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November 22, 1957 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1957-11-22

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

;R SHORTAGE:
icator Predicts Lack
Scientists in Future.

ANSWERS QUESTIONS:.
Eldersveld Reviews Political Platform

'S

By The Associated Press
DET'ROIT -The U iited States
will produce only half the number
of scientists and engineers needed
in the next 40 years, a Columbia
University educator predicted yes-
terday.
Part of the reason, said'Charles
C. Cole, Jr., associate dean of the
undergraduate men's division of
Columbia University, is "almost
the disappearance of the com-
petent, well-trained, stimulating
high school science teacher."
$e called for an immediate
doubling of all teaching salaries to
avert a worsening in the shortage
of capable teachers.
Addresses Sessions
Addressing a session of the Edi-
son Foundation Institute. an or-
ganization devoted'to strengthen-
ing science education, Cole cited
decline in the number of college
graduates qualified to teach science
d, mathematics
He said that in 1955 there was
pnly one new chemistry teacher
for every 119 high schools and
one new physics teacher for every
259 schools.
Aside from money, Cole said a
reason for the shrinking numbr
of qualified science teachers is the
public image of the science teach-
erA the absent-minded professor,
an ineffectual, eccentric egghead
who must be teaching high school
chemistry because he can't find
another job."
Argue for Program
The arguments for a stronger
science education program go be-
'yond -the demands of the power
struggle between east and west, he
said.
l"Literacy today means knowing
how to read and write, and some
familiarization with the ways of
the molecule,,the meteorite, elec-
tromagnetism,'radiation," he said.
Another speaker atthe meeting,
Dr. Anne Roe of New York Univer-
sity, said a leaning toward a scien-
tific career is established in a child
before he starts to school.
Testing Won't Solve
Neither nationwide testing nor
stepped-up science and math
courses in high school will solve
the problem of the United States'
shortage of engineers and scien-
tisis, she said.
What is needed, said Dr. Roe, is
a change in the feeling of the "un-
sociablity of the scientist"
Homes that drill into a child a
rof. Hayes
W rites IBaook
On Securities
FA "book by Prof. ,Douglas A.
Eayes, of the School of Business
Admiinistration, "Appraisal and
Management' of Securities," has
beken recently published.
prof. Hayes designed the book
for use as a college text. Actual
crporations are used as examples
of hw individual stock issues may
b evaluated.
T hebook also includes a section
, te story of long-term invest-
amnt operations and the relation-
of various types of securities
to these operations.
Sports Car Clules
HolIds Gym khana
The Sports Car Club of Ann
Arbor will hold a Cymkhana at,
10 a.m. Sunday at Plymouth and
ord Roads, east of ther city.
Anyone with either a foreign car
or American sports car is invited
tod participate in the event. Each
entering driver, however, must
have a person to serve as naviga-
tor.

need for what she called "together-
ness" are less apt to produe a
scientist than a home that leaves
a child free to develop whatever
abilities he has, she said.
Blames Prejudice
Dr. Roe said prejudice against
minority groups cut out many stu-
dents who might develop into cap-
able scientists.
"Barriers to accomplishment by
members of racial minority groups
are cultural, not biological and our
security is the poorer for it" she
said.
Dr. Margaret Mead, associate
curator of ethnology, American
museum of natural history, New
York, said science too often is
taught as a dead subject.
'"We wreck our young children's
minds while they are little and
expect to turn them into scientists
in their teens," she said.
Economsts
Predict Fall
In USl. abor
Government economists predict-
ed yesterday that .nearly 4,000,000
Americans will be out of work by
the end of February.
Forecasters in the Labor De-
partment said one reason that un-
employment may 'jump well past
the present' figure of 250,000 is,
the waning of industrial expan
lion.
In a (move which indicated l-
bor's concern over the national
economy, George Mean, presi-
dent of the AFL-CIO, called on
President Dwight D. Eisenhower
to. take immediate steps to bolster
the nation's economy.
Families May Suffer
Meany' said, "Unless America
acts now. it means 'suffering for
workers' families and widespread
trouble for the entire economy"
Top organizers of the Teamsters
Union met in Seattle to "discuss
the unemployment s I t u a t ion
which is increasing all across the
country."
Dave Beck, outgoing Teamsters
Union president, said that yester-
day's meeting was one of a series
which he called because of the
country's economic "condition.
Calls Conferences
Beck said he felt it necessary
to call the conferences to "see if
there are anyrchanges we should
make in our organizing activities.
The National Association of
Manufacturers said it "is wrong
to suppose"; that government
spending is necessary to insure
full employment .
The Association told a Congres-
sional committee yesterday that
the nation's economy was hin-
dered somewhat by government
spending since "it is a withdrawal
of manpowey and other produc-
tive ,resources which might other-
wise be ued in expanding the
economy."
Predicts Unemployment
The Labor Department econo-
mists said that February usually
tops other months in unemploy-
ment because bad weather halts
much outdoor work and the
Christmas rush is over.
The economists also based their
prediction on the.fact that totals
of the unemployed did not drop
significantly in September and
October. Normally, unemployment
dips to its lowest levels in those
two months.

BY RALPH LANGER
"The platform . . . on which I:
was elected was carefully drawn
and its committments were not
accepted lightly," said Ain Arbor
Mayor Prof. Samuel J. Eldersveld,
of the political science department,.
while reviewing his tenure in office.
"Of course any past platform
has to be considered in the light
of passing events and new situa-
tions," he said. '"However, I am
impressed, now that I have had
some few months of experience in
serving as Mayor, with the rele-
vance and pertinence of that plat-
form. "We have implemented to a
considerable degree some of the
pledges we made. Action has gone
forward, satisfactorily in somer
cases, only slightly in others," he
continued.
Considered Important
The Human Relations Commis-
sion, activated by Eldersveld's ad-
ministration, is considered, by the
Mayor, to be one of the most im-
portant commission's in city gov-
ernment. "I consider its member-
ship top quality,' he said. "It has
cut its teeth on the Brantley case
and has begun a study of some of
the basic problems in housing and
e m p l o ym e n t discrimination. I
think all we have to do is give it
some time, along with continued
community support."
Mayor Eldersveld also believes
that the establishment and ap-
pointment of the Commission has
probably been one of the most sig-
nificant contributions of his ad-
ministration, thus far.
Norman Leads
Golden Jubilee
Prof. A. G. Norman, director of
the University Botanical Gardens;
is presiding at the golden jubilee
meeting of the American Society
of Agronomy in Atlanta, Georgia,
this week..
This organization is concerned
with field crop production and
soil management.
Secretary of Agriculture Ezra T.
Benson will be one of the speakers
to address the organization.
Martin Issued
AEC Permit
Prof. Joseph J. Martin of the
Department of Chemical and Met-
allurgical Engineering is the latest
University researcher to be issued
an Atomic Energy Commission
"access permit," the AEC an-
nounced recently.
More than six other University
scientists have already received
the permits which are issued to
keep scientists "abreast of. nuclear
technology," Joseph Keeley, Uni-
versity research security officer,
noted.

-Daly-Norman Jacobs
MAYOR ELDERSVELD
.. describes recent action
The Mayor has been working
with the Economic Development
Committee of the Chamber of
Commerce, in an effort to facili-
tate the establishment of certain
industries *in Ann Arbor. "This
would lighten the tax climate for
citizens he said The mayor said in
his pre-election platform that no
promises concerning the tax cli-
mate could be made at that time.
"I have discussed it at great
length with experts in the field
(of taxation) and as yet we have
found no immediate solution. I
hope that some of the spade work
now being done will show tangible
results later on," he said.,
The mayor stressed the desire-
ability of Ann Arbor citizens giving
more attention to municipal affairs
Notices
"Organization
(Use of this column for announce-
ments of meetings is available to of-
ficially recognized and registered stu-
dent organizations only.)
International Students Association,
Social, Nov. 22, 9-12:00 pm., Interna-
tional Center. Both members and non-
members may attend.
Arab Club, movies, Nov. 25, 8:00 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheater. The following
color films will be shown: "~This Is
Egypt," "Alexandria," "Lebanon, the
Dreamland". Admission free.
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
Nov. 22, 12:00 a.m., luncheon discussion:
"Faith Reaching for Reality," Nov. 22,
7:00, toy making project, Guild House.
* * *
Episcopal Student P o u n d a t l10 n,
luncheon at Canterbury House follow-
ing the 12,10 a.m. celebration of Holy
Communion at the church, 1v. 22.
Applications for "the Regional Inter-
national Student Relations Seminar,
Dec. 6- are available in the SOC area
df the Student Activities Bldg. Appli-
cations are due no later than 6:00,p.m.,
Nov. 25.
Senior Board, January Graduation
Announcement Orders taken, Nov. 22,
12:00-5:00 p.m., SAB.

than they do at present. "An un-
derstanding of and participation
in our city life by citizens is im-
portant," Mayor Eldersveld said.
Use Techniques
The Mayor stressed the desire-
which we have used to improve the
relationships between city govern-
ment- and the citizens," he con-
tinued. "Among these are: a week-
ly radio program every Tuesday,
an annual report, an open house:
and reception at City Hall, the
preparation of an informational
leaflet for those who attend Coun-
cil meetings, the development of a,
regular and formalized complaint
procedure for citizens with griev-
ances to get proper action and the
fact that the Mayor's office is open
to the public practically every
morning."
"In addition the Council has
held public hearings in order to
give the public a chance to express
its views," the Mayor said.
"Through these devices, we have
gradually been getting through to
Ann Arbor citizens better and in-
volving them in municipal affairs."
Propose Committee
A 100-man Citizens Committee
to study capital improvements was
proposed during the campaigning
last April. .This committee, which
was to serve in an advisory and
study capacity, has not material-
ized.
Mayor Eldersveld said that he
would appoint such a group when
"the time is ripe." Council recently
considered the development of a
Capital Improvements program,
but has tentatively decided to de-
lay it," he continued. "At that dis-
cussion I stated that when we
were ready to go ahead with such
a program, I wanted a Citizens
Committee appointed.
"The Chamber of Commerce has
established an Economic Develop-
ment Committee. When the urban
renewal program goes forward, I
am going to appoint a Citizens
Committee to work on this pro-
gram, including people from the
urban renewal area and the con-
munity as a whole," he explained.
When asked about his political
future Mayor Eldersveld said that
he hadn't been able, as vet, to
think carefully about any future
plans.

PICK:
'U Cellist
Dies at 73
The world renowned cellist, Prof.
Hanns Pick, who taught at the
University from 1927 until his re-
tirement in May, 1953, died Nov.
9 at 73 years old.
After arriving in. Ann Arbor
Prof. Pick served as an instructor
in the literary college and the
music school. When the music
school became a part of the Uni-
versity in 1929, he was made a
full professor .and taught cello un-
til his retirement.
Before teaching at the Univer-
sity, Prof. Pick was first cellist
of the Philadelphia Orchestra from
1925 to 1927. Prior to that he had
been associated with many of the
outstanding orchestras in Europe
and had toured that continent as
a soloist, appearing in nearly all
of the great European music cen-
ters.
From 1914, until he came to this
country in 1924, he served as direc-
tor of music at the St. Gall School
in his native Switzerland.
Professor Pick returned to
Switzerland after his retirement
and spent two years there before
moving to LaJolla, Calif., where he
resided until his recent death.
co m~oPicks Baldwin'
As Secretary
The Great Lakes Fishery Com-
mission has appointed Norman S.
Baldwin, formerly of the Ontario
Department of Lands and Forests,
as its first permanent executive
secretary.
Baldwin replaces acting secre-
tary James W. Moffett, of the
United States Fish and Wildlife
office, in Ann Arbor. Headquar-
ters for the Internationally oper-
ated commission will be at the
University building on N. Univer-
sity Ave.
The commission-began opera-
tion in August, 1956, with the pur-
pose of ridding the Great Lakes
of the parasitic sea lamprey.
:al

Prof. Wilbur J. Cohen of the
School of Social Work yesterday
predicted a Congressional battle
over possible cuts in social welfare
appropriations.
Cohen spoke at a general ses-
sion of the 43rd annual Michigan
Welfare Conference in Grand
Rapids. He is a former director
of research and statistics for the
Social Security Administration.
There are indications that cuts
have already been proposed in
federal aid for public health and
public assistance, he said, as well
as the outright elimination of the
federal government's school lunch,
vocational education' and water
pollution programs.
He said the proposals are prob-
ably caused by pressure for a bal-
anced budget and the additional
money needed for the United

Cohen Predicts St

Over Social Welfare Ft

States missile program s
advent of Sputnik.
"There will undoubt
much controversy over ti
posals,".Cohen said. "I th
necessary for those who 1
the importance of thes
programs to organize the
for a real fight."
Cohen himself will
changes in the social secv
when he appears before t
Congressional Economic
tee in Washington Tuesd
Two of the most neces
provements, Cohen said,
raising of benefits by i
the level of contributions
increasing of the maxim,
able wage base for social
from the current $4,200 t
mum of $6,600.

I I 'it I -

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DEDICATED. TO
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sponsored by
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Nov. 22, 1957 7:30 P.MV
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