.
Some of the others have been
bothered by exams the past few
days.
"If we can't outrebound them
with the usual starters, I will ex-
periment," the Wolverine coach
explained. "They are too good a
team to experiment against, but
I may have to juggle the lineup
anyway."
The Panthers use the fast "give
and go" offense, in which they
screen for each other and move
the ball around alot. If Michigan
fails to rebound Perigo will substi-
tute smaller men like Billy Wright
and Terry Miller and try to outrun
them.
Nebraska beat Wyoming Thurs-
day night, and is rated fourth in
the Big Eight, a tough basketball
conference including Kansas and
Wilt Chamberlain among others.

Come

to Church

Sunday

r.

-Daily-Wesley Kar
BRIGHT SPOT - Bobbie Watts (2) Michigan.
sophoanor defenseman, one of the crew of
Wolverine rear guard, who along with goalie Ross
Childs drew the praise of Coach Al Renfrew
for their strong play in Michigan's 3-2 loss to
McGill last night. The two teams meet again
tonight.

-Daily-Wesley Kar
LITTLE SPEEDSTER - Guard Bill Wright,
5'11" may see early action tonight in Michigan's
basketball game with Nebraska. Coach Bill Peri-
go is edntemplating moving Wright into the
game early for added speed and defense if his
starting lineup has trouble with the Cornhiiskers.
Wright scored 17 points against Pitt Wednesday.

A ____________________________________s__________

Switzer, Unsworth Tally
Only wolverine Scores

(Continued from Page 1)
The Wolverines held the upper
hand at the start when McGill's
Leo Konyk was sent off on a two-
minute penalty for an illegal
check with only 57 seconds gone.
Michigan's power play with
Captain Neil McDonald, Ed Swit-
zer, Don McIntosh, Bob White
teamed with defenseman Barry
Hayton couldn't dent the Redmen
defense with their efforts.
McGill finally opened the scor-
ing late in the second period at
16:36 while Michigan's Gary
Mattson was off with a tripping
penalty. sThe tally 'came as six
players including goalie Ross
Childs were piled up at the Wol-
verine net trying to find the loose'
puck.
The visitors' Dick Baltzan found
it behind him, hooked his stick
to his side and slid the'puck into
the net to give the Redmen a 1-0
margin after two-periods.
In the third period Michigan's
plays finally began to click as they
quickly' closed the margin on a
goal by Center Gary Unsworth at
4:15.
Hayton started the goal-getting
play deep in Michigan's zone, by
passing to right wing John Hut-
ton who dashed down the right
Statistics
FIRST PERIOD: No scoring.
Penalties: McGill - Konyk
(illegal check) :57; Michigan-
White (charging) 2:41; McGill
-Konyk (hooking) 6:11; Mc-
Gill - Horsman (boarding)
8:50; Michigan - White (hold-
ing) 12:06.
SECOND PERIOD: Scoring
-McGill - Baltzan (Konyk)
16:36.
Penalties: Michigan - Watt
(interference) 5:49; Michigan
-McIntosh (charging) 10:18;
McGill - McDonald (tripping)
13:24; Michigan - Mattson
(tripping) 15:43; Michigan -
Hayton (holding) 18:15.
THIRD PERIOD: Scoring .-
Michigan - Unsworth (Hutton,
Hayton) 4:15; McGill-Baltzan
(Konyk) 9:27; Michigan-Swit-
zer (White) 10:29; McGill-Sig-
urdson (Unassisted) 15:36.
Penalties: McGill - McGre-
gor (tripping) 10:00; Michigan
Mattson (illegal check) 13:51;
Michigan -- Hudson (unneces-
sary roughness) 14:38; McGill
-Konyk (unnecessary rough-
ness) 14:38..
Saves
Joyal (McGill) 9-8-3-20
Childs (Mich.) 6-10-7-23
RUSHING
inrl irmn'Al TI

ward the center where Unsworth
side and flicked a pass over to-
snapped a shot past Joyal.
McGill once again edged into
the lead as a passing play from
Baltzan to Konyk and back to
Baltzan who skated across the
front -of the net and slid the puck
past Childs at 9:27.
The Wolverines' tying score be-
fore McGill scored the winning
tally came one minute and two
seconds.later while McGill's Doug
McGregor was sitting out a two-
mninute tripping penalty.
Sophomore right wing Bob
White skated all the way from his
blue line to the visitors' blue line
where he got by the Redmen's
Don McDonald. From here he
flipped a pass to Switzer stand-
ing In front of'the net who flipped
the disc in to knot the score.

Lineup
NEBRASKA POS MICHIGAN
Don Smidt F Pete Tillotson
W. Fitzpatrick F M. C. Burton
Bob Mayo C Randy Tarrier
Lyle Nannen G George Lee
Gary Reimers G Jack Lewis
Broadcast
Tonight's hockey game be-
tween Michigan and McGill will
be broadcast by WCBN, the
Campus Broadcasting System,
starting at 8 p.m. There will be
no broadcast of tonight's bas-
ketball game with Nebraska.
WUOM has announced that
at present no broadcasts are
scheduled for any hockey or
basketball games either at home
or away.
COLLEGE SCORES
Michigan State 71, Detroit 59
Missouri 57, Marquette 56

SPORT SHORTS:
Cincinnati Trades Post
To Phillies for Haddix

-r

By The Associated Press

COLORADO SPRINGS, Cola. (')
-The Cincinnati Redlegs last
night traded outfielder Wally Post
to the Philadelphia Phillies for
lefthanded pitcher Harvey Haddix.
It marked the second trade in
two days for the Redlegs, who have
been talking swaps to all National
League clubs in an effort to
strengthen their pitching staff.
At separate meetings yesterday,
the American and National
leagues voted to scrap the bonus
rule and to establish a four-year
player draft.
The action ratified similar de-
cisions of the minor leagues
Thursday.
The American loop voted to
make the bonus rule retroactive.

This would free nine so-called.
bonus players in the junior circuit.
But the National League voted
to require the 12 bonus players in
that league to finish out their sta-
tus as bonus players.
-Walter O'Malley, faced with
mounting problems involving the
transfer of his Dodgers to Los
Angeles, said yesterday that it is
"possible but not probable" that
the team will return to Brooklyn
in 1959.
Was there a chance of the Dod-
gers returning to Brooklyn?
"No," O'Malley said. "There is
no chance of the Dodgers return-
ing to Brooklyn." Then he added
quickly: "Let me put it this way.
It is possible but not probable."

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merril P. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl, William
B. Hutchison, Eugene A. Ransom, ministers.
SUNDAY-
9:00 and 11:00 Dr. Abbey, "Conversation in
Eternity."
9:30-10:30 Discussion group on Christian Be-
liefs
5:30 Fellowship Supper
6:45 Worship and Program, Speaker, Rev.
Vaughn Whited of the Westside Metho-
dist Church. Topic: Do You- Know John
Wesley?"
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
L. C. Utley, Minister
SUNDAYS: 10:00, 11:00 A.M., 7:30 P.M.;
WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 P.M.
Television: Sundays 2:30 P.M., Channel 6,
Lansing.
Radio: Sundays 5:30 P.M. WXYZ 1270
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
PRESBYTERIAN STUDENT CENTER
at the FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432,Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Rev. William S. Baker, Campus Minister
Miss Patricia Pickett, Assistant
Sunday Morning Worship at 9:00, 10:30 and
12:00. Rev. Henry Kuizengo, Minister of the
Church.
Seminar, 10:30 A.M.
Open House in the Student Center, 11:30-12:00.
W.S.F. Supper, 5:45 P.M.
Worship and Discussion, 7:00 P.M. "Who Is
Christ?"
Mid-Week Worship, Wednesday at 5:15 P.M.
Coffee break at Pat Pickett's apartment (217 S.
Ob'servatory) from 9:30 to 11:00 P.M. on
on Tuesday. Drama group at 8:30 Thursday.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST ;
1,833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. Sunday Morning Service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday, Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading* room hours are: Mon-
day 11:00 A.M. to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday --Sat-
urday 11 :00 A.M. to 5 P.M. Sunday 2:30 to
4:30 P.M.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:00 A.M. Meeting for Worship.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
11 :30 A.M. Meeting for Worship
1 1:30 A.M. Adult Study Class.
THE THEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
IN ANN ARBOR
106 East Liberty, 2ND FLOOR
Public Discussion, Wednesday, 8:00 P.M.
Listen to Radio Theosophy, Sundays, 12:15 P.M.
WPAG (1050 kc).
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
10:45 A.M. Sernon, "The Tongues of God.,"
The CONGREGATIONAL and DISCIPLES
STUDENT GUILD
524 Thompson Street
J. Edgar Edwards, Director
Donna Hamilton, Associate
9:30 A.M. Bible Seminar for students, Section
1 at the Memorial Christian Church.
7:00 P.M. at The Congregational Church, Dr.
Preston Slosson will speak, topic, "As an Egg-
head.Looks at Religion."

MANY CHAMPIONS FEATURED:
Swim Gala To Be Held Today

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
8:45 and 11:00 Morning Worship Services. "The
Victory of Faith," Rev. William C. Bennett.
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
5:45 P.M. Student Guild.
7:00 P.M. Evening Services. "The Message of
Christmas Carols."
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M. Prayer Meeting.
WE WELCOME YOU!
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
and STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Ronald L. Johnstone, Vicar
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with Universal Bible Sunday sermon by the pas-
tor, "Rightly Handling the Word of Truth."
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:45: Bible Study Groups.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Fellowship Supper and Christmas Pro-
gram.
Wednesday at 7:30: Advent Vesper Service, Ser-
mon, "Experiencing His Advent into ur
Hearts." (Holy Communion will be celebrated)
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill at S. Forest
Henry 0. Yder, Pastor
Sunday-9:00 and 11:00 A.M. Worship Service
and Communion.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
6:00 P.M. Supper.
7:00 P.M. Play-"He That Should Come."
Friday-7:30 P.M. Graduate Group.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)n r
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-2665; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 Morning Service.
7:00 Evening Service.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Herbert R. Lowe, Student Assistant Pastor
Paul R. Eberts, Minister to Students
9:45 A.M. Student Guild andCoffee Hour.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service, Sermon topic, "The
Truth the Bible Tells," by Rev. Press.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild. Worship and Social
Night.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Rev. Leonard A. Parr, Minister
Church School and Nursery at 10:45 A.M.
Junior Church in Douglas Chapel, 10:45 and
11:15A.M.
At the public worship service Dr. Leonard Parr will
preach on the subject "Unexpected Finds."
Student Guild meets in Mayflower Room at 7:00
P.M. Speaker, Professor Preston Slosson. Sub-
ject, "As an Egghead Looks at Religion."
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A.M. and
12:00 noon.
Weekday Masses, 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:W
A.M. . :0 :0ad90
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes each evening in Christian Doctrine, Apolo-
getics, Church History, Scholastic Philosophy,
in the Father Richard Center.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M. Church School.
Adult Group: Three staff members tell of the
Church School program.
11:00 A.M. Servie of Worship. Sermon: "The
Rights of Children," by Edward H. Redman.
7:00 P.M. Unitarian Student Group Skating
Party at the Coliseum.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

~1

r

I

.$
,

I.

41>

By DICK MINTZ
The Michigan Gala will be held
today at 2:30 and 8 p.m. at the
Varsity Exhibition Pool.
To many fans the "Gala" title
suggests a swim carnival. It is true
that the program will feature com-
edy events and host many Olympic
and National champions but to the
freshmen of the NCAA champion
Michigan swim squad, the Michi-
gan Gala represents their first
"bluebook."
Since practice began in Septem-
ber, all their energies have been
devoted to this afternoon's events,
and the chance to show Coach
Gus Stager what they can do under
the pressure of top-flight compe-

tition. Up to this point swim men-
tor Stager has been very impressed
with their performance stating:
"We've never had so many good
swimmers going so fast so early in
the season.,,
Most of the freshmen are not
new to the competition they'll face
this afternoon. They include many
high school state champions and
All-American selections.
Frank Legacki, an All-American
selection from Pennsylvania, heads
the freshmen prospects in the 100
yd. freestyle event. All-American
Michigan high school champion
Dave Gillanders is the best in the
butterfly event. Mike Natelson,
who was runner-up to Gillanders

in the State meet, and Jack Pet-
tinger, the Illinois Catholic high
school champ, will make this the
most exciting event on the pro-
gram.
Highly Versatile
Harry Huffacett, another-Michi-
gan high school champion, epitom-
izes the versatility of the frephmen,
figuring to be a strong contender
in the individual medley.
Bill Brandell, whom Coach
Stager refers to as "the little boy
with lots of guts" is entered in the
gruelling 440.
He too is a state champion. Also
in this event is Tom Bucy, a trans-
fer student who is relatively un-
known in swimming circles. He is
highly rated by Coach Stager and
figures to play the role of dark
horse.
The diving duo of John Deining-
er and Tee Francis,'the respective

high school state champions from
Ohio and Michigan, will display
their talents on the three-meter
board.
The finals will be held at 8 p.m.
tonight. Tickets for this show are
60c for students and $1 for non-
students.
In-Suspend!
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (R) -
The Indiana University Faculty
Athletic Committee . uthorized
its representative, Professor
John Mee, yesterday to ask the
Big Ten to permit I.U. to lift
Football Coach Phil Dickens'
suspension.
Athletic Director Frank Allen
recommended the action in an
attempt to recover Dickens'
service before spring training.

.:s -.

(
N

Death Ends 26-Year Career
Of Indiana Swimming Coach

BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (P) -
Robert Royer, 55, head swimming
coach since 1931 and veteran of
Indiana University's coaching staff
died in his home yesterday,
He had been ill since an opera-
tion last spring.
Royer was chairman of the
swimming rules committee of the
NCAA and had two swimmers-
Bill Woolsey and Dick Tanabe-on
the 1956 U.S. Olympic team.
A native of Akron, Ind., Royer
was a swimming letterman at I.U.,
graduating in 1928. After teaching
in his hometown high school, he
returned to I.U. as swimming
coach in 1931 and served continu-
ously except for two seasons in
administrative work.
Royer will be succeeded by his
assistant, Dr. James Counsilman.

who recently came to I.U. from
New York State Teachers College.
Dr. Counsilman has been in
charge of the squad during Royer's
illness.
Royer's 1956 team tied for third
place in the Big Ten and his 1957
squad was fourth in the NCAA
championships.
When told of the news, Michigan
swimming Coach Gus Stager ob-
served:
"Bob Royer did a great deal
for swimming. All of us closely as-
sociated to the sport will miss him.
He built Indiana into a team that
was challenging Ohio State and
Michigan for Big Ten supremacy.
This year he had a great freshman
squad. He was just coming into his
own."

Make j
fFOLLETT'S
Your Christmas Shopping
Headquarters
for
GIFTS, CARDS, and WRAPPINGS
State Street at North U.
I MILK MAID DRIVE INN

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M. Holy Communion and sermon fol-
lowed by breakfast and discussion in Canter-
bury House.
11:00 A.M. Morning Prayer and Sermon.
4:00 P.M. Graduate Canterbury.
5:30 P.M. Buffet Supper.
6:30 P.M. The Rev. Carl Sayers of Allen Park,
Michigan will speak on "The Jewishness of
Christianity."
8:00 P.M. Evening Prayer.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH

_1;.
4

502 East Huron
Dr. Chester H. Loucks, Minister
Mrs. Beth Mahone, Assistant Student

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