100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 05, 1957 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


1
TiruRSDAY, DECEIMBER 5, 1957

TIRE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1957 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Cagers

Drop

o0ning

Tilt

to

BY JIM BAAD

Pittsburgh,
Hennon Tallies 26 Points;
Three 'M' Guards Foul Out

7262

I."-

An All-American-Finally
THIS WILL merely be a short observation on another year's selec-
tions of football All Americans. First of all, I'm extremely happy
to see Jim Pace get the honor he most thoroughly deserves. His
selection to the Associated Press All-American was a while in com-
ing (the AP is one of the last to come out) but it did come.
Throughout this past week I have been observing the various
other selections flowing in to the sports desk -- the United Press's,
the International News Service's, the Hearst, the Sporting News, the
American Football Coaches Association's, and even General Mills',
and the steady theme of All-American Walt Kowalczyk and not All-
American Jim Pace was beginning to sow seeds of doubt as to the
accuracy of the system..
A comparison of Pace's Big Ten statistics with Kowalczyk's alone
should be enough to discourage the 'voters' away from the latter and
towards the former. This is not to tear down Kowalczyk. He is an ex-
cellent back, but on paper Pace was better. In rushing, Pace was num-
ber one in the Conference with 584 yards gained in 100 attempts.
Kowalczyk was fifth with 400 yards on 64 carries. Kowalczyk's aver-
age was a bit better, 6.3-5.8, but Pace carried the ball 36 more times
and this greater number of risks tends to bring down a runner's
average.
Pace also led the Big Ten in scoring with 54 points. Kowalczyk
was third with 42. Pace's 584 yards were enough to rank him second
in total conference yardage even though he never completed a pass.
Kowalczyk was not among the leaders.
Add this to the statistics. Michigan State had one of the best
lines in the nation. Michigan's was small and at times not too effec-
tive. Kowalczyk was running behind State's line, Pace behind Michi-
gan's. Where Kowalczyk many times could find a nice hole to get
started. Pace had to forge his own hole.
Both men are obviously great backs, two of the best in the tough
Big Ten Conference. The point is, though the statistics were Pace's,
the All-American honors were regularly Kowalczyk's until the Asso-
ciated Press selections. Why?
Before the Season ...
LOOKING FOR an explanation one arrives at the pre-season build-
ups. These were the collective weights which must have swung the
balance of votes to the Spartan and not the Wolverine. Kowalczyk
was billed at the season's beginning as a potential All-American. The
stories proclaimed his poor junior season, laying it to an injury, and
all assured the public that the "Sprinting Blacksmith" was ready to
go-again. On the other hand there was very little about Pace. When
Michigan was mentioned (and it wasn't a whole lot last September)
Pace was considered a solid prospect, but not much about All-Ameri-
can status.
As it turned out both men had a great year. What followed?
Well, everyone knows.1 I've already said it. It's just a good ending
that the sportswriters of America, in their AP choice, overlooked
what was said before the season and concentrated on what hap-
pened during the ,season.

ONE ALONE-Halfback Jim Pace was Michigan's only contribution to the Associated Press 1957
All-America Team. No other Wolverine gridder was named by the AP on its three squads.
FORMER 'M' ICER RETURNS:

Special to The Daily
PITTSBURGH - Supposed
Michigan strong points became
weaknesses last night as Pitts-
burgh's basketball team parlayed
rebounding strength and a press
defense into a 72-62 victory over
the Wolverine cagers here in
Michigan's season opener last
night.
Michigan headed into the game
with a slight height advantage but
a quartet of Panthers dominated
both backboards. Pittsburgh's
half-court press stymied the visi-
tors' fast-break offense.
Also contributing to the Wol-
verine defeat was a weakness at
the foul line.
Although outscored by only one
field goal, Michigan was able to
convert only 18 of 28 free throws
while the Panthers were cashing
in on 26 of 36.
Panthers Take Early Lead
Pittsburgh seized an early 13-6
lead and, due to the rebounding
work of 6'3" Julius Pegues, 6'4"
Charley Hursh, 6'5" John Mills,
and 6'6" Dave Sawyer, plus the
marksmanship of 5'8" guard Don
Hennon, the host team stayed
ahead by six to nine points during
the first half. .
After a long goal by Michigan's
George Lee at the halftime buzzer
had reduced the Panthers' lead to
37-31, the visitors further whittled
the deficit to three points shortly
after the second half got under-
way.
But Pitt retaliated quickly to
again establish a nine-point lead,
which was not endangered during
the rest of the game.
Hopes of a Michigan rally late in
the game were squelched when
guard George Lee 'fouled out with
7:45 remaining in the game, with
two other Wolverine guards, Jack
Lewis and Billy Wright, following
Lee to the bench via the foul
route.
Poor Shooting Records
The visitors also suffered from
a lack of marksmanship from the
CAGE SCORES
Kentucky 61, Ohio State 54
Georgia 72, Clemson 60
Kansas 66, Canisius 46
Cornell 62, Buffalo 37
Dayton 62, Morris Harvey 43
Duquesne 72, Carnegie Tech 58
Rose Poly 54, Illinois College 34
Butler 90, Fort Knox, Ky. 64
St. Joseph's Indiana 58, Wabash 57
Loyola, Chicago 86, Omaha 46

field during the last half. After
compiling a respectable 43 per
cent shooting average in the first
half, Michigan fell off to 28 per
cent during the remainder of the
game. Pittsburgh maintained a
steady 36 per cent average from
the field.
Hennon, the short Panther
guard who connects on off-bal-
ance shots with either hand,
showed why he is being plugged
for All-American honors by net-
ting eight field goals and 10 of
11 free throws for a 26-point to-
tal, best of the night. Sawyer,
Pegues and Mills, besides excelling
on rebounding, supported Hennon
with 16, 12 and 10 points respec-
tively.
Wright topped Michigan with
six goals and five free tosses for
17 points. Lee and Pete Tillotson
finished with 13 apiece.
DISTINCTIVE
HAIRSTYLING!!
Try us for:
* WORKMANSHIP
0 SERVICE
011 BARBERS
R NO WAITING
The Daseola Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre

Pitt
MICHIGAN
Tillotson, F
Burton, F
Tarrier, C
Lewis, G
Lee, G
Miller, G
Wright, G
Kingsbury, G
Rogers, C
TOTALS
PITTSBURGH
Pegues, F
Mills, C
Hennon, G
Sawyer, F
Dorman, C
Shay, F
Hursh, G
Maloney, F
TOTALS
Michigan
Pittsburgh

NHL STANDINGS
W L T Pts.
Montreal 14 4 4 32
New York 12 10 4 28
Boston 10 11. 2 22
Toronto 8' 11 5 21
Chicago 8 12 4 20
Detroit 7 11 5 19
LAST NIGHT'S GAMES
Chicago 2, HEew York 0
Montreal 0, Toronto 0
He'll love his
Christmas
Tobacco Pouch
*
10109 Center
18 East Huron
312blocks from campus

Fit
G F PT
4 5-6 3 13
1 4-5 1 6
1, 2-2 1 4
3 0-5 5 6
6 1-4 5 13
1 1-1 3 3
6 5-5 5 17
0 0-0 0 0
0 0-0 0 0
22 18-2826 62
G F P T
4 4-5 5 12
3 4-1 5 10
8 10-11 2 26
5 6-6 2 16
0 0-0 1 0
1 0-4 2 2
2 2-3 5 6
0 0-0 0 0
23 26-36 22 72
31 31-62
37 35--72

By STEVE SALZMAN
Sometimes locker rooms are sad,t
and sometimes they are happy, but1
when they are empty, voices and
ghosts from the past seem to come
back to plague and bolster the
team.
Michigan's locker room is no
different. Like a spirit from the
past, Al Renfrew, a good natured,
cigar chewing idol returned this
season to become the new Wol-
verine hockey coach, who will
make his debut tomorrow.
Behind him are six years of
coaching experience, which bear
the fact that Renfrew is a masterI
of hockey fundamentals and tech-I
niques.
Played for Heyliger
To the Michigan hockey fan,
Renfrew is no stranger. He played
under Vic Heyliger, former coach
in the late 1940's. He was a mem-
ber of Michigan's first NCAA title

winner in 1948, and also a mem-
ber of one of the highest scoring
lines in Michigan history
Renfrew came to Michigan from
Toronto, Ont., Canada, where he
had established himself as an out-

building a team. After two years
in the second division of the West-
ern Intercollegiate Hockey League
his team finished fourth and then
moved into the runnerup spot in
the League.
The Huskies also finished as
runner-up to Michigan in the 1955
NCAA finals. In reward for his fine
season, he was asked to fill the
vacancy at North Dakota. At
Grand Forks last season he was
immensely popular and guided the
Sioux to a successful season with
a third place finish in the WIHL.
Now the goodlooking, cigar
chewing Renfrew, with his friendly
smile and warm handshake comes
to practice his magic at Michigan.
His attributes of being an ex-
cellent student and practioner are
surpassed only by his tremendous
teaching ability. As the Wolverines
opening game approaches against
McGill this weekend, one can see
that his natural talent as a play-
er, his knowledge of tactics and
his enthusiasm foreshadow a great
coaching career at Michigan.

SCRUBS HOLD BANQUET:
Redshirts Receive Pizza, Salutations

BOWLERS,
Let's Go Dowling .. .
OPEN BOWLING HOURS:
Weekdays. .. .11 A.M. to 6:30 P.M.
Saturday....I11 A.M. to 12 midnight
Sunday...... i P.M. to 12 midnight
"It's great for a Date"
20th CENTURY RECREATION
! Automatic Pinsetters " Air-conditioned . Free Instructions
214 West Huron, 1 Block West of Bus Station Phone NO 8-7470
Career For You With
Geophysical Service, Inc.
in Finding a World of Oil
PETROLEUM EXPLORATION
In U.S., Europe, Africa, South America
Asia and Australia
DECEMBER 5, 1957
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT,
347 West Engineering
or
GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT
2051 Natural Science
Graduates in
GEOLOGY PHYSICS
ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS

;

,4

(.

By BOB ROMANOFi
Michigan's Redshirts, also
known as scrubs, held their Third
Annual Football Bust last night
at a hall on South University,
The 15 players who showed up
feasted on pizza, and drinks, which
naturally were no stronger than
coke and milk.
The M. C. at the banquet was
White Sox
Complete
By The Associated Press
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.-
The Chicago White Sox pulled off
two big trades in less than 24
hours stealing the spotlight at the
annual Winter Baseball Meetings.
Tuesday night, the Chisox
swapped their top left - handedI
slugger Larry Doby and southpaw
hurler Jack Harshman to Balti-
more for pitcher Ray Moore, out-
fielder Tito Francona and utility
man Billy Goodman.
As soon as the dust had settled
Chicago's Chuck Comiskey turned
around and traded another slug-
ger, Minnie Minoso along with
utility infielder Fred Hatfieldto
Cleveland for pitcher Early Wynn
and outfielder-infielder Al Smith.

George Armelagos, a Redshirt
tackle last year.
Armelagos introduced end Fritz
Krueger who will be captain of
the scrubs next year. After Krue-
ger was introduced each player
then proceeded to introduce him-
self.
Pete Kinyon and Jim Orwig
handled the speaking chores.
Kinyon, former assistant line
coach, spoke on the importance
of Redshirts in college football.
Orwig, this year's captain of the
upper echelon of Wolverine foot-
ball, spoke on -football at Michi-
gan.
Naturally no sports' banquet
would be complete without the
awarding of trophies, so the Red-
shirts not wanting to have an in-
complete banquet followed suit.
Halfback Hugh Crossland was
voted the Most Valuable Player
and another halfback Jack Zach-
ery copped the Sportsmanship
trophy.
Ron Pulliam, Assistant Equip-
ment Manager, was awarded the
Willy Heston Award, which is
given to a non-player who has
given the most help to the Red-
shirts.
Knowing how important first
aid can be to a football team de-
siring to stay out of Health Serv-
ice, Ron Addison, Assistant Train-
er, received the Doc Coxen Award
for trainers.
The final award went to Don
Dufek who was voted Redshirt
Coach of the Year. His team had

a 3-0 record against the mean old
varsity.
One of his three victories was
in last year's final spring scrim-
mage which the varsity somehow
managed to win in five quarters
31-25. However, at the end of the
regulation four quarters the Red-
shirts were on the long end of a
25-12 score.

AL RENFREW
... returns to coach
standing high school player. Fol-
lowing his graduation from the
School of Education in 1949, he
spent the next two years in Ann
Arbor as a salesman for a local
concern.
Then the call from Michigan
Tech came, and Renfrew accepted
the position of coach in 1951, re-
maining there until the conclusion
of the 1955 season.
While coaching the Huskies,
Renfrew showed his talent for

Sport Shorts

11

1

Wolverine Gym Squad
To Host Prep Teams

Brown Retains Championship
CHICAGO UP) - Champion Joe'
Brown twice floored challenger
JoeyLopes with brutal right hand
shots to the jaw and retained his
lightweight championship, with a
technical knockout in 1:50 of the
eleventh round at Chicago Sta-
dium last night.
Brown started the successful
third defense of his title by drop-
ping Lopes for a four count in the
seventh round, also with a right.
wand shot to the jaw.
It was a close fight up to the
point of Brown's eleventh round
explosion.
Link Warmath to Arkansas
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - Reports
linking Minnesota's Murray War-

math with the Arkansas coaching
vacancy increased in tempo yes-
terday.
Word circulated that the drawl-
ing Tennessean was high ;on the
list of candidates to succeed Jack
Mitchell, who resigned last week
to take the head coaching job at
Kansas.
Warmath stood pat in his re-
fusal to comment.
Back to Brooklyn?
LOS ANGELES (IP)-- Petitions
for a'referendum on the real estate
deal between the Los Angeles
Dodgers and the city of Los
Angeles were officially approved
yesterday.
City Clerk Walter Peterson said
the necessary 51,767 valid signa-
tures were tallied with several
thousand still to be checked.

Although their schedule doesn't
officially open until January,
Coach-Newt Loken is doing a good
job of keeping Michigan's gym-
nasts busily at work.
Tomorrow the squad will hostE
an open house at Ann Arbor High
School. The Wolverine gym team'sf
task as hosts will be to offer ad-Z
vice to visiting high school gym-N
nasts as well as to exhibit the
form which has put Michigan upi
with the top squads in the coun-
try.
Two days later, on Saturday,'
the team will go to the "Windyt
City" to participate in the Mid-i
west Open which will be held atr
the University of Chicago.

Michigan's gym squad will enter
unattached as will most of the
Big Ten teams because each school
is only allowed to participate in
a certain number of meets.
This season won't be any easier
for the runner-ups in the Big Ten.
Michigan's biggest test will come
when it faces independent Penn
State the week before it engages
in the Conference Meet.
Loken said that he arranged
this meet with the NCAA Champs
at that time in order to bring his
team up to its best form before
its big meet which will probably
once again turn into a vicious
battle with Illinois for the title.

p

m P1M

N

Give him comfort
Evans
f HAND TURNED
See our complete line
of Evans Slipper/
styles for Christmas
today! Buy him ther
finest for Christmas.
00YEARS .

Might this story of,,
educational
huckstering
have happened fl
here?
wi
0 Written without gloves - and with a startlingly
intimate knowledge of faculty politics - THE
TARNISHED TOWER lays open the practice of edu-
cational huckstering and the men and women
who are out to sell Education (with a capital E)
as though it were a brand of cereal.
* This absorbing story flashes with anger. It will
make some people writhe, for it. touches on the
sorest points in American university life today,
Already the topic of hot discussion, THE TARN.
ISHED TOWER is one novel you can't afford to
miss. Don't wait to borrow it. Get your own copy
today.

m- mson"u.

I

0 D k

I

i

I

II

I

II 1 \

N 4 % 'l

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan